#1
What defines this? Just playing classical music? Or is applying classical music to a modern, rock/metal context? In terms of chords and scales?

If that is the case, what would you need to know? chord formation, modal theory, chordal theory, CAGED system, etc...?
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#2
I'd define it as playing classical music with metal arrangements and sounds.
#3
I define it as using Harmonic minor scales, and diminished scales, as well as fast passages.
Usually they contain arpeggios as well and some sweeping. Thats what i think of, check out yngwie malmsteen or youtube neoclassical.
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#4
neoclassical is simply classical music played with more modern instruments, dosent have to be metal or really fast guitars...

but they are by far the best kind
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#5
Neoclassical is an age of music like romance and baroque. All classic music from 1900 to this day is neoclassical music.
#6
Quote by Punkismygod
Neoclassical is an age of music like romance and baroque. All classic music from 1900 to this day is neoclassical music.


This is the technically correct answer. Although in my opinion, 1950 to now should have a different name. Possibly something like "post classical".

Technically, Stravinsky, Holst, Bernstein, and other huge composers of the 20th century are put into the same genre as Malmsteen and whatnot, which is not even close.
Last edited by coffeeguy9 at Jan 3, 2009,
#7
Classically inspired metal.

Not actually neo-classical, as Paganini, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and Chopin (romantic, not classical composers) had more of an influence than real classical music (like Mozart). I'd guess it was the virtuosic solos that guys like Yngwie liked, as in, classically based wankery.

Scales? Same scales as classical music, major/minor scales
Modal theory? No. Romatic music seldom used modes. Although guys like Bartok and Stavinsky experimented with modes.
If I knew what the CAGED system was, I might comment on it.

If you really wanted to write neoclassical metal, all you have to do is steal bits from virtuosic romantic songs and play it over a metal powerchord thing.

You could write your own, but that would involve alot of theory and counterpoint and knowing the classical methods of "melody writing."

Neoclassical is an age of music like romance and baroque. All classic music from 1900 to this day is neoclassical music.
That's not really what T/S was asking for. T/S is looking into guys like Yngwie and Becker and Blackmore, not guys like Stavinsky and Bartok.
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[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
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        L.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Jan 3, 2009,
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Classically inspired metal.

Not actually neo-classical, as Paganini, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and Chopin (romantic, not classical composers) had more of an influence than real classical music (like Mozart). I'd guess it was the virtuosic solos that guys like Yngwie liked, as in, classically based wankery.

Scales? Same scales as classical music, major/minor scales
Modal theory? No. Romatic music seldom used modes. Although guys like Bartok and Stavinsky experimented with modes.
If I knew what the CAGED system was, I might comment on it.

If you really wanted to write neoclassical metal, all you have to do is steal bits from virtuosic romantic songs and play it over a metal powerchord thing.

You could write your own, but that would involve alot of theory and counterpoint and knowing the classical methods of "melody writing."

That's not really what T/S was asking for. T/S is looking into guys like Yngwie and Becker and Blackmore, not guys like Stavinsky and Bartok.


thanks for that. thank you to coffeeguy9 and punkismygod. Well I know lots of theory and a bit of the CAGED system. So I guess the next step is to listen to virtuosic music of the romantic era ?(damn I should have payed more attention in Music Discovery Class) Then go on to incorporate things I hear into my own writing?
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#9
CAGED is the order in which arpeggio shapes appear on the neck if you start on C.

Not actually neo-classical, as Paganini, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and Chopin (romantic, not classical composers) had more of an influence than real classical music (like Mozart). I'd guess it was the virtuosic solos that guys like Yngwie liked, as in, classically based wankery.

You could pretend* to be clever and label Malmsteen Late (after) Romantic then I guess.

*I.e you'd still be wrong, but slightly closer to being correct.
Call me Batman.
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
Classically inspired metal.

Not actually neo-classical, as Paganini, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and Chopin (romantic, not classical composers) had more of an influence than real classical music (like Mozart). I'd guess it was the virtuosic solos that guys like Yngwie liked, as in, classically based wankery.

Scales? Same scales as classical music, major/minor scales
Modal theory? No. Romatic music seldom used modes. Although guys like Bartok and Stavinsky experimented with modes.
If I knew what the CAGED system was, I might comment on it.

If you really wanted to write neoclassical metal, all you have to do is steal bits from virtuosic romantic songs and play it over a metal powerchord thing.

You could write your own, but that would involve alot of theory and counterpoint and knowing the classical methods of "melody writing."
That's not really what T/S was asking for. T/S is looking into guys like Yngwie and Becker and Blackmore, not guys like Stavinsky and Bartok.



I have to slighty disagree

To be a semantic bitch right now.

Yngwie Malmsteen made Neo-Classical-Metal, not purely neo-classical music. You could call it wank, but that's totally subjective.

You can say that in the romantic era, every classical trained music student could write a composition in the style of those composers, and they wouldn't see it as "genius".

What if you just like metal that uses those intervallic sounds (harmonic minor). That's just a matter of taste. That's saying that metal artist should stick purely to minor and pentatonic or else it's "classical" wank is a bit to far fetched

I get a feeling that this is more based on HOW people interprete the music as opposed to just listening to the music.

STill you made a good post

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 3, 2009,
#11
When the guitarist is fat and arrogant
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Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#13
Neoclassical is an age of music like romance and baroque. All classic music from 1900 to this day is neoclassical music.


This is the technically correct answer. Although in my opinion, 1950 to now should have a different name. Possibly something like "post classical".

Technically, Stravinsky, Holst, Bernstein, and other huge composers of the 20th century are put into the same genre as Malmsteen and whatnot, which is not even close.


Aie yie yie! This is wrong.

Music from the 1900 to 2000 is simply called 20th century.

Romantic, baroque, and classical music all are names which describe a time in which there was still a common practice amongst composers. That is why they are called 'common practice periods. Duh.

The 20th century saw the advent of the phonograph along with other technological advances (and general globalization) which destroyed everything the human race had come to know about the progression of music. The idea of a 'common practice' become absurd and so we use many different names, or genres, to describe the music of current times.

There is neoclassical (stravinsky, poulenc, etc.) atonal or dodecaphonic (schoenberg, webern, berg, messian etc.) minimalist (Phillip Glass) impressionist (debussy, ravel) post-romantic (scriabin, rachmaninoff, feinberg) and the just play bizzare stuff, like John Cage and Ligeti which is usually just called 'experimental'. Anyways, that's just the tip of the iceberg as far as modern concert music goes.

But to answer TS's question, when speaking in respects to musicians like yngwie malmesteen, neoclassical in that sense is mostly just doodling in harmonic minor and is characterized by a predominantly baroque influence.

EDIT --> As far as things to learn, if you can get someone to teach you 4 part choral writing, and basic counterpoint (which you really needn't know, but is useful) you'll be more or less set.
Last edited by Erc at Jan 4, 2009,