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#1
i dunno where to put this so i thought the pit is fine. Mods can move it if they want.

But basically i managed to get a copy of Perfect Pitch Ear Training, Relative Pitch Ear Training and Brent Manning's Singing Success. and so far Perfect Pitch seems like a bunch of bull**** and its some guy just talking. does anyone have any experience with any of these recorded lessons? are they any good, did they help you? any tips on how to use these audio lessons more effectively?
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#2
well usually if you dont have such a negative attitude towards it then you might get more out of it.
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#3
You can learn perfect pitch? I was under the impression that it was more a natural thing.
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#5
^ I was waiting for how long it would take someone to post that.
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#6
Quote by Arrived+Dparted
You can learn perfect pitch? I was under the impression that it was more a natural thing.

It's supposed to be. People who have it are born with it.

But if you've ever read Guitar World magazine, tehre's always a two-page ad near the end for a bunch of CD's that will supposedly teach you hear perfect pitch. I've always wondered if they work.

And thank you to ZeGuitarist for posting FuckFace.
#7
Quote by Ed Hunter
^ I was waiting for how long it would take someone to post that.


It's still the Pit
#8
well according to this audio lesson that i downloaded off torents, you can. but he seems to be just hinting on how to get it and most of the stuff the guy says is repeating stuff he said on the previous CD. anyone have expereince with this ear training program got any advice? should i keep doing it or am i wasting my time
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
Fender FM 212
Boss ME-50
#9
ahhh good ol' F*ck Face.
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#11
i should have known in the pit i wouldn't get a serious answer, maybe i'll post it somewhere else later.
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#12
Quote by Wiland
i should have known in the pit i wouldn't get a serious answer, maybe i'll post it somewhere else later.



you got a serious answer.


"
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well according to this audio lesson that i downloaded off torents, you can. but he seems to be just hinting on how to get it and most of the stuff the guy says is repeating stuff he said on the previous CD. anyone have expereince with this ear training program got any advice? should i keep doing it or am i wasting my time"
#13
I have perfect pitch and I've had it since I can remember (3 year old telling my mum she's singing a song in the wrong key as the original recording, but in 3-year-old terms)
It's not something that can be learned. You have to be born with it.
Relative pitch, on the other hand, can be learned, so keep working at that one.


EDIT: And could someone post the picture of F*ckface with the caption that's something like "My name is ****face I have PERFECT PITCH lol" or something?
Last edited by =w=eeze at Jan 3, 2009,
#14
^ Actually it's not really known if it can be learned or not.
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#15
^Oh I was told by a couple of my music teachers over the years that it can't be learned. I guess it's possible but I can't fathom how it would be done
#17
Quote by sashki
It's supposed to be. People who have it are born with it.



no they aren't, it's actually acquired/developed in early childhood, whether or not you can develop it past age 7 or 8 is debatable.

Quote by boreamor
Is relative pitch when you can tell if the pitch if off or not, but can't tell the note?


relative pitch means that you can pick out the interval between two or more notes.
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#18
Quote by boreamor
Is relative pitch when you can tell if the pitch if off or not, but can't tell the note?

I think it's part of it. Relative pitch is actually the ability to tell what a note is if you hear a root note to compare it to. (Don't quote me on it, my definition might be slightly off)
Last edited by =w=eeze at Jan 3, 2009,
#19
Quote by =w=eeze
^Oh I was told by a couple of my music teachers over the years that it can't be learned. I guess it's possible but I can't fathom how it would be done


A few years back the view of whether it could be learned or not was rather... negative. Now it's just unclear, it would take some advanced teaching I suppose and perhaps a disposition to the conscious cogntive learning of perfect ptich.
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#20
Quote by Kensai
A few years back the view of whether it could be learned or not was rather... negative. Now it's just unclear, it would take some advanced teaching I suppose and perhaps a disposition to the conscious cogntive learning of perfect ptich.

That actually makes sense. Out of curiosity kensai, do you have perfect pitch?
#21
Quote by =w=eeze
That actually makes sense. Out of curiosity kensai, do you have perfect pitch?


Sadly no =/

I can hear if the pitch is off or if a guitar is out of tune, but that's about it.
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#22
isn't perfect pitch actually not desirable amongst musicians? I think it would be really interesting to have, but would probably prefer really strong relative pitch.


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#23
Perfect Pitch can be developed at a later age. At least to some extent.
#24
Quote by MTVget0FFtheAIR
isn't perfect pitch actually not desirable amongst musicians? I think it would be really interesting to have, but would probably prefer really strong relative pitch.



I agree. I have kinda weak relative pitch. That's it. Workign on maing it better.
#25
I was using the David Burge Perfect Pitch course for a while. It is a lot of work, so i eventually just gave up

It was working while i kept up with the excersizes though.

About learning perfect pitch, you cant really learn full perfect pitch per se, but stuff like the David Burge courses teaches you a form of it and its pretty damn close. Of course, you probobly arent going to be able to tell what pitch your lawn mower is, but you can do it with regular notes in a musical context.
#26
Quote by MTVget0FFtheAIR
isn't perfect pitch actually not desirable amongst musicians? I think it would be really interesting to have, but would probably prefer really strong relative pitch.

I think my perfect pitch sometimes borders on OCD. Like I hear a car horn honk and I think unconsciously "well that one honks Ab with an overtone of B" or I hear my phone vibrating in my jeans and think "Oh now it's vibrating at a C#"
So yea, sometimes it can be annoying.
Also, when someone's playing a guitar (this happens in the worship band in my church all the time, one of the reasons i choose not to be in it) when some douche's B string is slightly sharp and no one seems to notice except for me! It's almost painful to listen to.

EDIT: ^^^ My lawn mower is Bb
Last edited by =w=eeze at Jan 3, 2009,
#27
just to make it clear, perfect pitch is the ability to identify and name a note or chord without hearing any other sound to compare it to.
So if you wake up in the morning and you just want to sing a B for example, you can do it, because you know it sounds and can sing it.
although, it has one or two "disadvantages" like some anoying when hearing something out of tune, it's a very good skill for musicians. just see the list of people who are supposed to have it.

Jimmi Hendrix, supposedly had an untuned guitar, no music knowledge. he just goes to a shop, gets a tuned guitar, plays all the strings one by one, once, goes back home and tunes his guitar..

Beethoven, composes an entire complex song after being completely def..

so, perfect pitch enables you to
name any note heard without any reference tone
sing any note asked without reference tone
being able to write music mentaly
playing by hear after just listening to something once..
and it goes on

I don't have perfect pitch, just learned about the whole thing yesterday.
It's almost proved that it's possible to have it and to make children learn it from a young age. as for older people learning it, seems like it's not been proved if its possible or not.
I'll take David Bruges course and test it in myself, since his course seems to be the best one out there. if possible Relative pitch and perfect pitch should both be learned
#28
I've heard plenty of debate on if you can learn it or not.
I don't have it.

There's one guy in my theory class who memorized what a C sounds like so when he hears a note he can compare it to a C and tell what it is.
#29
i wonder if any progress could be made by simply listening to a note over and over throughout the day. Just take any note, say an A note, and grind it into your memory while trying to guess it before each listening session. It'd be much simpler to focus on only one note, and see if it's learnable.
#30
I'm lucky enough to have it. I hardly ever use tabs anymore, unless I need to learn some insanely fast shred part of a song. (Usually I can figure out the scale, but if it's DT or something, tabs are needed for the really fast parts.)
#32
I can figure out notes in my head by playing a scale in my mind :p

It helps, but it is occasionally inaccurate and I can only really get A,B,C,D,E,F, and G, no flats or sharps.

I have what you call "almost-perfect pitch"
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#33
Quote by Glen'sHeroicAct
i wonder if any progress could be made by simply listening to a note over and over throughout the day. Just take any note, say an A note, and grind it into your memory while trying to guess it before each listening session. It'd be much simpler to focus on only one note, and see if it's learnable.


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#34
After playing for a few years I have learned to recognize pitches but I do it relatively; if I hear something I don't just say "that's a D", I have to compare it to a pitch in my head and then figure it out.
#35
I read in "Singing For Dummies" that Perfect Pitch can't be learned but relative pitch can be. It's supposed to be the ability to have somewhat of an idea of what certain tones sound like and being able to figure out notes using intervals relative to the root as someone else mentioned.

I remember taking singing lessons for a while and my teacher tried having me memorize what all the intervals sounded like. She gave me examples and then I tested myself on guitar. I would hit the open string then put a finger on a fret without looking and hit that note and try to guess the interval. It actually worked as I kept at and I do think that at least being skilled at intervals is extremely valuable.

I bought the Brett Manning singing success thing. It's overpriced, but it's easy to use and actually is effective. Plus it comes with a money back guarantee, I think.
#36
I'm so unbelievably glad I don't have perfect pitch. Relative pitch is so much more useful in every possible respect, and I think having perfect pitch would just end up annoying the **** out of me when ever anything wasn't tuned to 440 or in the right key.
#37
Well i know that you can get perfect pitch (although i think if its not natural its called something else) but i dont know any software that can teach you. You could play each note for like 10 minutes every day or something else to try to memorize them on your own. That should work.
#38
I think the concept of perfect pitch is bull****. I can tell you what a note is or sing any note out of thin air, which is what perfect pitch supposedly is, but my actual sense of pitch isn't perfect. Like, when I sing or tune the guitar, I'm usually off by a bit.
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#39
I don't have perfect pitch and my relative pitch is awful as well. I was messing around with an online program which would play two notes and you try to guess the intervals between them. I pretty much consistently only guess the correct interval 35 percent of the time
#40
I hate these ads in my magazines so much. They take up 2 pages. And yeah, I knew it was utter bull**** without even trying it.

Don't be fooled by all these pitch siding programs or tools. Just practice, practice, practice, and it'll come to you. You don't need stuff like this.
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