#1
Hey fellow UG'ers!

A quick question, how does one get Oli Herbert's left hand technique as in Chiron's solo? On the video it looks like his left hand's fingers never go more than 1cm from his fretboard... Is this just a video trick or does he really play like this?

In short, what do I have to do to let my fingers on my left hand stay close to the fretboard?

P.S: I think everyone knows, but Oli Herbert plays for All That Remains.
YouTube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCkG0jUxdYg

Thanx in advance
Quote by Aguamento

I'm glad he handled it calmly. Joe Satriani should realize that with only 7 notes in the world, some songs are going to sound similar.


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#2
thats just his style.. lots of guitar players do that to help themselves play fast. but obviously its not needed since we have guitar players like paul gilbert. i cant do it, my pinky HAS to fly off the fret board by 2 inches.

what you can do? well, you can try to not let your fingers leave the fret board...
Last edited by cloud041089 at Jan 3, 2009,
#3
it is such a nice technique tho. makes me sad that i cant keep my fingers that low. but then again you dont wanna try to hard and screw up your own style in the process.
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#4
So it isn't really a MUST for playing fast? Cool...
Quote by Aguamento

I'm glad he handled it calmly. Joe Satriani should realize that with only 7 notes in the world, some songs are going to sound similar.


My Gear


Yamaha G-225
Ibanez RG7321
Santa-fe 5 String
Ahead 7A Drumsticks
#5
Quote by CrAzE124
So it isn't really a MUST for playing fast? Cool...

nope.... except for maybe della vega, since he played flight of the bumble bee at 320 bpm to get his name in the record books. otherwise no... lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MvQb85bNF4
Last edited by cloud041089 at Jan 3, 2009,
#6
Quote by CrAzE124
So it isn't really a MUST for playing fast? Cool...

It isn't a must, but it definitely helps keeping your fingers close to the fretboard to execute precise fretting.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#7
It's definately important. Part of playing efficiently is making sure that you aren't wasting motion. As far as the "MUST" aspect, I don't believe it's necessary to play quite as close to the fretboard as Della Vega (you can barely see his fingers move), but you do need to play fairly close. Part of it depends on what the next note is. For example, if you where playing a lick that alternated between the index and the pinky with nothing in between - then you've got to keep that pinky in the ready position (i.e. close to the fretboard). But if you were playing something that went pinky-ring-index and ended there it's less of a big deal if the pinky comes up a bit.

Best way to get it is to focus more on playing relaxed. You can't force that one, it will develop over time from playing relaxed and in control.
#8
I'm trying to learn to play like that.

Ascend a 4nps scale VERY slowly, however make sure that you keep each finger close to the fretboard. Your pinky might have difficulty performing said action, so pay careful attention to that.
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#9
Quote by CrAzE124


In short, what do I have to do to let my fingers on my left hand stay close to the fretboard?


Learn to control your fingers.

Believe it or not, playing that way is completely natural, easy and effortless. That's
because the time was spent discovering what natural, easy and effortless actually IS.
#10
Take a look in the sticky, and the "finger independance" and "correct practice" vids on my youtube account.

And if you want to play really fast, yes, it's a must to work on economy of motion.