#1
Ok, so I'm an intermediate (?) bassist, currently in a band. The band is new and thus pretty small-time, but we're looking to go places (aren't we all?). Anyway, my current 'rig', if you will, is just an Ibanez EDB 400 and a 180-watt Behringer amp. This equipment suits me just fine right now, but I feel as though I might need more equipment if I'm going to be gigging seriously or possibly touring in the next year, neither of which I've ever done in the past.

So here's where you guys come in: my sources of income are very limited and whatever gear I intend to pick up in the near future will have to be saved-up for. In my position, what would you save up for first and foremost, and why? Right now my inclination is toward some sort of multi-effects pedal, to allow more freedom with tone and variety of sound.

The other area that I need advice in is somewhat unrelated, but; lately when composing basslines, I feel as though I'm using the same patterns and fills over and over (fifths and octaves mostly). They work at times but ultimately I feel uncreative and unoriginal using them. I'm looking for a way to expand my repertoire, something to take my playing and originality to the next level. I've got some knowledge of scales and such, but studying those only seems to make my style more formulaic. So basically... any ideas here are appreciated.

And sorry if i rambled
#2
Quote by bassbones


The other area that I need advice in is somewhat unrelated, but; lately when composing basslines, I feel as though I'm using the same patterns and fills over and over (fifths and octaves mostly). They work at times but ultimately I feel uncreative and unoriginal using them. I'm looking for a way to expand my repertoire, something to take my playing and originality to the next level. I've got some knowledge of scales and such, but studying those only seems to make my style more formulaic. So basically... any ideas here are appreciated.

Learn theory/ more theory
I find that I get the same thing as you sometimes. try learning some new songs, or just practice scales instead for a while
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Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
#3
learn your theory and listen to lots of different basslines in songs closely.

also swap out that behringer amp as they have some quality control issues that are gonna suck big time when you get gigging. you should concentrate on that first and foremost
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Gear:
Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass
Fender V Jazz
Ashdown MAG 410
EH Bass Big MUff
MXR Bass Octave Deluxe
Digitech Synth Wah
#5
The groove is what counts especially off the drummer, if the drummer can't cut it and make you feel comfortable it's a long and tiring road.
I ever we're trying out drummers the final say as the Bassist is always mine.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#6
Quote by Tatersalad1080
learn your theory and listen to lots of different basslines in songs closely.

also swap out that behringer amp as they have some quality control issues that are gonna suck big time when you get gigging. you should concentrate on that first and foremost

this.

that bass deserves a quality amp.

and the major and minor scales alone will boost your playing's versatility.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#7
Don't waste your money on multi-fx pedals. Go straight for dedicated pedals.
#8
there's probably a thread for it, but what amp would be good to upgrade to? when i did my initial research, the behringer seemed to be by far the most bang for my buck, but tbh my priority then was wattage/$, since i had heard that nothing under 100W would be audible in moderately sized gigs.
also to be honest, it will be a good while before I actually can buy anything. that is unless i get a much better job or my band proves wildly successful . it is something that i want to begin thinking about, and you guys are probably right about the amp.

as far as theory goes, i do know the major and minor scales, in general. i know that major is WWHWWWH and minor is WHWWWHW. what i do most often is play around in a minor pentatonic scale based on the chord being played, but there's a certain 'understanding' of it that i believe i lack to make best use of this though.

grooving off of the drummer is a concept that i've only really recently considered. i feel like i've always just done it naturally, but things like playing on a snare beat to emphasize it are new to me. i was always used to playing off of the guitar, both melodically and rhythmically. so now i can never tell if i'm playing to the guitar or to the drums. furthermore i feel as though a great bassist can break from the guitar melodically or even the drums rhythmically and still keep everything together.

jesus, this post ends here, but good stuff so far guys, thanks. keep it coming
#9
New amp first and foremost. I waited five years to get any effects because I knew that they would make my playing suffer or I'd become distracted. Learn theory and play with your drummer alone often. He is your best friend in the band.
DB Player
#10
^I've played with effects a while, and will say this- if you do choose to get them, play clean a lot. if you start every piece with clean, then add in effects to make the bass fit the song fit a certain way (like overdrive to carry a heavy distortion in a heavy song) or to fill in a spot that needs something cool (like wah to add to a rather meh fill)

learn to jam with more than one drummer, I have played with drummers of almost every style and it is truly satisfying to be able to tell a drummer to play when he himself doesn't know how to sound a certain way.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#11
Quote by bassbones
as far as theory goes, i do know the major and minor scales, in general. i know that major is WWHWWWH and minor is WHWWWHW. what i do most often is play around in a minor pentatonic scale based on the chord being played, but there's a certain 'understanding' of it that i believe i lack to make best use of this though.


If you do start to study theory seriously you'll have to get away from the WH business when refering to degrees of the scale; you'll be taught T,T,St,T,T,T,St.

I was taught conventional theory which is what you will have to learn if you want to enter the wider world of music, Brass, Reed, Percussion and Keyboards will not understand/accept WH/Tab terminology.

Tabulature is only good for learning a piece of music that you are already familiar with; you cannot play a piece of music written in tabulature form and understand how the composer meant it to be played whereas music written in the conventional form is meant to be played As Written which is a very different thing.

Whilst not wanting to appear to be knocking Tabulature it is at best a limited form of theory and only useful to those who only intend to take their learning/studying so far.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn