#1
I have a history project where I have to research (among other things), music from 66-69.

I've got quite a lot of info already, but a few questions:
1. What sort of pop and country bands were there, because I have to be fair and include all genres :P. But if they weren't that popular, I really don't need to include them.
2. What sort of guitars and amplifiers were typically used, and effects?
3. What genres were dying out by then, and what (such as metal) were just being born.

I have ideas for these, but I'd like extra tidbits !
#2
firstly, lucky you
1. Obviously the Beatles were still high in pop circles in Britain and in America The Doors were ruling the airwaves. As for country i do not know. Although the Beatles broke up in '69, pop music did not die.
2. Clapton started to pioneer the gibson/marshall set-up and the use of the fender strat was becoming popular. The guitar had recently overtaken the vocalist in rock music as the drawcard of the band. This was glorified by clapton, hendrix and page and so on. Effects, the wah wah became pretty mainstream in this time and hendrix and beck pioneered just about every effects pedal out there.
3. Led Zeppelin were beginning heavy metal and soon Black Sabbath would release an album. So yes, metal was just beginning. As for dying genres, blues was starting to die. In the seventies Clapton was the only one who kept it alive. Also rockabilly music was dead by 1966, but no genres really died. It was the end of the major British invasion of music in America in the 1960's.

Theres a few more points you could research in depth and produce a quality essay.
If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all
#3
1. It's hard to say because I didn't live in that time, but The Beatles, Stones, Byrds, Monkees, etc. along with all the blues based hard rock really was pop at the time. As for country, Johnny Cash released Live at Folsom Prison which made him popular again and Merle Haggard was pretty big, but I can't really say much else. You should also talk about some jazz, even though it wasn't mainstream at the time, there was a lot of change and innovation going on in jazz during the 50's and 60's. Just talk about John Coltrane's work with atonal music (although don't play a sample) and Miles Davis' second quintet and his transition into fusion and you should be fine.

2. baylewis's post about covers it

3. Metal was born obviously. The Byrds' album Sweetheart of The Rodeo as well as Gram Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers signaled the birth of country rock (which flourished in the 70's) and paved the way for the alt-country movement (which started in the late 80's and still flourishes today. The roots of punk were being sewn with the release of debuts by The MC5 and The Stooges, as well as The Who. James Brown was a major figure in the birth of funk music, which happened around this time. King Crimson's debut helped to create prog rock, which had it's commercial peak in the 70's. Emergency by Tony Williams and In A Silent Way by Miles Davis both helped in the birth of jazz fusion. There were a lot of genres that were born in this period.
#4
3. The rise and fall of psychedelia? I mean, it survived a bit until 1970-71, but after that, it kind of stayed hidden for a while. or at least, not to the extent that it was at during 1966-69
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#5
I believe Vox amps were probably still the most popular at that point, though by the late 60s, Marshall came more into the picture.

Effects-wise... we're just talking fuzz, reverb, and a few people were using delays like the Echoplex, Binson Echorec, etc.. It was more common to see some slapback delay added in the studio. As has been said, wah was pretty standard.
Hey, I'm Mike.
#6
That was the time I started going to London's Marquee Club.
'66 was still dominated by the regular pop bands - Beatles, Stones, etc., but Cream started about then and alongside Hendrix and Pink Floyd spearheaded the changes that were happening right through to the seventies. In live venues the bands played heavier each year with so many great bands emerging. Like Yes to name just one. Bands who could really play the music instead of lip-synching for TV. Underneath the rock emergence, a great English Blues scene developed with people like John Mayall, Ten Years After and the first lineup of Jethro Tull. The other genre that emerged at the end of the sixties was folk-rock with Fairpoer Convention followed by Steeleye Span at the forefront.
I will take issue with the poster who accused Beck of using every effect going. Wrong my friend. He was famous for only using an Arbiter treble boost. I did see him live with his own band in '68 or '69 and he certainly only used that with an AC30 on stage in a fairly small club.
Tape-based delays (echo boxes) were common, the WEM being the most popular, producing amazing pre-Hawkwind feedback, but I saw a few Arbiter disk ones around in the shops. The Cry-Baby was the pedal to have but fuzz could be anything. Maybe the Fuzz Face was favourite.
Then Woodstock happened and lots of different things followed.
Fav. guitars were still Gibsons. Mainly LP and SG with a few semis too. Strats were gaining in popularity and Status Quo broke the mould by using Teles. The Marshall stack was standard gear with one or two 50w heads. No-one much liked the 100w heads at that time.
#7
Quote by Lurcher

I will take issue with the poster who accused Beck of using every effect going. Wrong my friend. He was famous for only using an Arbiter treble boost. I did see him live with his own band in '68 or '69 and he certainly only used that with an AC30 on stage in a fairly small club.


How could he use the arbiter treble boost and get a sound like the ending of 'He's Always There' on the Roger the Engineer ALbum by the Yardbirds?
If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all
#8
Thanks a lot guys! This is very helpful, and I can't wait for the presentation. :P I'm undecided as to what clip to show. I'm thinking of showing the Killing Floor (Jimi Hendrix, at Monterey).