Page 1 of 2
#1
What can I do? I mean I really doubt guys like Steve Vai and Richie Kotzen just magically picked up the guitar one day and played emotionally. They had to of done something to build up to that point. So what can I do to make my playing more meaningful and emotional?
#5
Quote by RUIN717
minor scales are sad


this
Quote by Guns N' r0ses
lets say your on your own computer at home and your 18 and ur looking at porn, if ur parents catch you, legally you're allowed to look at it right so you can't get in trouble?
#7
Quote by Endless_Pain
What can I do? I mean I really doubt guys like Steve Vai and Richie Kotzen just magically picked up the guitar one day and played emotionally. They had to of done something to build up to that point. So what can I do to make my playing more meaningful and emotional?


Write using minor chords to solo over. To make the guitar sound more vocal and personal use slides, bends, vibrato, accent the minor sounding notes.

Fool around and figure what works best.
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#8
Quote by Iriathz
Correct scales.
Correct vibrato.


What exactly do you mean by correct?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#9
Quote by The_Sophist
What exactly do you mean by correct?

Suitable.

Are you going to play a sequence of happy notes in a sad song? Preferably not.
My Last.fm
USA Fender Stratocaster | Roland Cube 60 | VOX ToneLab LE
#11
Quote by RUIN717
minor scales are sad



Harmonic minor sounds epic to me and not sad.

/point

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#12
Quote by Pageles
try crying while playing

+1
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.

#13
Playing emotionally is all about phrasing. I like to compare how I phrase a solo to a human conversation; lots of short notes bring about feelings of urgency and intensity while long and slow notes bring a sense of emotion and feeling to the piece, but these are obviously not always the case.
#14
wtf is "playing emotionally"

thats a term i never really liked, how is one piece of music more emotional than another?
#15
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
wtf is "playing emotionally"

thats a term i never really liked, how is one piece of music more emotional than another?

Well, Death Cab's I will follow you into the dark (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=WzlZKCRMnI0) is clearly more emotional than this (self-proclaimed) mindless shredding (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=rNClC0ou3-E)
#16
well thats hardly a good example, the death cab video is a song.. the other one is just some dude wanking. The second video was clearly ****

I understand what people mean when they use the term, i jut don't like it.
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Jan 4, 2009,
#17
What's goin on UNDER the solo adds a lot to the emotion, the instrumentation, chord progression etc. There's a lot of factors.

But generally yeah use the minor scales and practise phrasing.

And Check out some of J Mascis's solo's or John Frusciante. The masters of emotional soloing despite what some people may think of them (Frusciante in Particular)
#18
I've said this before and I'll say it again: You're best off looking and analysing the songs that you think sound very nice and emotional and want to sound like yourself; see what the composers of those songs have done, and try to emulate it in your own playing.
#19
Quote by ImaHighwayChile
What's goin on UNDER the solo adds a lot to the emotion, the instrumentation, chord progression etc. There's a lot of factors.

But generally yeah use the minor scales and practise phrasing.

And Check out some of J Mascis's solo's or John Frusciante. The masters of emotional soloing despite what some people may think of them (Frusciante in Particular)


Definitely. +1 for that. I'll link to a very good video, on his soloing philosophy and such. It's a little less than halfway in the video, around 3:15. (Damn, I've linked to this video in every thread I've posted, it's a really great video ) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqgXSmmzFCU&
Hello there.



I lurk a lot.



It's what I do best.
Last edited by AwesomenessFTW at Jan 4, 2009,
#20
Quote by AwesomenessFTW
Definitely. +1 for that. I'll link to a very good video, on his soloing philosophy and such. It's a little less than halfway in the video, around 3:15. (Damn, I've linked to this video in every thread I've posted, it's a really great video ) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqgXSmmzFCU&


Thanks for that, good video.
#21
Quote by ImaHighwayChile
What's goin on UNDER the solo adds a lot to the emotion, the instrumentation, chord progression etc. There's a lot of factors.


This man is right. I've been playing guitar and composing pieces for over three years now. There is this one solo, which is, I believe, one of the very few solos I've written in the major scale, yet it is the saddest one of all. Why? Chord progression, the entire buildup and tension etc etc.
Quote by Xplozive
You sir are a dick!
Quote by Toppscore
And then again, Wildthang, "You're probably NOT one of them clean Socialists, either"

Wat.
#22
Quote by Iriathz
Suitable.

Are you going to play a sequence of happy notes in a sad song? Preferably not.




If you see note like this, stop playing immediately! It will ruin you emotional playing!

/offtopic

TS, do you admire any musicians in particular for playing emotionally? Different people find different music emotional. Can you describe style you are striving for?
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#23
Play in D Minor; when people hear it, they instantly begin weeping.
#24
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
well thats hardly a good example, the death cab video is a song.. the other one is just some dude wanking. The second video was clearly ****

I understand what people mean when they use the term, i jut don't like it.

Quote by Peaceful Rocker
wtf is "playing emotionally"

thats a term i never really liked, how is one piece of music more emotional than another?

Both of them were pieces of music (improvising is music) and one was clearly more emotional than than the other.

It was a bit of an extreme example but compare the latest girls aloud song to that Death Cab one and you can see that the Death Cab one is more emotional.
#25
Write in Dminor for 'tis the saddest of all keys. Check out 'Lick My Love Pump' for proof of this.

But seriously, go slow, really think about what notes you are playing, where you're gonna go next andhow you're gonna get there. Employ the use of vibrato, verying from heavy to subtle. Use large bends, like the firstbend in the second solo of Comfortably Numb. To me, that sounds really emotional that bend. Use sustain to your advantage, keep a note going for as long as possible. Reverb is also a good effect to employ lightly. Play more cleanly, with a touch of delay. Use a wah to add subtle effect to what you're playing.

Perhaps even think about sad times when you're playing. If you feel sad, you're gonna play sad, right?
#26
Quote by Endless_Pain
What can I do? I mean I really doubt guys like Steve Vai and Richie Kotzen just magically picked up the guitar one day and played emotionally. They had to of done something to build up to that point. So what can I do to make my playing more meaningful and emotional?


Don't try to force something like that.
Get inspired by music, play music, enjoy playing music. Let yourself play what feels natural to you. Emotion isn't something you practice, it's something you feel or not. Just play, and don't worry about it.
shred is gaudy music
#27
Quote by GuitarMunky
Don't try to force something like that.
Get inspired by music, play music, enjoy playing music. Let yourself play what feels natural to you. Emotion isn't something you practice, it's something you feel or not. Just play, and don't worry about it.


Exactly.

Everyone plays with equal emotions.


Steve Vai just learned/played in a way HOW to transcribe it in a wider accepted "universal" train of thought or emotional piece or musical idea.

Popular doesn't equal more emotion.

Popular equals unleashing emotion in more people.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#28
Quote by WildthingJR
This man is right. I've been playing guitar and composing pieces for over three years now. There is this one solo, which is, I believe, one of the very few solos I've written in the major scale, yet it is the saddest one of all. Why? Chord progression, the entire buildup and tension etc etc.

Ever heards of modes? You might think you were playing major, but I'm pretty convinced that you were playing in a minor mode if it sounded sad.

Furthermore, yes what's going on under you is important. There are more ways of playing emotial, your best bet would be to have a good look at songs you think are emotial/good and looking what they did. Look at the scales they use what notes they use over which chords, which notes are important and give it feeling and which notes are just to pass.
Experiment.
Guitasr:
Cort KX-Custom
ESP LTD M-200FM
Amp:
Engl Powerball
Misc:
Focusrite Scarlet 2i4
#29
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Exactly.

Everyone plays with equal emotions.


Steve Vai just learned/played in a way HOW to transcribe it in a wider accepted "universal" train of thought or emotional piece or musical idea.

Popular doesn't equal more emotion.

Popular equals unleashing emotion in more people.

well, I'm not sure if everyone plays with equal emotions. I definitely feel that some people connect more emotionally with the music than others.

My main point is simply not to force playing with emotions, but to let it happen naturally. if you're really enjoying playing music on your guitar, chances are you are playing "emotionally". it's not something you have to try to do, it's something you just do ( or not in some cases).

the only way I can think of to "practice" playing with emotion, is to work on songs that evoke emotions in you. By physically playing those songs on guitar you can learn what it feels like to express those feelings. That may open some doors in regards to connecting emotionally with your own music, and help to develop your own style. Like I said before though if you are playing music that inspires you and are enjoying it, you're pretty much doing that anyway..... naturally.


on a side note:

I have to say that I don't get much out of Steve Vai's music on an emotional level, though I do have great respect for his talents. I hear a lot of his music as being contrived on an emotional level.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 4, 2009,
#30
Quote by darthbuttchin
Write in Dminor for 'tis the saddest of all keys.


Its only "saddest" because the voicing of the open shape of the tonic chord puts the minor third in the tonic, which is the note which makes it sound sad.

Try playing Em and add the g on the third fret of the high e, and it should sound equally sad to Dm.
#31
Quote by isaac_bandits
Its only "saddest" because the voicing of the open shape of the tonic chord puts the minor third in the tonic, which is the note which makes it sound sad.

Try playing Em and add the g on the third fret of the high e, and it should sound equally sad to Dm.


he was being sarcastic..... "D minor is the saddest of all keys", is a quote from the movie spinal tap, and is meant to be a joke. just like. " but my amp goes to 11"
If you haven't seen spinal tap, you should check it out, it's pretty damn hilarious.
shred is gaudy music
#32
Quote by GuitarMunky
well, I'm not sure if everyone plays with equal emotions. I definitely feel that some people connect more emotionally with the music than others.

My main point is simply not to force playing with emotions, but to let it happen naturally. if you're really enjoying playing music on your guitar, chances are you are playing "emotionally". it's not something you have to try to do, it's something you just do ( or not in some cases).

the only way I can think of to "practice" playing with emotion, is to work on songs that evoke emotions in you. By physically playing those songs on guitar you can learn what it feels like to express those feelings. That may open some doors in regards to connecting emotionally with your own music, and help to develop your own style. Like I said before though if you are playing music that inspires you and are enjoying it, you're pretty much doing that anyway..... naturally.


on a side note:

I have to say that I don't get much out of Steve Vai's music on an emotional level, though I do have great respect for his talents. I hear a lot of his music as being contrived on an emotional level.



But that's really an argument of 1's emotions are more emotion then someone else's emotion.

If 1 feel's happy listening to Vai and not listening to slash, and someone else has the opposite, then who feels "More emotion".

How do you base that 1 connects with music more? If his technique is better? better vibrato? better note choice?

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#33
Quote by xxdarrenxx
But that's really an argument of 1's emotions are more emotion then someone else's emotion.

If 1 feel's happy listening to Vai and not listening to slash, and someone else has the opposite, then who feels "More emotion".

How do you base that 1 connects with music more? If his technique is better? better vibrato? better note choice?


^ It's not an argument just my point of view.

One can only judge based on their own perceptions. Thats why I didn't say that "Steve Vai doesn't play with emotions". I said that I hear (perceive) much of his music as being contrived emotionally.


That being said, I think it's fair to say that one person could connect more emotionally with their music than another. We are not all equal in every aspect of our being. Some people do have abilities that others do not.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 4, 2009,
#34
Quote by isaac_bandits
Its only "saddest" because the voicing of the open shape of the tonic chord puts the minor third in the tonic, which is the note which makes it sound sad.

Try playing Em and add the g on the third fret of the high e, and it should sound equally sad to Dm.


Like GuitarMunky said, i was quoting Spinal Tap. I'm aware that other Keys can sound pretty damn sad and whatnot.

I highly suggest you check out Spinal Tap. If you've ever been in a band, big or small, you'll definitely be able to relate to the issues within it. If not, heck its pretty ****ing funny so yeah, watch it.
#35
^ " I met her on Monday, it was my lucky bun day.... you know what I mean...."


hehe
shred is gaudy music
#36
''It's beautiful it really is. What's it called?''
''Lick My Love Pump''

that bit cracks me up every time.
#37
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ It's not an argument

One can only judge based on their own perceptions. Thats why I didn't say that "Steve Vai doesn't play with emotions".

That being said, I think it's fair to say that one person could connect more emotionally with their music than another. We are not all equal in every aspect of our being. Some people do have abilities that others do not.


True, but what I mean was this doesn't mean you play "Emotional" guitar.

IT can very well be u are emotional connected to music, but you can't translate that into playing.

Very easy example is this.

r favourite guitar player picks up a sax and he plays total ****. If you didn't hear his l guitar playing, you would probably see him as 1 of the ****tiest sax players ever or who has no emotions, whilst if he plays guitar he suddenly is "connected".

You can't judge someone's connection with music based on how they play, or you say that everyone who can't play an instrument can never connect deep to music.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 4, 2009,
#38
Quote by xxdarrenxx
True, but what I mean was this doesn't mean you play "Emotional" guitar.

IT can very well be u are emotional connected to music, but you can't translate that into playing.

Very easy example is this.

r favourite guitar player picks up a sax and he plays total ****. If you didn't hear his l guitar playing, you would probably see him as 1 of the ****tiest sax players ever or who has no emotions, whilst if he plays guitar he suddenly is "connected".

You can't judge someone's connection with music based on how they play, or you say that everyone who can't play an instrument can never connect deep to music.



Like I said, it wasn't an argument, and I'm not going to argue. I have my perception on this subject based on years of playing and listening to music, and .... living. You're not going to change it. I respect your point of view though.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 4, 2009,
#39
Quote by GuitarMunky
Like I said, it wasn't an argument, and I'm not going to argue. I have my perception on this subject based on years of playing and listening to music, and .... living. You're not going to change it. I respect your point of view though.


True, but I'm connected to music so deeply that I treat it like my girlfriend, which is the reason why I Always get defensive in MT and ****, yet I'm no god guitarplayer.

Although I try to be more objective lately.

Still I don't think ability = emotion.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#40
Quote by xxdarrenxx


Still I don't think ability = emotion.


I agree. I've seen examples of people play lightening fast, technical solo runs, filled to the brim with sweeps, tapping, pinch harmonics and the like. I listen to it and then think 'But B.B King is so much better''. With his few notes, he can convey exactly how he's feeling. Lightening fast runs just say to me that the player is brimming with teenage anxety and hormones and doesn't know how to release them.
Page 1 of 2