#1
I have the following chords in a progression: F - G - C/Cadd9 - D

What other chords can I use and what is the key of this?
#2
if u make the D a Dminor i would place it under C major,
What u can do for future reference is take each chord and gather the notes writing them down

In this case what u have is a C major scale with an added F# outside note
#3
Thanks man. I know a little about theory but I picked up the guitar to compose, not to make covers. I'm learning but when I come up with something I find nice in any way I have to ask around in order to try and complete it. I actualy never completed a song in my life but I try a lot and I know I'll get it.

Could you, or someone, tell me what other chords can I use? That's the most important part as of now since knowing the key will only help me when trying to write a solo with my current musical knowledge...
#4
if u going to use the key of C, then it would be C - D - E - F - G - A - B

1. Have u learnt about intervals yet, so then u can determine whether its major/minor et

but basically in the major form it goes I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viio

I = major
II = minor
o = DIminished

hope this helps a bit more let me no if u need more
#5
Well that's what I'm learning atm so could you please explain the major/minor/diminished thing? I dind't quite get that from eithr you or my teacher...:P
#6
if you're in C major (which looks likely) you could go through the scale of C major and see what chords would fit. In this case:

C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - possibly Bsus4

If you plan to use G major then you could use

C - D - Em - G - Am - Bm

If you're using Cadd9 good chords to use with this are Dsus2 which is xx0230, Dsus4 which is xx0233 and G/F# which is 220033.

Hope this helps.
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#7
I had already figured out the Dsus2 and Dsus4, I used them a lot as variations of D for texture. That is of some help indeed so thank you. The thing is I'm still missing some fundations to fully understand what you said. I only have an idea of it...
#8
im afraid i cant help u more at the moment with the interval assistance, but it would be very wise to focus some time on it, im just about to do that now to get a wider understanding lol sorry mate
#9
Quote by paquiquinho
I have the following chords in a progression: F - G - C/Cadd9 - D

What other chords can I use and what is the key of this?


This starts off in the key of C Major, but the D chord is a modulation to G Major. You can use any chords in the keys of G Major and C Major, but be careful not to mix them up too much. I suggest you choose one or the other and consider the F# over the D an accidental.
#10
I totally missed what you said there. About modulating and the accidental. Things I have eard about, but have no knowledge in...
#11
Modulating is when you move from one key to another. This is most commonly done using a so called "Pivot chord". This chord is a chord that is present in both keys. For example in your progression there, the F, G and C are both present in C Major. The G, C and D are both present in G Major. What you've done, is used G and C as pivot chords to move smoothly from one key to another.

If you're unsure as of yet what chords you should and shouldn't use (as, for example, an F following the D won't sound too good), I suggest you consider the F# an accidental. Accidentals are notes that aren't in the key, but are used briefly because they sound good at that moment. So you use the note as an accidental, and then continue writing in the key. You could simply consider the F# in D Major an accidental and continue writing only in C Major. Or, you could, if you feel confident enough, accept that you've modulated into G Major and continue writing in G Major. That's your choice though.