#1
Every great band has thieir special way of making music that will make you recognise it whenever you ear it. The Ramones would play barre chords, down strums only, mostly on a i-iv-v progression.

What I was wondering is what is the "secret" behind Pink Floyd or Nirvana sound.

I know they have nothing to do with each other but they, along with The Ramones, are my main musical influences so I would like to know their technics so I could try to use them in my own way in my writting...

If anyone can help me with this I would apreciate it...
#3
nirvana--> powerchords, with massive distortion and chorus in every song
wouldn't know about pink floyd though...
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#4
David Gilmour has a really specific sound; for example, he likes to incorporate a lot of 1.5 step and 2 step bends into his solos, and likes to use a lot of double stops. A lot of the chords in Pink Floyd songs are played using an almost funky rhythm (e.g. another brick in the wall).

Kurt Cobain has a very specific tone to his guitar, and likes to add the chorus effect as well. You will also find that Nirvana songs are very simple, based on one or two riffs. Cobain's solos often replicate the vocal melody.
#5
Of course! There is a secret behind every band! If you play powerchords with massive distortion you will sound like Nirvana (no other bands do that!), and automatically get famous. And about Pink Floyd:

First you must create band centered around LSD-fueled songwriter! When he goes completely crazy, bring one excellent guitarist to replace him. Bassist and that new guitarist must take that crazy songwriter's place. Then experiment for couple of albums. Go and film yourself playing in the arena. Then make ''Dark Side Of The Moon''!

I guess you can continue now...

/rant

Michal is giving you good advice. But if you know that Gilmour loves to use bends and double stops - you will not be any closer to his style.

Try learning Pink Floyd and Nirvana songs and analyzing them.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
Last edited by DarTHie at Jan 4, 2009,
#6
Quote by michal23
David Gilmour has a really specific sound; for example, he likes to incorporate a lot of 1.5 step and 2 step bends into his solos, and likes to use a lot of double stops. A lot of the chords in Pink Floyd songs are played using an almost funky rhythm (e.g. another brick in the wall).

Kurt Cobain has a very specific tone to his guitar, and likes to add the chorus effect as well. You will also find that Nirvana songs are very simple, based on one or two riffs. Cobain's solos often replicate the vocal melody.


As for Nirvana, that is what I already know. What I'm looking to fiht.nd out is what kind of keys and how they combine the chords and that kind of stuff that I'm not even explaining right.

As for Pink Floyd, you got me started there. I had noticed the 1.5/2 step bend in solos like another brick in the wall or shine on you crazy diamond. The rhythms are a mix of that funky you were talking about with a mellower, more work with the keybords and the solos rhythm imo. Still I'm looking to know the same as I want for nirvana. Scales, types of chords, etc...
#7
Quote by paquiquinho
As for Nirvana, that is what I already know. What I'm looking to fiht.nd out is what kind of keys and how they combine the chords and that kind of stuff that I'm not even explaining right.

As for Pink Floyd, you got me started there. I had noticed the 1.5/2 step bend in solos like another brick in the wall or shine on you crazy diamond. The rhythms are a mix of that funky you were talking about with a mellower, more work with the keybords and the solos rhythm imo. Still I'm looking to know the same as I want for nirvana. Scales, types of chords, etc...


Scales and keys aren't that important to getting a band's sound, it's more about instrumentation, structure, rhythm, phrasing etc.

Nirvana hardly stick to any single key, I doubt Kurt Cobain knew what a scale was.
Pink Floyd tend to use basic minor and major keys, with the odd complex chord thrown in. They often modulate (e.g. "Mother" is in G major and C major) throughout songs as well.
#8
Scales and keys aren't that important to getting a band's sound, it's more about instrumentation, structure, rhythm, phrasing etc.

Nirvana hardly stick to any single key, I doubt Kurt Cobain knew what a scale was.
Pink Floyd tend to use basic minor and major keys, with the odd complex chord thrown in. They often modulate (e.g. "Mother" is in G major and C major) throughout songs as well.[/QUOTE

I see what you're saying. I'm new at composing so I'm just trying to understand what the bands I listen to do as a starting point, then going from there to find my own sound.

Even though I already knew that for Nirvana, I just can't get anything close to that. Man I know Cobain was a freakin' genious, but still...

Pink Floyd is probably more of a dream than an actual possibility atm for my band but we are looking in every way possible to creat something we enjoy. The couple of songs we have written as a band sound generic pop-punk and we don't like that. So we're looking in the likes of such bands who had the kind of sound that we want to get in our own way.

Do you have any knowledge in drums or/and bass as to give me some advice in those areas to?
#9
Nirvana's sound is based heavily on Dynamics. Quiet verse's, loud chorus's type thing. Although he created the image of a musical 'retard' in a way, ill bet he did have some knowledge of scales and the like. Most of the solo's follow the vocal melody however, so when writing Nirvana style songs, it is imperitive that you have a strong vocal melody.

As for Floyd, well that's slightly more difficult, being that they have a larger back catalogue and span many different styles.
Initially, it was song's with a pop sensibility, although signifcantly odd enough to create a feeling if musical superiority. Basically, i think Syd played what he felt sounded good and the allowed someone else (to my knowledge Rick Wright) to work out what it meant in musical/theory terms.
As for later Era floyd, it seems very much that they jammed around progressions and riffs that one or other of them had invented until they found something that worked. Again, dynamics comes into play. Floyd are more about 'the bigger picture' or how the music can be displayed to the audience. They weren't really a '4 guys on stage, play songs, leave' band. They were more a theatrical band in a way. They liked to put on a show. I think the basis of their sound came from Rick Wright, with his knowledge of theory etc, but that wasn't what Floyd were about. They created images in front of your eyes, but simultaneously in your head. It's difficult to source exaclty how to write like Floyd i suppose, as they were so one of a kind really.
#10
Yeah darthbuttchin I think you're totally right abou Floyd but as I sayd in a post above, we just want to sound not-generic, and that's what floyd did. I prefer the Gilmour era personally though...
#11
Quote by paquiquinho

Do you have any knowledge in drums or/and bass as to give me some advice in those areas to?


Well, the bass in Pink Floyd is usually quite complex, with a nice rhythm and plays more than just the root note of the current chord. There are also often bass riffs (e.g. "Money") and bass solos "e.g. "Hey You" intro), so the bass is quite complex.

Nirvana's bass just plays simple root notes.

Drum-wise, I don't know much about Nirvana 'cause I don't really like them all that much so don't really listen enough to know. Pink Floyd's drumming is often relatively simple, but changes a lot throughout the song (e.g. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond"). That song is also a great example for changing time signatures, which Pink Floyd like to do. They use a lot of 6/8 (e.g. "In the Flesh?" and "The Thin Ice") and experiment with some other as well (e.g. "Money" which is in 7/4).
#12
Quote by paquiquinho


Pink Floyd is probably more of a dream than an actual possibility atm for my band but we are looking in every way possible to creat something we enjoy. The couple of songs we have written as a band sound generic pop-punk and we don't like that. So we're looking in the likes of such bands who had the kind of sound that we want to get in our own way.

Do you have any knowledge in drums or/and bass as to give me some advice in those areas to?


Take the basis of these Pop Punk songs and play around with them. Add effects, dynamics etc. Build around it to make it more interesting. Have a play around with different musical ideas until you find something you like. No one can tell you HOW to play a song, but we can try to give you an idea of how to improve a song.

Drums and Bass. Well, they are really down to the respective musicians. As guitarists, we all seem to be big on the idea that Bass is easy, but having seen some damn good bassists, i realise i haven't got a clue about forming complex bass lines. As for drums, simple 4/4 rock is as big as i go. I can't help you much here im afraid.

Whilst i remember, don't be afraid to try different musical things. Today i heard a Sum 41 song that featured Kerry King. I was like 'what?' then realised, tht's awesome, they're steping out of what would be expected of them.

just my 0.02, hope it helped, db
#13
Quote by paquiquinho


I see what you're saying. I'm new at composing so I'm just trying to understand what the bands I listen to do as a starting point, then going from there to find my own sound.

Even though I already knew that for Nirvana, I just can't get anything close to that. Man I know Cobain was a freakin' genious, but still...

Pink Floyd is probably more of a dream than an actual possibility atm for my band but we are looking in every way possible to creat something we enjoy. The couple of songs we have written as a band sound generic pop-punk and we don't like that. So we're looking in the likes of such bands who had the kind of sound that we want to get in our own way.

Do you have any knowledge in drums or/and bass as to give me some advice in those areas to?


You know, michal gives you great advice. But it will not help you. Pink Floyd spanned through four decades. They changed their style.

Try listening to ''Astronomy Domine'', ''Echoes'', ''Sheep'', ''Atom Heart Mother'' and ''Time''.
Do you see a change in their style?

My best advice is to try to listen extensively to both bands and learn your favorite Floyd and Nirvana songs. Try cover some Floyd and Nirvana with your band.


You say that you already knew that for Nirvana, but you can't get it to sound like Nirvana. There's your evidence.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
Last edited by DarTHie at Jan 4, 2009,
#14
Quote by DarTHie
You know, michal gives you great advice. But it will not help you. Pink Floyd spanned through four decades. They changed their style.

Try listening to ''Astronomy Domine'', ''Echoes'', ''Sheep'', ''Atom Heart Mother'' and ''Time''.
Do you see a change in their style?

My best advice is to try to listen extensively to both bands and learn your favorite Floyd and Nirvana songs. Try cover some Floyd and Nirvana with your band.


You say that you already knew that for Nirvana, but you can't get it to sound like Nirvana. There's your evidence.



+1

What you really want to be doing is learning some theory, and then composing some songs that you like and sound good to you. Oh, and learning theory is important - it will allow you to use very interesting chords and concepts to give a very unique sound, as opposed to straight "C - Am - F - G" progressions in every song.
#15
I met many people who thought that covering songs is wasting time. Why cover songs when you can write songs?

But it will make your band sound tighter, more rehearsed. It will learn you many things about songwriting. It will learn every member of your band something about their instruments.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#16
Learning their approaches to composing are more important than learning the nuances of their technique or lack thereof.

Nirvana liked heavy Black Sabbath style riffing with really catchy vocal melodies. Also really utilized mood, dynamics, noise, and punk attitude. Try playing a rugged, arena ready rock riff and mumbling a lovely tune over it. But when you get to the chorus, switch gears and do it louder, softer, slower, or faster.

Pink Floyd (looking at dark side of the moon) were all about atmosphere, mood, and creating a trippy experience via music. Try going a little too crazy with effects boxes until you find something you fancy.
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