#1
mods i dont know if this is in the right section of the forums so please feel free to move it if need be.

this year for my honors chemistry class i have to participate in my schools science fair. generally i hate science fairs but this year i decided i'd actually try. firstly i would like to say that i want my project to be based on something that has to do with electric guitar. so some things i thought about are different questions that my project could be about. so here they are ( please answer them if you can and if you have a relevent question that could add to my topic please tell post it. )

1. how are the vibrations in guitar strings converted to sound coming out of the amp

2. does electricity flow through the pickups ( i have passive pickups )

3. can i measure the output coming from the guitar without it being plugged into the amp ( or before that output reaches the amp ), and without taking out my pickups.

4. what do i use to measure this, and what unit will it be in? ( watts, amperes, hertz, etc...)

5. how do different componants of the guitar affect the electrical output of the guitar ( things like: tension of strings, and _____________________________ please add to this list if you can. )

im not new to guitar but i dont understand the electrical aspects of guitar. i know how to play, but i don't know how the pickups and stuff work.

please help i am not in urgent need but i would like to get a little head start on this since i am not doing well in this class. for the record i dont even have to know my topic until feb. 13, but if i can have most of my project figured out before then it could end up being much easier.

thanks in advance.
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#2
Quote by kanashibari_man
mods i dont know if this is in the right section of the forums so please feel free to move it if need be.

this year for my honors chemistry class i have to participate in my schools science fair. generally i hate science fairs but this year i decided i'd actually try. firstly i would like to say that i want my project to be based on something that has to do with electric guitar. so some things i thought about are different questions that my project could be about. so here they are ( please answer them if you can and if you have a relevent question that could add to my topic please tell post it. )

1. how are the vibrations in guitar strings converted to sound coming out of the amp

2. does electricity flow through the pickups ( i have passive pickups )

3. can i measure the output coming from the guitar without it being plugged into the amp ( or before that output reaches the amp ), and without taking out my pickups.

4. what do i use to measure this, and what unit will it be in? ( watts, amperes, hertz, etc...)

5. how do different componants of the guitar affect the electrical output of the guitar ( things like: tension of strings, and _____________________________ please add to this list if you can. )

im not new to guitar but i dont understand the electrical aspects of guitar. i know how to play, but i don't know how the pickups and stuff work.

please help i am not in urgent need but i would like to get a little head start on this since i am not doing well in this class. for the record i dont even have to know my topic until feb. 13, but if i can have most of my project figured out before then it could end up being much easier.

thanks in advance.


2.yes, this is generated by the movement of the metasl strings which either moves magnets or something something about electromagnets.
this is how you can plug into an amp and you can hear the sound, it is amplified a tiny bit in the guitar.

Surely this doesnt come up in uni/college chemistry?
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Last edited by nebno6 at Jan 4, 2009,
#3
4. The second part sounds like something a third grader would ask

5. core shape (hex or round), string height
#4
1. Pickups register the flux in their magnetic field caused by the strings' vibration, and convert this to an electrical current that goes into the amp which converts this current back to sound, sometimes adding distortion.

2. It comes from the jack cable that's plugged into your amp. WHich takes up to question
3: you can't measure the output without it being plugged into the amp, since the amp provides the power that drives the output-current.

4 watts and hertz both apply to the amp's analog output (actual sound) and the level in ampere (ohm?) should be stable, so I'm guessing Voltage.

I'm not an expert but this is what I remember from Physics class.
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Last edited by bornfidelity at Jan 4, 2009,
#5
for the first few questions id look up guitar pickups on www.howstuffworks.com or whatever that site is. and yes, you can measure the output of a guitar right from the output jack. you could measure current, voltage, wattage or frequency. though with frequency you probably wouldnt get anything useful without expensive equiptment because it is going to put out a lot of frequencies at once. also, the output is going to be very small because it is just the current produced in the copper wire due to the changing magnetic field.

basicly the best way to go about this is to look up general articles on guitar pickups, then narrow things down to get more info. like search about magnetic flux and induced current once you figure out what those things do in a pickup. start using google/wikipedia/encyclopedias to find the big picture and then work your way into the details.
#6
Make a new pickup out of LED's. One LED under each string senses vibrations of the string and changes it into electrical signals. And YES IT DOES WORK.
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#7
Quote by nebno6
2.yes, this is generated by the movement of the metasl strings which either moves magnets or something something about electromagnets.
this is how you can plug into an amp and you can hear the sound, it is amplified a tiny bit in the guitar.

Surely this doesnt come up in uni/college chemistry?


im a sophmore in highschool. sorry if that was unclear. it probably would come up in college chem. and i cant really understand my teacher ( extremely old and has never finished a sentence, most sentences of his are "so if you have, uh uh. and then one hydrogen, one sulfur, and four oxygens. HSO4- is the compound." and since i cannot understand him i generally dont ask questions that are somewhat off topic. we have learned about wavelength, frequency, and things like that so i have some understanding of what i am trying to learn. )
My Gear:
Schecter Omen 6 ( Seymour Duncan SH - 8 Invader Bridge, GFS Crunchy Rails Neck )
Jackson JS30DKT Dinky™ Hard tail ( Stock Pickups )
Fender Squire Stratocaster ( Stock Pickups )
Vox AD15VT Amplifier