#1
i want to know why from the notes E to F and B to C are only a half step away, i mean, what is the reason for that? it screws me up when im doing scales.
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------

#3
LOL. Yeah. The simple answer is: They just are. Deal with it.

There's some sort of explanation though. It's something like the sound waves between the two tones are shorter or something or there isn't enough leadway to produce a sharp or a flat note inbetween the two...
█████████████████████████████████████████████
█████████████████████████████████████████████
Portugal. The Man »–
#4
man. so like in dropped B or say A, when you down tune the normal G and E strings, does that half step rule still aplly?
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------

#5
its because when they first invented notes......there wasnt flast and sharps
it was just ABCDEFG
then afterwards they realized they could fit more notes in there
but between B and C and E and F was only a half step to begin with
so ya
its complicated
Quote by Valid12891
I wish I had an extra sensitive third nipple, and a girl who was into that sort of thing.

Quote by _Ixnay_
In Russia, Winter Cold + Vodka + Big-Chested Women = No problem.


Book of shadows 2?
O_o
#6
Quote by X Nocturnal X
man. so like in dropped B or say A, when you down tune the normal G and E strings, does that half step rule still aplly?


Yes, always.

AND NOW for a more in-depth answer that may or may not be 100% correct, but at least it makes sense...

There are twelve chromatic notes in the western scale, and only seven letters that the notes can be named with. Mathematically, two of those notes had to have no complimentary "sharp" note, or "in harmoniously" two of those notes could not have a "flat" next to them. There was only so much space in the cross-section of two symbolic systems.
█████████████████████████████████████████████
█████████████████████████████████████████████
Portugal. The Man »–
Last edited by jasonmetal love at Jan 4, 2009,
#7
Quote by jasonmetal love
Yes, always.

AND NOW for a more in-depth answer that may or may not be 100% correct, but at least it makes sense...

There are twelve chromatic notes in the western scale, and only seven letters that the notes can be named with. Mathematically, two of those notes had to have no complimentary "sharp" note, or "in harmoniously" two of those notes could not have a "flat" next to them. There was only so much space in the cross-section of two symbolic systems.

that makes a little more sense. is there any threads on metal (music not the ore) theory?
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------

#8
Quote by X Nocturnal X
that makes a little more sense. is there any threads on metal (music not the ore) theory?


i would think music theory works for all genres. it's the same notes and sounds.
Quote by Joetime
Every time I masturbate it feels like I'm committing a small scale infanticide. Feels cool.
#9
Quote by psychogel
i would think music theory works for all genres. it's the same notes and sounds.

true in some ways, but there are techniques that are used in metal that arent used for like, say jazz.
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------

Last edited by X Nocturnal X at Jan 4, 2009,
#10
Quote by X Nocturnal X
i want to know why from the notes E to F and B to C are only a half step away, i mean, what is the reason for that? it screws me up when im doing scales.




Seriously, just get used to it.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#11
Quote by X Nocturnal X
ture in some ways, but there are techniques that are used in metal that arent used for like, say jazz.


Still the same thing, just different scales used for certain genres a lot of times and just how it is played. Metal uses a lot of minor scales and what not I believe.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#12
i was reading Zeguitarists guide to guitar and just a question:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
\2st/ \2st/ \1st/ \2st/ \2st/ \2st/ \1st/

^^not getting that, what exactly does this mean for a major scale?

[edit] nevermind i got it.
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------

Last edited by X Nocturnal X at Jan 4, 2009,
#13
2 st - 2 half steps
1 st - 1 half step

I guess?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 - intervals.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#14
Quote by jasonmetal love
There are twelve chromatic notes in the western scale, and only seven letters that the notes can be named with.


Actually, we have an available inventory of 26 letters.
#16
Quote by DarTHie
2 st - 2 half steps
1 st - 1 half step

I guess?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 - intervals.

^this,

st = semitone.
Si
#17
Quote by Dodeka
Actually, we have an available inventory of 26 letters.


I was refering to the musical alphabet silly :P
█████████████████████████████████████████████
█████████████████████████████████████████████
Portugal. The Man »–
#18
Quote by jasonmetal love
I was refering to the musical alphabet silly :P


Oh, then ya got me.
#19
Quote by psychogel
i would think music theory works for all genres. it's the same notes and sounds.

Exactly, theory is universal - the nuts and bolts are all the same regardless of genre, it's the way you use them that makes things different.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#20
This actually kind of hard to explain in text but...

The 12 half step chromatic musical scale is completely arbitrary. It has 12 steps because we said it did. They are equal steps because of the physics behind it. A middle C has a certain frequency that it resonates at. Thus an octave above that resonates twice as fast (double the frequency) It would stand to reason that if you were to create a major scale out of that you would have 6 steps right? But because we humans like the rounded sound of the current major scale (again, decided upon arbitrarily over centuries) we include 7 steps. In order to make that extra note fit we've got to have two places in the scale that are only a half step apart.

It could just as easily be 4 more notes that are a quarter step apart, or even more.

If you look at some of the more exotic scales such as Indian, and Chinese musical scale systems they have as many as 24 or 36 notes in them. Because they've taken the octave (which is determined by frequency) and divided them into 24 or 36 different notes.

Our western ears, however, have gotten used to the sound of the major scale as it is and thus it sounds normal to us to have a 7 step scale. But like I said, if we as a species had taken a different route way back at the beginnings of musical notation, and decided on a 12 step chromatic scale and a 6 step major scale we would have a major scale with 6 evenly spaced steps.

Confused?? So am I...
Last edited by Gizzmo0411 at Jan 5, 2009,
#21
Music theory = the same for all western music (Jazz,rock,blues,pop etc.)

Jazz doesn't use different techniques.

Techniques are guitar related and an instrument is just the means to play music.

The different techniques and sounds you can get per instrument is the reason why bands/music consists of different instruments.

It's based on taste and some instruments fit some genre's better because that's what's popular used in that genre.

This doesn't mean you can't play metal riffs on a piano, it's just not considered very tasteful.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#22
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Music theory = the same for all western music (Jazz,rock,blues,pop etc.)

Jazz doesn't use different techniques.

Techniques are guitar related and an instrument is just the means to play music.

The different techniques and sounds you can get per instrument is the reason why bands/music consists of different instruments.

It's based on taste and some instruments fit some genre's better because that's what's popular used in that genre.

This doesn't mean you can't play metal riffs on a piano, it's just not considered very tasteful.

i.e. metal techniques i was kinda referring to: fast picking, pinch harmonics. i know they're not used just for metal, but i meant the theory most used in metal, such as their key/time signatures that most other styles of music dont NORMALLY use.
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------

#23
Quote by X Nocturnal X
i.e. metal techniques i was kinda referring to: fast picking, pinch harmonics. i know they're not used just for metal, but i meant the theory most used in metal, such as their key/time signatures that most other styles of music dont NORMALLY use.



Well what kind of Metal?

Prog Metal uses key signature's as far as 7/8 and 13/16

Death Metal is characterised by the vocals and technical complex time signature changes.

Black Metal = dark and fast tremelo riffs.

Doom Metal is slow and Dark

Math Metal is metal based on Mathematical formula's and patterns
(I'm not making this up)

I seen all guitar techniques being used in metal (two handed tapping, sweeps, pinches, all picking forms, fingerpicking, left and right hand muting, string skipping) LIterally everything + more.

Also I seen Metal songs in every key.

Every musical style has songs in every key.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 5, 2009,
#24
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Well what kind of Metal?

Prog Metal uses key signature's as far as 7/8 and 13/16

Death Metal is characterised by the vocals and technical complex time signature changes.

Black Metal = dark and fast tremelo riffs.

Doom Metal is slow and Dark

Math Metal is metal based on Mathematical formula's and patterns
(I'm not making this up)

I seen all guitar techniques being used in metal (two handed tapping, sweeps, pinches, all picking forms, fingerpicking, left and right hand muting, string skipping) LIterally everything + more.

Also I seen Metal songs in every key.

Every musical style has songs in every key.

lol math metal, mudvayne is math metal i think. yeah i was referring to all those, but not "doom" metal, never even heard of it.
Sing me a new song
A broken song of redemption and regret
Sing me a new song
And beg for all the mercy you can get

--------------------Monty Python and the Holy Grail----------------