#1
i'm a big fan of progmetal and progrock, listen bands like rush,yes,pink floyd, dominici , dream theater, circus maxis, symphony x and other more prog bands, and in the future someday i want to be a prog guitarist, what are some things that i should about progguitar
#2
learn about good rhythm and timing, as u see they are all masters of being able to calculate beat length in all time signatures

also learn lots of theory about scales
#4
yep, know you're theory and time signatures, have fun trying to be a computer for the rest of your musical career
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#5
Quote by mzhang13
Everything, really everything.


Mz is absolutely correct. Progressive music requires a real mastery of the instrument. A range of techniques so diverse and unique that people could tell your style apart from anybody else in the world and a knowledge of scales and modes that makes people in this section drool. You need to be so capable that if you made your songs into sheet music, professional musicians would be speechless.

Get started, and never ever stop.
#7
Quote by colohue
Mz is absolutely correct. Progressive music requires a real mastery of the instrument. A range of techniques so diverse and unique that people could tell your style apart from anybody else in the world and a knowledge of scales and modes that makes people in this section drool. You need to be so capable that if you made your songs into sheet music, professional musicians would be speechless.

Get started, and never ever stop.


That made me want to cry.

I wanted to be a prog guitarist but I dont think I have THAT much dedication.

Or really that much time on my hands..

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
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#8
Quote by valennic
That made me want to cry.

I wanted to be a prog guitarist but I dont think I have THAT much dedication.

Or really that much time on my hands..


u never no the more u play the more u might want to push urself to play harder and harder stuff
#9
If you're into Dream Theater and want an intro to Petrucci's style, check out his Rock Discipline DVD. It's not going to make you awesome overnight, but it's a nice introduction to some interesting techniques.
#11
Quote by progmetalhead12
what some other interesting prog bandsto listen too?


Coheed and Cambria are a good start, they're fairly radio-friendly and do have a few 8+ minute epics (In Keeping Secrets Of Silent Earth). Mars Volta are more jazzy, but still pretty mental and very proggy. For prog death-metal you could check out Opeth, they have a ton of cleaner more mellow sections mixed with death metal and are pretty sweet.

Or for something really interesting, check out Sikth. One word: mental.
#12
Quote by valennic
That made me want to cry.

I wanted to be a prog guitarist but I dont think I have THAT much dedication.

Or really that much time on my hands..


To play progressive music you have to have a ton of options open. Every song you're going to be progressive through different sections, but they all have to be uniform so that a listener can identify them as the same song. It takes incredible decidation. Writing progressive music on your own requires an incredible knowledge of instruments, as The Clansman said. You really do need to know your stuff.

I aim to play progressive music because I enjoy learning theory. However, this has made it impossible for me to find musicians. People who aim for progressive music are rare because of the sheer amount of work needed.

Better to just write music, then see what people call it.
#13
Quote by colohue
To play progressive music you have to have a ton of options open. Every song you're going to be progressive through different sections, but they all have to be uniform so that a listener can identify them as the same song. It takes incredible decidation. Writing progressive music on your own requires an incredible knowledge of instruments, as The Clansman said. You really do need to know your stuff.

I aim to play progressive music because I enjoy learning theory. However, this has made it impossible for me to find musicians. People who aim for progressive music are rare because of the sheer amount of work needed.

Better to just write music, then see what people call it.


I know, but my main issue is the whole theory thing.

I currently dont have enough time on my hands to sit down and learn all that I need to know. I write music on my own, but it's nothing short of mediocre

I would love to play it, as it's my favorite type of music, but I dont know if I have the ability to.

I do that. I write the music then have other people tell me what they think it is

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#14
Theory's a lot easier than you'd think. I learned most of what I know from two sources.

1. Reading threads right here in the Musician Talk Forum. I was wrong a lot, I got shouted at a lot and called an idiot, but I learned from it.

2. The Lessons section. Admittedly most lessons are now being posted in columns, but it's good to check out all the same. Take some twenty minutes a week reading an article and then link it into your practise.

It's never too late to start moving. It's taken me just over two years to become happy with my playing. I'm nowhere near ready to play the sort of music I want to play, but as long as I know where I want to end up, I can break it down and see what I need to do to get there. Give it a try.
#15
Quote by colohue
Theory's a lot easier than you'd think. I learned most of what I know from two sources.

1. Reading threads right here in the Musician Talk Forum. I was wrong a lot, I got shouted at a lot and called an idiot, but I learned from it.

2. The Lessons section. Admittedly most lessons are now being posted in columns, but it's good to check out all the same. Take some twenty minutes a week reading an article and then link it into your practise.

It's never too late to start moving. It's taken me just over two years to become happy with my playing. I'm nowhere near ready to play the sort of music I want to play, but as long as I know where I want to end up, I can break it down and see what I need to do to get there. Give it a try.




I've been feeling a bit unmotivated lately, but with the soon to be addition of a seven string guitar to my arsenal , I'll give this a whirl.

I'd love to be able to do this eventually, and I will definitely give more lessons a read, because I've tried before, but got bored that wont do.

for the help though. And the motivation

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#16
another thing about prog-guitarists, ive noticed alot of them use 7 strings.
i dont have a 7 string but im saving up my money for one, and i really hope it helps me make cooler riffs, and songs for the progressive music im writing.
progressive music is so awsome =]
my 6 best friends:
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LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#18
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
another thing about prog-guitarists, ive noticed alot of them use 7 strings.


The point of that is an extra option.

With progressive music the reason you want to become the best you can is to open up as many options as possible. This gives you the oppurtunity to progress in any of the different directions you've opened up.

@Val - Check out the Crusade articles. Short and sweet, take them one at a time.

@Muscles - I would consider Pink Floyd incredibly talented. Their music goes in many different directions, often at many different times. Jazz and classical music can be very difficult, but the point of progressive music is to open up doors to progress through, which means getting as good as you can be to maximise your potential. Also, Progressive music will never be 'played out' as long as there are people who want to play it. I am one of those people.
#20
what are music should i learn than classical and jazz. i starting to know my jazzbbut what are some different music styles
#21
Quote by progmetalhead12
what are music should i learn than classical and jazz. i starting to know my jazzbbut what are some different music styles


There's this amazing genre called grammar.

Learn it.


If your'e going to play prog though, my guess would be any and every genre you can think of.

That way your possibilities are unlimited.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#22
As has been said, Jazz is a good start. It's very handy for developing interesting chord progressions. Generally you'll want to learn everything you can. Learn some folk music, some country and western, some classic rock, some punk, some medieval/renaissance music.

Open yourself up to all the possibilities. The more you learn the more you can use. You'll get to the point where you'll be playing modern rock and you'll see an opening for a jazz chord and just put it in there because it's going to sound right.
#23
Quote by NiceMuscles Bro


OP, don't get discouraged. Most prog rock isn't even particularly complex, especially when compared to jazz or classical.

Harmonically speaking, certainly, but progressive music can have much more rhythmic complexity than jazz or classical.
Quote by Metalfreak777
Dude if i were you i'd look more at bands like Dragonforce, Dragonland, Dream Theatre and Power Quest, most of their songs are either in E major, A major, C major or D majhor

#24
Quote by colohue
Mz is absolutely correct. Progressive music requires a real mastery of the instrument. A range of techniques so diverse and unique that people could tell your style apart from anybody else in the world and a knowledge of scales and modes that makes people in this section drool. You need to be so capable that if you made your songs into sheet music, professional musicians would be speechless.

Get started, and never ever stop.

I'm... I'm sorry, but that really is beautiful.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#25
Quote by NiceMuscles Bro
What.

...ok, yeah, I'm having a hard time believing you're a regular person. I think you're that troll that popped up a few times in UG.

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what.

Yes...

*reported*
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#28
if you really want to be progressive have a sense of taste. know that just because you can write a 12 minute epic in alternating 3+2/4 and 13/8 doesnt mean you should. Know everything, all kinds of different music from different cultures (though know rock, jazz and classical music like the back of your hand), but dont feel like you have to show what you know in every song. And dont feel like you need a million sections in each song, its always better to have 4 or 5 well developed theames and musical ideas then 20 half baked sections. Most prog guitarists have tons of talent and knowledge, but almost know taste or songwriting ability. If you really want to be progressive, be subtle. Dont force odd tonalities, or mixed meter or anything else 'progy', wait for the time to be right. Sometimes a triad will be sufficient instead of a #9 #11 chord, and sometimes a song will actually call for a 13/8 section; you should be able to know what fits and what doesnt.
Prog is essentially a fusion of popular music (pop, rock, metal etc) with 'art music' (jazz, classical), keep that in mind before you write your 19 minute mixed meter atonal epic.
#29
Quote by SilverDark
I'm... I'm sorry, but that really is beautiful.


Thanks man. It's my opinion.

The Captain is right. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. A lot of people, as an example, go into different time signatures just to show that they can when the song doesn't call for it.

As each song develops the music will tell you where it wants to go. Try a few things and see what works, but the point is not to show off. It's the music that's important.