#1
I know almost nothing when it comes to trems.
Any help? I'm more of an acoustic player.
(Mainly because the only I electric I own is a Wal-Mart First Act and my acoustic is the love of my life Ibanez SGT120)
So any help on this?
#3
Pretty simple. The trem raises or lower your pitch by stretching or releasing tension off the strings. Kind of like doing a bend, but with all strings at once. Some trems are better than others. On some, if you so much as breathe on them, it knocks the guitar out-of-tune. On others, you could sit on the trem and when you released it, it'd go right back to perfect pitch. The Bigsby on my ESP is pretty touchy that way. As long as you don't get too crazy with it, it goes back to tune. Both of my PRSs and my Fender Strat have awesome trems on them.

Does this help at all?
#4
The annoying thing on my Yamaha Pacifica Tremelo bridge is that if I tune a string, it knocks all the others out of tune because it pulls the bridge tighter so it takes ages to tune the whole thing if adding new strings.

PRS pre inotated stop tail bridges FTW!
#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
Pretty simple. The trem raises or lower your pitch by stretching or releasing tension off the strings. Kind of like doing a bend, but with all strings at once. Some trems are better than others. On some, if you so much as breathe on them, it knocks the guitar out-of-tune. On others, you could sit on the trem and when you released it, it'd go right back to perfect pitch. The Bigsby on my ESP is pretty touchy that way. As long as you don't get too crazy with it, it goes back to tune. Both of my PRSs and my Fender Strat have awesome trems on them.

Does this help at all?


It helps a bunch.
A lot really.
Thanks...I knew it had to do with pitch...but that was it... thanks for the help.