#1
I decided to man up and learn some theory. I know all the notes on the fretboard, I learned what intervals are, In learned chromatic approach notes, and I learned R 5 6 and 7s. I am so glad that I learned this stuff because it made everything so much easier. I was jamming with my friend and he was playing some chords and then I played some variations of the R 5 6 and 7s and it sounded great.

My question is that when my friend plays single notes and not these chords, what should I do? He doesn't know which key he is in and that makes it hard. Should I learn theory for guitar as well? I don't want to play the same thing the guitarist is playing. Any thoughts and comments would be appreciated.
#2
You shouldn't play around him. He should be playing around you. You do whatever the hell you want, but keep it coherent and in key and all that good stuff.

What is R 5 6 7? Never heard of it.
Gear...
Peavey 5150, Squier, Ibanez RG2EX2, Yamaha F150, Ibanez RT150, MXR noisegate
Last edited by abcdboy at Jan 4, 2009,
#3
i don't know if this applys to bass(bass clef) and guitar(treble clef) but with tuba(bass clef) and trumpet(treble clef) we play in different keys.
#4
Quote by Haustinj
i don't know if this applys to bass(bass clef) and guitar(treble clef) but with tuba(bass clef) and trumpet(treble clef) we play in different keys.

It doesn't apply, you have to transpose in those instruments IIRC.
#5
Quote by abcdboy
What is R 5 6 7? Never heard of it.



I think he means the 5th 6th and 7th of any root note.
"Rome wasn't built in a week"

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#7
Could anyone help me out?

I've tried to look at songs by R.E.M. to analyze how the bass plays with the guitar, but I'm still confused.
#8
This has already been said, but the guitar should play around you.
All the guitarists I know don't know the first thing about music theory except the name of their strings and I just lay down a solid groove and they make sure they stay in key.
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#9
Learn what notes he is playing. From that you can tell what key it is in.

When you have the key, make-up a progression to go with it. If no chord's are preestablished you need to figure some out, and make them happen. This will make the difference between just playing notes in the key of D, and playing a 1 6 2 5 progression in D.

What I would say you should learn next is chord progressions, and how to apply them to your playing. Because as a bass player you need to make the changes happen.

And remember, Bass is the Boss.