#2
Well, that's a PA system so it's designed for live use and as such it won't have any on-board recording gear...What I'm trying to say is, when people buy a mixer to connect to a computer and record, usually it is a mixer designed for recording digitally.

Your soundcard will still affect the sound, because the mixers designed for recording have on-board A/D converters bypassing the sound card on your computer and instead going straight to whatever DAW (recording program) you are using.

In short: No, it won't help you and it isn't what you're looking for. Unless you are looking to record a drum kit, your best bet is to buy a decent USB (or if possible, firewire) interface with a couple of XLR inputs and some line-in jacks. These days you can get a decent one with phantom power, and a 24-bit bandwidth, for not too much more than that mixer.


Also, bear in mind that what you're looking at there is designed to amplify the sound coming into it, to a giggable volume. When recording digitally, you don't require any extra volume than the source you are recording unless you want to destroy your ears when mixing/mastering the tracks.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jan 4, 2009,
#3
well i am planning on getting this pa system for live use mainly but i am also wondering if theres anything i could use to improve my computerts ability to record

so if i do get this p.a. is there anything else i can buy that i would be able to improve my computers abilty to record using both the mixer and another thing?
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
Fender FM 212
Boss ME-50
#4
Yeah, what you want is basically the interface I described. What sort of budget would you have, on top of the mixer? And bear in mind that to get a good quality you need a decent computer (if it's more than 2 years old, chances are it's already too clogged up to record to a professional standard unless it was a very expensive comp!) but I manage on an Apple iMac with 2gb RAM and a 2.6GHz cpu just fine.

Do you own a recording program (Cubase, Ableton Live, Pro Tools etc.) , also?
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#5
yea i have cubase and a bunch of other recording programs. my computer has 750 mb of ram and i have no clue about the GHz :S
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
Fender FM 212
Boss ME-50
#6
Ok, well 750mb of RAM probably isn't enough to track too many instruments/inputs at once but RAM is fairly cheap to upgrade if you have any problems. So far with 2Gb of RAM I've had no latency issues (lag) anyway.

The main problem for you if you intend to record drums as part of the band, is that if you simply use the PA mixer and connect it up to a small interface via the left and right audio channel outs from the PA or similar, is that then you only have two input channels to work with from whatever you record.

In other words, you wouldn't have a separately recorded track for each mic like in a professional studio, but you would literally have a left and a right of whatever is panned to each side.

Basically, you need a combined mixer/interface with at least 8 inputs and they're fairly expensive whether firewire or USB. I'd suggest you consider which is more important - a live PA or the ability to record well.

I can suggest if you choose a digital interface though, something like this (sorry that it's in £ and EUR, I'm from the UK and don't know the best US sites for gear). Then you can mic up the drums as the general standard these days (7 mics) and have another input if you want to lay down the bass at the same time. Then you would record the other instruments individually while using headphones to play back/monitor both the recorded tracks and what is being recorded.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jan 4, 2009,
#7
if anything i would just do a drum track in midi and use Ez Drummer to do the drums, and my drummer has an electric drumset. but my soundcrad doesn't sound too good and i am wondering what i have to upgrade to get better sound?
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
Fender FM 212
Boss ME-50
#8
Oh, if you're not needing to record drums that makes it alot easier I'm glad to say. All you need is a simple one or two input interface and there's tons on the market. If you have a firewire port on your computer, go for something like this or this.

If you only have USB (don't worry, the quality is still high, but firewire is arguably more stable and a bit faster) then you could try this or this.

USB interfaces are quite a lot cheaper, due to their slightly lower quality, but by all means you can still get a good quality recording the USB way.

If you buy either of those, they will bypass your computer's soundcard and use their own onboard converters and that should solve your issue of sound quality... providing you now buy a decent mic


And as a random point of interest, to get a better sound essentially what you're upgrading are the A/D and D/A (analogue to digital, digital back to analogue) converters being used by the recording program. If you want to know how that works I'll gladly answer, if you don't already know, but it's quite science-y stuff that may just bore you haha.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jan 4, 2009,