#2
to shift your pitch

Pretty self explanatory
Call me Wes.
Gear:
Fender American Deluxe HSS Strat
Chicago Blues Box Roadhouse
Bad Cat Cougar 5
1957 Gibson GA-5
Ceriatone 18w TMB Combo
Hughes & Kettner Tube Factor
Various Ibanez TS9s
Weber MASS Attenuator
#3
Basically what it sounds like. It takes a note you play and outputs a different note. The best pedals to do this are whammy pedals (i.e., Digitech Whammy) or octave pedals (i.e., Boss OC-2, Boss OC-3). You can have a lot of fun with these effects but it takes some practice to get the desired effects
#5
I was just jesting a bit. Trippy got it right, though.
Call me Wes.
Gear:
Fender American Deluxe HSS Strat
Chicago Blues Box Roadhouse
Bad Cat Cougar 5
1957 Gibson GA-5
Ceriatone 18w TMB Combo
Hughes & Kettner Tube Factor
Various Ibanez TS9s
Weber MASS Attenuator
#6
the practical use is that if you want to play 2 notes at once, you can. like a harmony.

is this for real? its fairly obvious isnt it???
Cursed to one day crash and burn because we fly so god damn high.
#7
There are several types of effects that technically fall under the "pitch shifter" category. I commonly use programs in my G-Major that shift the entire thing up or down a half step. Then there are harmonizers, whammies, octaves, and the like.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#8
pitch shifters serve a different purpose depending on the mix of wet/dry signal actually used. If using none of the dry, it can be thought of us as moving the key you are playing in...intelligent pitch shifters can even make choices moving a soung from minor to major and vice versa. on the other hand, if you are mixing a lot of the dry signal in, then the pedal will create a thicker, fuller sound by adding a harmony...which may be consonant or dissonant based on the settings your choose. can give the impression of two players when really only one is playing.

i personally like the ps-5 from BOSS