#1
I used to anchor because of the stability it provided, but I stopped a few months ago. I've gotten back to my old speed, but I'm noticing that I'm using my arm as well as my wrist (not a significant amount, but I can't just use 100% wrist movement, the elbow doesn't lock unless I put tension, but that's bad also). To fix this, I've just been playing slower and trying to isolate the movement. Yet, whenever I switch strings, my arm moves automatically, because if I just use my wrist, the arc that the pic swings gives me different accents on different strings. EG. on low e, the angle is 0, on a, the angle is 10, on d the angle is 25, if you get what I'm saying. How do I avoid this if I am to use just my wrist? Also, should I use ONLY my wrist, or is arm movement ok?

Thank you, and I'm sure this question's been asked before, so I apologize.
#2
There is no one way to pick correctly, it's whatever you're comfortable with. With guitar, there's no formal way of playing (unless you're a classical player).
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#3
I never heard anything about arm mobement being bad. I know some people says anchoring restricts you movement but as long as you can play and your comfortable, dont worry about it.
I hate my sig
#5
Ah, that's a little reassuring. However, I have a follow-up question. Does the picking arm always stay coplanar to the guitar? For example, when I try to pick fast (I'm talking 100 bpm :-/ yeah I know), I "dig" into the string and there's "y"-movement, aka, my picking hand actually moves up and down a little. Is this bad, and should the picking hand always stay constant except for wrist rotation?
#6
No, a little y is fine (good even, imho), just don't let it get too much. EJ would recommend the tone of that style of picking, if you want to hear more about it maybe talk to ProphetofPage (Tom ) and he can fill you in.
#7
Quote by fnmpm
For example, when I try to pick fast (I'm talking 100 bpm :-/ yeah I know),

Is that supposed to be a joke? 100 bpm is fairly slow.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#9
16th notes at 100bpm is difficult for me, is that honestly slow?
#10
^ not really. It's what you'd call mid-tempo. And in the grand scheme of things (I'm guessing 70 or 80% of music), you rarely have to play much faster than that, other than the odd fast run or two.

If you can play really clean and in control doing 16ths at 100, then you have a great foundation to build on if you want to do faster stuff later (as opposed to say, playing really sloppily at 180 and having to spend tons of time cleaning everything up before you can do anything that sounds nice with it).
#12
Ah, thanks. Man, its great to have you guys here, I wouldn't know what to do without U-G.

On a sidenote, do you think its bad to tackle songs ahead of your league? For example, I'm working on Neil Zaza's I'm alright and Petrucci's Glasgow Kiss.
#13
Quote by fnmpm
16th notes at 100bpm is difficult for me, is that honestly slow?

Speed doesn't matter much.
If you can Play A highly complicated piece at that speed, its better than me playing an extremely easy piece or simple scale at 30NPS.

16th notes at 100 BPM, thats roughly 6 to 7 notes per second. If your playing a piece of something like bach, or Mozart at that speed, thats awesome, if your just doing scales... Well...