#1
What I mean, is the way you can play a certain passage.
Horizontal being:
E|--12---13---12---10---8---7---5---4----|


Vertical being:

E|--12---13--12---10-----------------------|
B|-------------------------13---12---10----|
G|---------------------------------------13|


So I personally prefer the vertical way of playing the passage. However, I see that many people use the horizontal way, including many famous players. My question is why? Don't you have to move your hand way more, and isn't it harder?

Also, what way do you use?

EDIT: These parts are from "Stratovarius - Stratosphere"
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Last edited by urik at Jan 5, 2009,
#2
Depends on the context, if the next note is around the 4th fret then the first option is probably preferable. Also it depends on the sound you want....if you wanted a staccato, palm muted sound you'd use the second option, if you wanted a smoother, slidey legato sound you're perhaps better off using the first option.
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#3
Well, if the rest of the passage is played on the lower frets, then the first option is preferred. If it's a very fast passage, you have no choice but to use the second option. So really, each option is only better depending on the context.
#4
Timbre

If you listen closely, the same note sounds different on different strings, due to the thickness of the string and the place over the pickup.

This is almost always the reason why people choose it, and people who write guitar stuff on gp are usually not aware of this

It's 1 of the things what separates an good guitarist from the best.

EDIT:

Especially in instrumental rock you can recognize for example Petrucci playing all his melody lines as much as he can on the g string because it gives the fattest sound of the unwound string.

It's a small detail, but all those kinds of small details (like pick angles also and dynamics) added up are part of a guitar style. And 1 of the reasons why I can usually tell if someone wrote something in GP or actually sat down with his guitar.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 5, 2009,
#6
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Timbre

If you listen closely, the same note sounds different on different strings, due to the thickness of the string and the place over the pickup.

This is almost always the reason why people choose it, and people who write guitar stuff on gp are usually not aware of this

It's 1 of the things what separates an good guitarist from the best.

+1

Sometimes when you change string (especially if you don't have the best guitar/strings on) it can ruin the continuity because of the sudden change in timbre.

One example that stuck in my mind was how one of the guitarists in the strokes (can't remember which one) played the lead line to 12:51 entirely on the G string. I also remember that one because they actually wrote it changing strings in the tab book .
#7
Quote by steven seagull
Depends on the context, if the next note is around the 4th fret then the first option is probably preferable. Also it depends on the sound you want....if you wanted a staccato, palm muted sound you'd use the second option, if you wanted a smoother, slidey legato sound you're perhaps better off using the first option.

This is how it continues so yes, there the 1st way would be better:
E|--5--8--7--5--4--7--5--4--5--8--7--5--4--7--5--4--5--8--7--5--7--10--8--7--8--12--10--8--9--12--10-----
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
G|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

However, if I play it this way, the 2nd way would be better, so why don't they do it?

E|------------------------------------------------------------------------------7--10--8--7--8--12--10--8--9--12--10--9--
B|--10--13--12--10--9--12--10--9--10--13--12--10--9--12--10--9--10--13--12--10-------------------------------------------
G|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
D|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Thanks for the timbre answer. However, isn't there any other reason? I mean, it sounds way less fluid (at least for me) with the horizontal way.
Another thing. For someone trained in the horizontal way, is it as easy with the vertical way?
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#9
Quote by urik

Thanks for the timbre answer. However, isn't there any other reason? I mean, it sounds way less fluid (at least for me) with the horizontal way.
Another thing. For someone trained in the horizontal way, is it as easy with the vertical way?


You make a word error. It doesn't sound less fluid on itself.

It sounds less fluid, because you can't play it fluid in that way.

People use it on 1 string as sense of unity and sound timbre.

You can also play something different because of it being more comfortable, it's just that you need to be aware if it changes the sound in a way that's less pleasing to you.

In your case the comfortable example sounds more fluid to you, then you should go with that 1. Maybe in 10 years or something you like the other example for it's sound better, you never know. Just stick what sounds best to you AT THE CURRENT MOMENT, which is the comfortable one.


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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 5, 2009,
#10
Ok thanks guys. Very helpful answers.
I think that I will work on my horizontal skills so I'll be able to play one day those crazy one string licks.
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#11
this is kinda along the same lines but, what are some good exercises to help deevelope playing up and down the neck rather than just "box playing" across the string? Im getting better at it but I want to develope that more.
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#12
Quote by MOOSE_CCR99
this is kinda along the same lines but, what are some good exercises to help deevelope playing up and down the neck rather than just "box playing" across the string? Im getting better at it but I want to develope that more.

Mmh as I stated, I'm not good at one string stuff. But I'd try
E| ---1---2---3---4---------2---3---4---5------3---4---5---6----...

Then
E| ---1---2---3---4-----3---4---5---6-----5---6---7---8---9----...

E| ---1---2---3---4-----4---5---6---7-----7---8---9---10----11...

Also go backwards.
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#13
Quote by michal23
^ That is also true. I very rarely solo on the bottom string for this reason.

knowing your guitar setup can help this. when recording i usually use normal (ie really thick .70 - .11) for rhythm, then i'll drop the gauge down considerably for recording the leads (like 52 - 09's) those thinner strings will take up a different sonic range. it also works wonders to have a lead guitarist use thinner strings and a rhythm guitarist to use thicker strings on a live set.