#1
I practice on upwards of 3-4 hours a day. I have a metronome but I get bored using it, and all I use it for is straight 16ths runs. I can't use a metronome for other things, like songs' it is too hard. I usually keep good rhythm in my head. I am worried though, since I am going to be joining a jazz band and a rock in the next couple weeks should I learn how to use a metronome? Any suggestions to help would be gladly accepted... please help.
#2
metronomes are a man's best friend, use them.
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#3
YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES!
You MUST use a metronome.

They are used mainly for increasing speed. But set a metronome to a silly time signature and have a play with that. The more time sigs you're comfortable with, especially in a jazz band, the better suited you'll be.
#4
Yeah, I'll have to agree with these guys. You can never go wrong with a metronome. It'll only improve your timing.
#5
Yeah, its hard for me though. It's like you need to relearn everything, ya know? How should I start out? will it get easier in time? Will I develop natural rhythm over time?
#6
Well I understand how it can be hard if your using it during a song. But you just really need to get locked in to it. Try to find the rhythm, and stay with it. But just to clear things up, are you talking about like, strumming, or soloing, or both?
#7
I don't use one much but they are great for your playing. I tend to practise with delay on though, and because that's a time orientated effect it tends to have the same result.
#8
Quote by tele432
Well I understand how it can be hard if your using it during a song. But you just really need to get locked in to it. Try to find the rhythm, and stay with it. But just to clear things up, are you talking about like, strumming, or soloing, or both?


Strumming I can usually keep good rhythm to, but soloing gets hard for me, as well as just flat out playing some riffs with notes like e-q-q-e-e-e I get mixed up with quarter notes and eights. It's hard for me to keep timing with note values.
#9
Quote by Viking_Panda
I practice on upwards of 3-4 hours a day. I have a metronome but I get bored using it, and all I use it for is straight 16ths runs.

That will become a big problem one day.

Anyways, you will never get perfect rythm without a metronome. I can bet that if you listened to ONLY the guitar part on Slipknot songs, you won't be able to find the rythm. That's because they play "against the beat". No, they don't play off-time, they just don't play on the accent note. I bet if you tried to keep the beat while they're playing, you'll say that the beat is with them, not with the actuall rythm. Al DiMeola(spelling?) is very good at explaining this. I saw it in a video once, but I can't find it right now. Terrible internet connection at the time.
#10
Ah, I see what you are talking about now. All though it would be advised to use a metronome, maybe I may have to say you can not use it for now. At least untill you have the solo down solid. Because trying to worry about the notes and the timing can get hard and complicated. But once you get the fingering and notes down good, then try to perfect the timing with a metronome. That's just my advice... Plus it sounds like you got a pretty good handle down on timing, even without the metronome.

Edit: I'm talking to you, Viking_Panda
Last edited by tele432 at Jan 5, 2009,
#11
By the way, another trick you should use that I started doing a couple of years ago, listen to the drums (and to some extent, the bass as well) when you're listening to music. I'm not saying ONLY listen to the drums and don't listen to anything else, but pay more attention to them and sometimes focus hard on them to try and get an idea of what the beats are like in songs.

It's a great way of understanding applied rhythm and it will help you to lock into bass and drums much better, if you need to. A guitar player that doesn't listen to me or the drummer is one of the most annoying things musically because it means that they aren't really feeling the song. That's the good thing about playing bass or drums; you're part of that rhythm so you're always picking up on it in some way.
#12
Just think that the metronome is your drummer. Play a song over it until you have the feeling that your drummer is good
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Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#13
Quote by Viking_Panda
... I usually keep good rhythm in my head.
This can sometimes be the problem.
I think most people notice (I certainly did) that when they start using a metronome, it's hard to begin with. That's because they believe they have good timing in their head, but are infact wrong.
#14
The metronome is even better than a real drummer: it'll never go out of time, show up late for a gig, and you never have to pay hospital bills when you throw it down a flight of stairs.


Try this. Set the metronome to the tempo of the song you want to play, count in and play it.

Click-Click-Click-Click

Then set the metronome to half the speed and count every click as the first and third beat and play it again.

Click - 2 - Click - 4

Then half the speed again (if the metronome lets you)

Click - 2 - 3 -4


For jazz you want the same thing except for the 2nd and 4th beat. My teacher had me play songs with the metronome clicking on every 4th beat.. it literally beat good rhythm out of me.

1 - 2 - 3 - Click
#15
Quote by ChrisN

I think most people notice (I certainly did) that when they start using a metronome, it's hard to begin with. That's because they believe they have good timing in their head, but are infact wrong.

I commend you for your wisdom
My Gear:
Fender Stratocaster Deluxe HSS
Hagstrom HIIN
Crate Palomino V32H w/ matching cab.
Roland Cube 60
Roland Micro Cube
BOSS ME-20
Digitech Bad Monkey
Art and Lutherie acoustic