#1
Alright, so I checked for an FAQ and I checked the first couple pages of the searchbar for this one, and no dice. Soooo...

Out of curiosity, why are they where they are? I understand the double dots being at fret 12 as that's the second octave.. but the rest I don't really get. I figured it'd be at whole note invervals, but given the strings are 5 semi-tones apart that kills that theory.
Quote by Marcel Veltman
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#2
probably just to help differentiate them - if you look on large tables / data sheets or whatever, every other line is usually shaded in so you can identify it faster.

In the same way, if 3 5 7 etc are marked in someway, it gives you some sort of landmark to find the frets quickly
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#3
Quote by PuppetMaster91
probably just to help differentiate them - if you look on large tables / data sheets or whatever, every other line is usually shaded in so you can identify it faster.

In the same way, if 3 5 7 etc are marked in someway, it gives you some sort of landmark to find the frets quickly



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#6
Quote by irishman
i thought they were there to let you know where the main harmonics were

does it have anything to do with nodes? i was reading a theory book (and im a noob at theory) but i kind of thought because of the sound waves of the strings they were marked in that way.

oh and it could help with Tap harmonics a lot...but that has nothing to do with why they are the way they are.

maybe someone with more knowlegde on theory can answer the question but i was thinking they had to do with nodes.
Last edited by xXMetal-HeadXx at Jan 6, 2009,
#7
Quote by vegetable-jim
Theres your answer

Is it? 3, 5, 7, 12, 15, 17, 19, 22, 24 seems like a strange pattern to me. Why not just 2, 4, 6, 8, etc? Or 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, etc? Or 3, 6, 9, 12? Those are all logical patterns. The pattern they chose had to have some sort of significance I think.
#8
@Jim85IROC

Well, those patterns are linear so yes, they're logical, but they don't make much sense musically. The frets I most consistently see dotted are the 5th, 7th and 12th frets. These are a perfect 4th, 5th and 8th from what the string is tuned to so not only do these frets give harmonics, they are also neat to use as reference point.

After all, when you want to figure out "where you are" or anything like that, a 5th up from G would probably be easier for most to use as reference point then a major 6th or a tritone from G.


EDIT: wrote perfect 12th instead of 8th :P
Last edited by descara at Jan 6, 2009,
#9
Quote by Jim85IROC
Is it? 3, 5, 7, 12, 15, 17, 19, 22, 24 seems like a strange pattern to me. Why not just 2, 4, 6, 8, etc? Or 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, etc? Or 3, 6, 9, 12? Those are all logical patterns. The pattern they chose had to have some sort of significance I think.


See, that's what I was thinking.

The double dot at 12 makes perfect sense any way you see it.. but 3, 5, 7, 9.. again, perfect sense. At first I thought it might've been noting the whole note increments (given it's mostly every two notes, but of course there's E going straight to F.. which'd explain where it goes off from just every two), but that theory goes off before the 9th fret marker and doesn't really work in any case on other strings than low E.

I think the "it's easier to see" thing makes the most sense.. the 3,5,7,9,12 thing does I suppose give you an easier way to work out where you are.. if it went 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 then it'd just be in two's gaps and that wouldn't really give you a sense of where you are whereas you can work out.. oh, first marker = 3, 2nd marker = 5, last marker before bigger gap between 12 = 9 and so on.

It does make sense when you think about it.. I always just figured it was more significant than that.

EDIT:

Quote by descara
@Jim85IROC

Well, those patterns are linear so yes, they're logical, but they don't make much sense musically. The frets I most consistently see dotted are the 5th, 7th and 12th frets. These are a perfect 4th, 5th and 12th from what the string is tuned to so not only do these frets give harmonics, they are also neat to use as reference point.

After all, when you want to figure out "where you are" or anything like that, a 5th up from G would probably be easier for most to use as reference point then a major 6th or a tritone from G.


Aha, now that's what I was looking for.
Quote by Marcel Veltman
Being a rather mediocre musician myself, I'm all on the hand of Haanz.

Guitar:
MIM '09 Fender Telecaster
Laney VC15-110 Old English White '10
Freshman FOP1DN Acoustic

Bass:
Ibanez SRX590
Laney RB4
Tech21 SansAmp BassDriver DI
Boss ODB-3
Last edited by Haanz at Jan 6, 2009,
#10
They make perfect sense - no point in marking the 1st fret because its right next to the headstock which is distinguished enough
you only need to distinguish frets which are in between other frets...so every other fret

Twelve must be an exception as the OP said it is a new octave -> two markers, and the two blank frets to either side of it can be distinguished as the 11th and 13th frets are 'one away from the fret with two markers' and the 10th and 14th are one away from the 9th and 15th frets respectively
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#12
Quote by Grown
notes in the pentatonic scale.


Holy crap... I didn't even notice that...
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#13
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Holy crap... I didn't even notice that...


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#14
Quote by Grown
:takes bow:



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#15
i was gonna say it's mostly whole notes
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#16
I agree with the above I think its mostly so that you can count frets quickly, if the werent there I shudder to think how long it would take to find the correct fret
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