#1
first post (besides the introduction post)

im a newbie starting out, and i have a couple questions. i have been studying music theory ALOT for about a month now, my bass guitar will be here tomorrow.....my question is this:

if i have say 1 hour, or 2 hours for the day to practice playing, WHAT should i be practicing? should i write my practice session out ahead of time? what the best way to maximize the time you have, but still have alot of fun?


second question is much less serious, what is the best "bass" magazine? if i wanna subscribe to one.
#3
practice some songs,scales.
then after learn theory (with aid from instrument if you need it)
and things about bass'

no idea
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
#5
Quote by pwrmax
Scales, arpeggios, get a book of full of exercises. Try learning songs you like.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw_3_13?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=bass+guitar+exercises&sprefix=bass+guitar+e


This.

If you need a book, get The Complete Idiot's Guide to Playing Bass Guitar or Bass Guitar for Dummies. It has a lot of theory and stuff that would be useful for you.
#6
You should spend a good part of your practice on scales, arpeggio practice and building basic technique. Then find songs that help you master and use the knowledge that you are building.

A good book series to do this is Hal Leonards Bass Method I - III.

In the past I would have recommended Bass Player magazine, but the past 18 months have been really disappointing. I've been getting the UK magazine Bass Guitar and its actually been a better read as of late.
#7
thanks for all the input guys. so it looks like overwhelming you guys recommend scales.....ill definetly do ALOT of work on those as a base. i got bass guitar for dummies pdf yesterday, so ill definetly check that out as well.

i have spent a ton of time learn/memorize the notes on the Bass Clef , and have them to where i can name them in about a second when i see them, anyone have any tips for memorizing the notes on the fingerboard well?
#8
^^ play the note and say it out loud.

its how I did it, its how I'm gonna teach some little kid how to do it

during the lesson I'll randomly get them to name the notes as they're playing.

so, for about, 5 minutes a day do that, and in not very long you'll have a good idea of where you are on the neck.
"Whats that noise??"

"... Jazz"
#9
Quote by Hayden06f4i
thanks for all the input guys. so it looks like overwhelming you guys recommend scales.....ill definetly do ALOT of work on those as a base. i got bass guitar for dummies pdf yesterday, so ill definetly check that out as well.

i have spent a ton of time learn/memorize the notes on the Bass Clef , and have them to where i can name them in about a second when i see them, anyone have any tips for memorizing the notes on the fingerboard well?


Good move. Try to avoid tab until you can read music no problem.
#10
Quote by Hayden06f4i
thanks for all the input guys. so it looks like overwhelming you guys recommend scales.....ill definetly do ALOT of work on those as a base. i got bass guitar for dummies pdf yesterday, so ill definetly check that out as well.

i have spent a ton of time learn/memorize the notes on the Bass Clef , and have them to where i can name them in about a second when i see them, anyone have any tips for memorizing the notes on the fingerboard well?


Sounds like you have the right ideas.

As a general help to music theory, I would recommend the resources (particularly the trainers) on the site Musictheory.net

To keep things fun, I recommend two things: scour the forum here for easy songs by artists or bands that you like and learn these a the same time, and also if you have any friends who play music, jam with them and try to apply the things you are learning.

Practicing scales is a lot more fun if you're doing it in a musical context as opposed to just running up and down them. If you can't find anyone to jam with, then you can find backing tracks to play along to as well.