#3
emmm? what?
1. You're surfing the internet.
2. You're browsing through the UG forums.
3. You're reading now.
5. You didn't notice that there was no #4.
6. You just checked it.
7. Now you're having a lil smile.

Quote by hawk_kst
You Sir, have the best signature like ever!
#5
If your writing a song you decide the length of the note
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


People
should
smile
more



crit4crit on 'acoustic 1 (with piano)' here



Rate my playing skills please.
#6
Sorry, I meant like a single beat

You hear people say hold it for four beats, how do you work out how long that beat is?

A whole note is four beats right?

So how do you work out how long that beat is?
Last edited by SlayedInTheFace at Jan 6, 2009,
#7
Quote by SlayedInTheFace
Sorry, I meant like a single beat

You hear people say hold it for four beats, how do you work out how long that beat is?

You get a metronome.
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab
#8
You've got a various collection of Note Values at your disposal.

4/4 timing means that there a 4 notes in one measure, and you've got your quarter note equals one beat. So 4 quarter notes equals one measure.

Whole notes = 4 beats
Half Notes = 2 beats
Quarter = 4
Eight = 8
Sixteenth = 16
Thirty-Second = 32

So say you've got

Q Q E E S S S S
Quarter-Quarter-Eighth-Eighth-Sixteenth-Sixteenth-Sixteenth-Sixteenth-

It's pretty simple math. You've got 4 beats in that measure. Then you have two quarters, which are two quarters of it, then two eights, which are two eights of it, so far you've filled up 3 quarters, then four 16ths of it, or another whole quarter. So 4 quarters.
#10
Quote by Gizmo Factory
You've got a various collection of Note Values at your disposal.

4/4 timing means that there a 4 notes in one measure, and you've got your quarter note equals one beat. So 4 quarter notes equals one measure.

Whole notes = 4 beats
Half Notes = 2 beats
Quarter = 4
Eight = 8
Sixteenth = 16
Thirty-Second = 32

So say you've got

Q Q E E S S S S
Quarter-Quarter-Eighth-Eighth-Sixteenth-Sixteenth-Sixteenth-Sixteenth-

It's pretty simple math. You've got 4 beats in that measure. Then you have two quarters, which are two quarters of it, then two eights, which are two eights of it, so far you've filled up 3 quarters, then four 16ths of it, or another whole quarter. So 4 quarters.


yea, but im asking, how long are those beats?

Also I think you got the note thing wrong, a quarter is one, eigth is .5 etc.
Last edited by SlayedInTheFace at Jan 6, 2009,
#13
Quote by SlayedInTheFace
yea, but im asking, how long are those beats?

Also I think you got the note thing wrong, a quarter is one, eigth is .5 etc.


Ah you're right. I meant to say Eight = 1/8 not 8 Beats. Same for 16 and 32. Sorry.

But anyway, if you hear the countoff of a song. Count out loud 1 2 3 4, at the exact same speed as the count off, or the metronome.

You can have those four counts equal quarters.

So if you have a whole note you play it on the 1 count and hold for four beats.

1 2 3 4
O-------


If you've got eight eigth notes you count 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & cutting the 1 2 3 4 in half, in a sense.

1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &
O O O O O O O O
Last edited by Gizmo Factory at Jan 6, 2009,
#14
take your BPM, divide it by 60, and four of those beats is a measure in your standard 4/4 time signature
#15
Quote by SlayedInTheFace
Sorry, I meant like a single beat

You hear people say hold it for four beats, how do you work out how long that beat is?

A whole note is four beats right?

So how do you work out how long that beat is?



To understand things like that you need to go back and learn your basics.

Mel Bay book 1 (or any decent method book). Note values
shred is gaudy music
#16
Quote by Gizmo Factory
Ah you're right. I meant to say Eight = 1/8 not 8 Beats. Same for 16 and 32. Sorry.


We see where you're going. You meant a quarter is 1/4 of a measure in four four time.

Anywho, as previously said, get a metronome or tap your foot to the beat. Don't get all mathematical about it, just get the beat in your head and know that a quarter is a standard beat, and eighth is half, a half note is 2 beats and a whole note is 4.
#17
Quote by pandora_grunt
take your BPM, divide it by 60, and four of those beats is a measure in your standard 4/4 time signature

throw that noise out the window. Don't try to find an amount of time that a beat would last, wtf are you thinking telling him that? how many of us can accurately measure in our heads how long to hold something in milliseconds?

GET a metronome. Set it to beep out 4/4 time and a whole note will be four beeps of the metronome. You'll pick it up quickly..... hopefully
#18
Quote by pandora_grunt
take your BPM, divide it by 60, and four of those beats is a measure in your standard 4/4 time signature


Or go the other way around and divide 60 by the BPM for the duration of a beat.
#19
The only reason you would need to know the exact time in seconds of a beat would maybe be to program something into a computer. But aside from that. Just keep a beat.
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab