#1
I'm not sure how this site will react to this, considering they usually only have piano and bass tabs.... but could anyone explain to me how to read piano tabs, if they knew how?

http://www.pianotabs.net/tabs/g/gun_nove.txt

http://www.pianotabs.net/tabs/g/gun_estr.txt

november rain and estranged, to be specific
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#3
Quote by AbombO.S.


I'd just learn to read sheet music to be honest with you.... that looks more confusing to me



haha, I can read sheet music, but I don't want to go out and buy it lol.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#4
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
haha, I can read sheet music, but I don't want to go out and buy it lol.



hmm thats true, see if you cant find a midi file for it and try a trial version of NWC to get it in to notation that might be easier for you lol
#6
Great! Now we can have a whole generation of keyboardists who are just as musically illiterate as us guitarists!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
^haha awesome!!

Just put it on and work it out by listening. It might take a while but you will be a better musician at the end of it.
Si
#8
Ear owns all.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#9
Piano tabs? From the looks of it, piano tablature IS sheet music, just a more retarded way of arranging it.

Guitar tablature makes sense, because its much more straightforward for beginning guitarists who might get frustrated translating sheet music to the fretboard, but piano? There is no logical way of laying out the piano keys to make it any simpler.

Wait I have an idea to improve it. Similar to guitar tabs, you list the keys vertically on the left, then every time you have to strike a key, put an X on that line. Unfortunately you have to turn the page every four measures.
Last edited by Monsterhog at Jan 7, 2009,
#10
Quote by axemanchris
Great! Now we can have a whole generation of keyboardists who are just as musically illiterate as us guitarists!

CT

I doubt this will become very popular, or stop many keyboardists learning sheet music.

One of the hard things about learning sheet music for guitarists is that you have to learn all the notes on the guitar. The fact that there are so many notes to learn on guitar (because the same note is repeated) and that there is no regular pattern means that learning all the notes of the fretboard is just a bit more work that a lot of guitarists are willing to put in.

On the other hand, piano has a regular pattern of where the notes are so you only have to learn to name 11 notes then just repeat them. This makes learning sheet music so much easier. With tab having lost the advantage of being a lot easier thatn sheet, the lack of rythmic notation would probably be enough to make a lot of keyboardists learn sheet.

Also, the fact that lots of people start off learning classical music, and that piano hasn't been glorified like guitar has (eg. Guitar Hero, keyboard isn't even included) which means that people who learn it will usually be more about the music and less about showing than some guitarists, are other reasons why I doubt piano tab will become that popular.
#11
It doesn't look quite as user-friendly as Klavar notation link.


I would rather use a Jankó-type keyboard than the illogical traditional keyboard, so I'd favor something closer to this 6-6 Klavar notation link, only perhaps the horizontal staff version with C using a white note.
Last edited by Dodeka at Jan 7, 2009,
#12
I have used both standard notation an piano tabs. Piano tabs are pretty easy once you get used to it. Piano tabs are probably used mostly by beginners because you don't have to constantly remember how many sharps/flats in the key. std notation is still the best though
#14
Quote by one vision
I'm sorry, that's just ridiculous. It's like writing everything phonetically as opposed to using a proper spelling system.


Purely phonetic spellings are impractical, but phonemic spellings would work well.
#15
Quote by Dodeka
It doesn't look quite as user-friendly as Klavar notation link.


I would rather use a Jankó-type keyboard than the illogical traditional keyboard, so I'd favor something closer to this 6-6 Klavar notation link, only perhaps the horizontal staff version with C using a white note.


I pretty much described that above, although I was being sarcastic, because I didn't think such a thing could exist. Way impractical. Although, it is more user friendly. Do the inventors of this system realize its just sheet music turned sideways with extra symbols so beginners know EXACTLY where on the keyboard they are? Why not just LEARN which note locations on the staff correspond to which keys.

I think sheet music's benefit of easily recognizable note durations (quarters, eigths, sixteenths, etc) far outweighs the "benefit" of this notation having references such as the middle 'c' dashed lines...
Last edited by Monsterhog at Jan 7, 2009,
#16
Quote by Monsterhog
I pretty much described that above, although I was being sarcastic, because I didn't think such a thing could exist. Way impractical. Although, it is more user friendly. Do the inventors of this system realize its just sheet music turned sideways with extra symbols so beginners know EXACTLY where on the keyboard they are? Why not just LEARN which note locations on the staff correspond to which keys.

I think sheet music's benefit of easily recognizable note durations (quarters, eigths, sixteenths, etc) far outweighs the "benefit" of this notation having references such as the middle 'c' dashed lines...


I prefer something closer to the 6-6 Klavar, and indicating duration is not a problem. Traditional notation doesn't offer the only way of showing note duration.

You can either use a combination of stems and flags, or used dashed lines for beats which is very practical for both reading and ease of writing it out. Look at the top of the page on the second link. That's closer to what i have in mind, though I always want C as a white note, as in the vertical 6-6 Klavar.

...Not that I actually use much of any kind of staff notation (I only need numbers).
#17
Quote by Dodeka
I prefer something closer to the 6-6 Klavar, and indicating duration is not a problem. Traditional notation doesn't offer the only way of showing note duration.

You can either use a combination of stems and flags, or used dashed lines for beats which is very practical for both reading and ease of writing it out. Look at the top of the page on the second link. That's closer to what i have in mind, though I always want C as a white note, as in the vertical 6-6 Klavar.

...Not that I actually use much of any kind of staff notation (I only need numbers).

Firstly, standard notation is just that, standard. If you spend save time by learning any type of staff other notation than standard then you will waste any time you've saved trying to find pieces written in that system.

Also, although you may think standard notation is complicated because of all the sharps and flats, the prescense (sp?) of sharps and flats suits diatonic playing very well. The use of key signatures gives the players an idea of the key straight away, and the use of key signatures helps players learn the Co5 which can only help them.

And what do you have against the layout of the piano. If try and learn intervals then you'll find that the layout of the piano is very convinient because you only have to count along four white notes to be sure of finding some kind of fourth.

The other type of keyboard you mentioned seems much more confusing than the normal type.
#18
Piano tabs= waste of time

I find the songs frustrating to learn using piano tabs. They're usually not right and you'd be better off finding the chords on here and learning by ear, or just buying the sheet music.

If you need a good start to learning a song by ear, you can get a sample of the first page of the sheet music at http://www.musicnotes.com.

If you still insist on using the piano tab, I'd use this http://ezinearticles.com/?An-Introduction-to-Piano-Tablature&id=574205

Hope this could be of some help.
-Souls United
#19
Quote by Dodeka
I prefer something closer to the 6-6 Klavar, and indicating duration is not a problem. Traditional notation doesn't offer the only way of showing note duration.

You can either use a combination of stems and flags, or used dashed lines for beats which is very practical for both reading and ease of writing it out. Look at the top of the page on the second link. That's closer to what i have in mind, though I always want C as a white note, as in the vertical 6-6 Klavar.

...Not that I actually use much of any kind of staff notation (I only need numbers).


uh.... from what I read, the duration of a note is indicated typically by the start of the next note... So how do you indicate when a chord is to be held out with the left hand while a melody on the right plays over top of it? This system just looks way out there and I think it overcomplicates things. Standard notation for guitar requires good knowledge of the fretboard, for the piano, it doesn't really as long as you understand black keys are sharps and flats. This system seems to actually make music HARDER to read, lol. Just my opinion, though, maybe it's easier to some others.
#20
Haha piano tabs...LOL. I never knew such a thing existed. Though I'm not suprised...Wierd! Start training your ear, it'll save you a lot of hassle, so you don't have to be one of those "What's the tab for Hey there Delilah?" people.

November Rain is easy enough on the piano, even if it takes you a long time, learn it by ear if you can, you'll be glad you did. As long as you know your chords, inversions and all that stuff, you'll be sweet.

I think the biggest mistake people make when they try and learn piano songs like this is they don't know their chords properly beforehand. That just makes it difficult when trying to follow a "tab" or sheet music, or whatever.

If you know your chords and understand the notes that build them up, then you're absolutely fine. If this is not the case, then learn that stuff, and then you will be closer to being able to pick these songs out by ear.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Jan 7, 2009,
#21
Quote by 12345abcd3
And what do you have against the layout of the piano. If try and learn intervals then you'll find that the layout of the piano is very convinient because you only have to count along four white notes to be sure of finding some kind of fourth.

The other type of keyboard you mentioned seems much more confusing than the normal type.


Firstly, a typical piano keyboard has octaves spaced about 6.25 inches; the Jankó keyboard has that down to about five. Also, there's nothing confusing about it; it's an incredibly simple, uniform keyboard. With a standard keyboard, you have to learn different fingerings for every key. With a Jankó-type keyboard, there aren't many different fingerings; you just move shapes about. You can 'count' keys much more easily to find your intervals on a Jankó - that's one of the points.


Quote by Monsterhog
uh.... from what I read, the duration of a note is indicated typically by the start of the next note... So how do you indicate when a chord is to be held out with the left hand while a melody on the right plays over top of it? This system just looks way out there and I think it overcomplicates things.


There are many different proposals on that site. To hold out something beyond something else, I circle the pitch numbers and use a line to indicate what they're extended beyond. It don't feel it overcomplicates things at all. Quite the opposite. Musicians as a whole are just too used to the peculiarities of the old system and are too conservative to consider proposals for improvement.
#22
So the shortcomings of piano tab (and the resultant crippling of a person's ability and motivation to become musically literate) are similar to those of guitar tabs.

No surprise.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.