#1
So, a few weeks ago I played bass at at small local venue. Once they got past the fact idea that basses could play chords, they said I was great. (Hooray!) However, One song I played was complete improv in A major set to a single riff. Sadly, as I don't have a loop, I must continue playing this riff at times. Dilemma Time! The repetitive riff could easily become boring at future gigs, however if I never go back to the riff (which I do change up while I play) the improv melody loses all emotion and drive, leaving a bassist soloing to a riff that is playing only in his head. Even more boring.

How do you, as bassists, deal with this?
#2
tapping helps. constantly playing not just a riff, but a pattern, really helps.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#3
Quote by blue_dragonzero
So, a few weeks ago I played bass at at small local venue. Once they got past the fact idea that basses could play chords, they said I was great. (Hooray!) However, One song I played was complete improv in A major set to a single riff. Sadly, as I don't have a loop, I must continue playing this riff at times. Dilemma Time! The repetitive riff could easily become boring at future gigs, however if I never go back to the riff (which I do change up while I play) the improv melody loses all emotion and drive, leaving a bassist soloing to a riff that is playing only in his head. Even more boring.

How do you, as bassists, deal with this?



I ask a guitarist and drummer to play with me
#4
It's more of a chord prog. than a riff though

--7h9--9p7----10------------10--9h7-7----12
--7-----7----778--------------8--7----7----12
---------------------88-865-------------------
-------------------------------------------------

Improv Tapping takes MASSIVE skill though, unless you mean arp. tapping the chords?


And by small I mean 20x12 ft room, I play with acoustic players there occaisionally, but drummers would deafen people in that cubicle of a room.
Last edited by blue_dragonzero at Jan 6, 2009,
#5
tap the basic progression of the riff with your left hand, then throw little melodic fills in over it.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#7
Quote by the humanity
tap the basic progression of the riff with your left hand, then throw little melodic fills in over it.


I'm not quite strong enough to do proficient repetitive patterns with my left hand yet. Any free time not playing bass though, and I pluck the strings lefty to increase strength. When I'm able to, I'll let you know how it goes.
#8
Quote by blue_dragonzero
I'm not quite strong enough to do proficient repetitive patterns with my left hand yet. Any free time not playing bass though, and I pluck the strings lefty to increase strength. When I'm able to, I'll let you know how it goes.

well, you can just do the chord changes, like G.........A..........E..............E

or something like that.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#9
Good drummers know how to dampen, play with brushes, and overall adjust volume to any size room: had a properly leveled performance in my living room a couple months ago.

If I wasn't into the ensemble thing, I'd personally just save and sell for a loop pedal. Maybe not the advice you're looking for, but if that's what you need, then that's what you need.
#10
For the drummer dilemma you might want to consider other kinds of percussion, I've jammed in small rooms with bongo/other instruments like those and it usually sounded great It's an interesting experience because you don't have to worry about playing loudly or arranging your playing around the drums so that you can be heard, which can often happen with a full drum set in a small venue.

And I second the tapping suggestion, though I understand that it can take several months to work up the finger strength, I don't tap extensively solely because it feels like I'm playing a whole new instrument and I move on to other things, but if you have it in you, it can really save you in the future in these types of situations.
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