#1
Since I couldn't find a website or any information on my books about how to properly measure your action, I would like your advice.
Where do you measure from, the nut or the 12th fret?
If so what are the average heights for all of the strings?
If you can provide a website, it would be great.
#3
i believe you fret it at the 1st and 12th and then measure the height at the 6th.
i could very well be wrong, but that's what i remember.
#4
Quote by Locked_Deadbolt
i believe you fret it at the 1st and 12th and then measure the height at the 6th.
i could very well be wrong, but that's what i remember.


well I've never heard of that...

I don't have a capo so I would have to have someone else's help
#5
You measure from the 12th fret from the bottom of the string to the top of the fret.

I usually start out at 3/32 of an inch on the low E string and 2/32 of an inch on the high E string.
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#7
Quote by thementor
You measure from the 12th fret from the bottom of the string to the top of the fret.

I usually start out at 3/32 of an inch on the low E string and 2/32 of an inch on the high E string.


That sounds logical, but does it ever fret buzz? Because that seems to be the largest problem with my guitar, fret buzz.
I also don't have the right ruler for measurement...
#9
ffs, you don't need a bloody ruler Just look at it and play it, if it buzzes raise it, if it doesn't then either lower it or leave it where it is, or even raise it some more...it's up to you.

The actual height is irrelevant, what matters is the effect that height has on the playability of the guitar and that's easily measured without ever knowing the actual height of the strings. Besides, there is no definitive action, it's different for all guitars and also all guitarists, some players like insanely low action, others hate that and would prefer to be able to drive a train under the strigs, most people are somewhere in the middle.
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#10
Here's the general rule of thumb measurements and measuring methods i've picked up.
For neck bow, fret it at the first and 15th fret, measure the gap at the seventh. you generally want 0.011" to 0.013" gap at seventh fret.
For action, check the string height without touching the guitar (except for your ruler, if possible) from the top of the 15th fret to the bottom of the string, here you want 3/32" to 1/16".
On cheaper guitars these measurements might not be optimal, use your ears to tell you if you need higher action.
Also, other factors weigh in here, down-tuning may make your strings flop around more, requiring more action. Worn frets, play style, etc.

Most of these measurements and techniques were taken from this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvuahP-ZO-c
and others like it.
#11
If you get alot of frett buzz on all strings normally either your strings are too low or the relief in the neck is incorrect or both.
#12
Pickup the book "How to make your electric guitar play great". It explains all aspects of how to measure, tweak and setup your guitar.
#13
A quick google "setting height electric guitar" gives this..

When buying a new electric guitar you’d probably think that it would be in top-notch playing condition as soon as you pull it out of the box. The fact that your new guitar is made of wood…..and wood moves! Temperature and humidity both effect wood and by the time your guitar gets to you it may need a minor adjustment or two. Additionally, as your guitar ages, you may have to perform periodic adjustments in order to keep your guitar in good playing condition. This is normal for all guitars.

The following tips concern general, basic set-up…however, if you are not sure of what is being described here or are not sure of your capability to carry out the instructions, do yourself a favor and take your axe to a qualified guitar technician.

ADJUSTING THE TRUSS ROD:

All electric guitars have an adjustable metal truss rod that runs down the center of the neck. (Figure 1)

The truss rod adjustment can be both simple and complex at the same time. On the simple side, a minor adjustment to straighten a neck with too much concave bow or to relieve a convex bow is possibly all that is needed to make a dramatic improvement to your guitars playability. On the complex side, adjusting the rod alters other aspects of the set-up such as overall action, string height and intonation.….and YOU CAN DAMAGE YOUR GUITAR PERMANENTLY IF THE ADJUSTMENT IS NOT MADE CORRECTLY. If you feel confident that you can make this adjustment…read on.


Place a capo at the first fret. (Figure 2)
Press the low E string down at the 17th fret. (Figure 2)
Look for a small gap of (approximately .010” or 0.25mm) between the top of the 7-9th fret and the underside of the string. (Figure 2)
If there is too much gap, the truss rod needs to be turned clockwise. (Figure 3)
If there is not enough gap, the truss rod needs to be turned counter clockwise. (Figure 3)

TIPS:


Never force the adjustment if it feels tight.
Make any adjustment in very small degrees at a time.
Let the neck “settle” between adjustments.
If you are not clear on these instructions, take your guitar to a qualified technician.

SETTING THE ACTION/STRING HEIGHT:
Once you are sure your truss rod has been adjusted properly, you will want to adjust the action or string height to insure the best playability. String height is measured at the 12th fret.


Using a steel ruler, measure the action on the top and bottom strings. (Figure 4)
Adjust the bottom string (low E) to 2.00mm and the top string (high E) to 1.5mm by raising or lowering the saddle. (Figure 5)
Set the middle strings by gradually increasing the height from treble to bass side. (Figure 5)

SETTING INTONATION:
Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret (Figure 6) and then play the fretted 12th fret note.
If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner. (Figure 7)
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner. (Figure 7)
Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same.

SETTING PICK-UP HEIGHT.
Pick-up height can greatly effect your guitars output. The closer to the strings the pick-up is, the more output you will get but….if the pick-up is too close the strings, problems can occur with magnetic pull.

Fret the outer strings (one at a time) at the top fret. (Figure 8)
Measure the distance from the top of the pick-up to the underside of the string. (Figure 8)
Adjust so there is between 2.5mm and 3.00mm. (Figure 9)

And there you have it! In theory the actions described above are simple but in reality they can be very tricky. We suggests that your first attempt at these operations be made in the presence of someone who has done them before to insure you don’t make an instrument altering mistake.
#14
Quote by steven seagull
ffs, you don't need a bloody ruler Just look at it and play it, if it buzzes raise it, if it doesn't then either lower it or leave it where it is, or even raise it some more...it's up to you.

The actual height is irrelevant, what matters is the effect that height has on the playability of the guitar and that's easily measured without ever knowing the actual height of the strings. Besides, there is no definitive action, it's different for all guitars and also all guitarists, some players like insanely low action, others hate that and would prefer to be able to drive a train under the strigs, most people are somewhere in the middle.


sensible words :-)
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