#1
Hello Everyone, I'm getting ready to record in a couple weeks for two of my bands (jazz trio and funk/chill rock, somewhat RHCP esque), and it's my first time to record on the Bass, though not my first time recording in general (I've recorded on drums for a chill rock band and on trombone for a ska band). Anyways, I was just wondering if any of you have any sort of habits on recording day, or just routines you get yourselves into. I somewhat enjoy recording, but I do know it can be quite stressful and very tedious.


One of my main things while recording is this: If at all possible, I must leave the room/recording area while someone else is recording their part. I don't know what it is, but it just stresses me out and makes me extremely tense to be in the same room. Also, assuming we aren't paying by the hour, my bandmates and I take regular breaks and play some video games or go outside in order to relax and loosen up some.


tl;dr. What are your habits and routines when you are recording? Especially when spending a lengthy period of time doing so.
#2
I usually wake up early, get a good morning fap in then take a shower. if the feeling is right Ill sneak another fap in while in the shower, the have a coffee. Ill warm my hands up with a good fap session prior to practice, then pack my gear and head to the studio. when I get to the studio, first thing I have to do - fap. then Ill get my gear arranged and tuned/set up and while the drummer is tuning, Ill head to the bathroom for a good fap session to relieve the stress.

when its my turn to record, Ill give er - then when Im done.....you guessed it, fap time


ok ok - in all seriousness - no I dont like to do the same routine, I try and just chill out, have a beer while getting set up then get my head on straight and get right to it.

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#4
The only time I've properly recorded was last July for my bands demo. We took the train to Chicago and got to the studio at around 9AM. I had been up the night before pretty late, so I was tired. It didn't take very long to record, but the mixing to forever. I took a nap for a lot of the day.
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#5
Quote by TooFast
The only time I've properly recorded was last July for my bands demo. We took the train to Chicago and got to the studio at around 9AM. I had been up the night before pretty late, so I was tired. It didn't take very long to record, but the mixing to forever. I took a nap for a lot of the day.


The mixing will always (especially for an unsigned/first album type band) take longer, because you will already have the songs written and well practised (Or should anyway)
#6
I eat/carry around kettle corn because my philosophy is:
Kettle corn is not just popcorn, its sweet popcorn;
My bass lines arent just bass lines, they are sweet bass lines.
IDK call me wierd =P
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#7
Time is money. You will either be charged per day or per hour 99% of the time. You don't have to be there all the time, but when you're recording, no breaks for you unless you're getting stressed. Someone should be setting up/soundchecking/recording all the time. The engineer/producer shouldn't need a break every half hour, it's his profession, agree on the number of breaks he will be allowed during the day, (1hr for lunch, 1hr for dinner and 15min breaks every two hours is a good amount). If he is late coming back from a break, dont pay for the time wasted, or add it on at the end.

Unless you're recording as a live band, you only need to be there for an hour, maybe two at a time to get your bass tracks down.

At all other times, switch off, when you're doing the takes, switch fully on, get in with the swing of the drums and stay focused. Nothing's more bitching than mistakes on a record.

If you want, go home when you're not needed, or just chill somewhere while the others are doing their stuff.

There will be a lot of time where you're doing jack all. Each instrument might take upto an hour to set up properly, drums will take 2 or 3 to do properly. This will involve mic placement, input levels, initial EQ. And all you will do through this is play a riff from the song over and over till you like the song, boring as. Even more boring if you're not the one being recorded.

To record 3 songs, might take you 16hrs if you do it on a push. Out of that, you'll be setting up/recording/rerecording your own instrument for maybe 2 hrs. Vocals will take the longest, especially with overdubs etc.

Take a magazine! Or a thick book!

Jokes are a good way to pass the time, my band's favourite which has been killed over and over is when someone is in the sound proof room recording, between takes, we'll flick the talkover button so they can hear us chatting the control room, then we'll pretend to turn it off after giving some instruction but actually not. Then we discuss how we're gonna chuck the recording member out. It keeps it light and stops you from going crazy, just make sure the member who is recording knows you're joking though!

Don't be scared to ask the engineer/producer any questions you might have. Any suggestions are really welcome too. If you don't think the snare sounds tight enough, say so. If you dont like the twang on the guitar, tell him.

Food is important. Hungry musicians = bad musicians and nothing tastes better than a pizza during recording time. When we were recording for a few days straight last year, there was a little supermarket down the road, we practically knew all the staff on first name terms because we visited it so much. Obviously make sure the engineer/producer is alright with you eating in the studio, if not, go to the lounge or summit if they have one. It'll keep you relaxed. I'd personally stay off the booze/drugs, you probably play worse after a couple tbh, but if you are getting really uptight and stressed, it might help a bit. You want the recording to sound flowing and natural, if you're stressed it'll sound like you recorded whilst wearing a straight jacket.

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#8
Quote by Jonnomainman
Time is money. You will either be charged per day or per hour 99% of the time. You don't have to be there all the time, but when you're recording, no breaks for you unless you're getting stressed. Someone should be setting up/soundchecking/recording all the time. The engineer/producer shouldn't need a break every half hour, it's his profession, agree on the number of breaks he will be allowed during the day, (1hr for lunch, 1hr for dinner and 15min breaks every two hours is a good amount). If he is late coming back from a break, dont pay for the time wasted, or add it on at the end.

Unless you're recording as a live band, you only need to be there for an hour, maybe two at a time to get your bass tracks down.

At all other times, switch off, when you're doing the takes, switch fully on, get in with the swing of the drums and stay focused. Nothing's more bitching than mistakes on a record.

If you want, go home when you're not needed, or just chill somewhere while the others are doing their stuff.

There will be a lot of time where you're doing jack all. Each instrument might take upto an hour to set up properly, drums will take 2 or 3 to do properly. This will involve mic placement, input levels, initial EQ. And all you will do through this is play a riff from the song over and over till you like the song, boring as. Even more boring if you're not the one being recorded.

To record 3 songs, might take you 16hrs if you do it on a push. Out of that, you'll be setting up/recording/rerecording your own instrument for maybe 2 hrs. Vocals will take the longest, especially with overdubs etc.

Take a magazine! Or a thick book!

Jokes are a good way to pass the time, my band's favourite which has been killed over and over is when someone is in the sound proof room recording, between takes, we'll flick the talkover button so they can hear us chatting the control room, then we'll pretend to turn it off after giving some instruction but actually not. Then we discuss how we're gonna chuck the recording member out. It keeps it light and stops you from going crazy, just make sure the member who is recording knows you're joking though!

Don't be scared to ask the engineer/producer any questions you might have. Any suggestions are really welcome too. If you don't think the snare sounds tight enough, say so. If you dont like the twang on the guitar, tell him.

Food is important. Hungry musicians = bad musicians and nothing tastes better than a pizza during recording time. When we were recording for a few days straight last year, there was a little supermarket down the road, we practically knew all the staff on first name terms because we visited it so much. Obviously make sure the engineer/producer is alright with you eating in the studio, if not, go to the lounge or summit if they have one. It'll keep you relaxed. I'd personally stay off the booze/drugs, you probably play worse after a couple tbh, but if you are getting really uptight and stressed, it might help a bit. You want the recording to sound flowing and natural, if you're stressed it'll sound like you recorded whilst wearing a straight jacket.



Some good advice there especially about the joking, I've been in sessions with some people I really like and have just hated it because everybody was always so serious and arguments would start but I've been on some sessions with people I've hardly known but because one of them's a bit of a joker it turns into total fun.

I do think youre being a bit serious with the whole not having breaks thing. A quick smoke (if you do smoke) break outside every now and then will seriously make things go better. And if you dont smoke but someone else does go with them, in fact everybody go out, have a bit of a chat disscuss how it's going. Somehow once youre outside of the studio itself ideas will form and people will be a bit more open about how they feel.

But all in all yeah listen to this guy, some good tips there
#9
I have no idea. Be patient with people. It is much easier to have someone who knows how to work stuff working stuff as it were. I record my own stuff at home... badly. Trust the engineer, but remember, you're paying them to engineer, not to produce. (unless you actually are paying them to produce too...)

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#10
Relaxation is the key for me. Recording AND playing live.
I just like to be around people, I hate solitude before recording sessions/shows.
Call Me Joe
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#11
Whooa ive got two weeks work experience in Feb, ill probably end up making loads of cups of tea but still.
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#12
Chill. Hum any basslines or ideas you have. Keep your fingers loose, the last thing you wanna do is tense up before you play.
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