#1
Dunno where to put this, mods can move it if they wish.

What are some good songs to practise vocals for? I have a pretty low voice, keep that in mind.
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#4
doesn't have to be songs that are already sung low, can also be songs you think would sound good if someone sang a lower version of it. My band managed to pull off welcome to the jungle with a low voice and it sounded quite good.
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
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Boss ME-50
#6
Never Gonna Give You Up. Seriously, it has a low vocal range and it has some pretty fun parts in it.
#7
House of The Rising Sun - The Animals
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#8
You don't need specific songs. Sing all the time. Sing in the shower, sing along to the radio, go out and do karaoke. It's a lot like guitar, you get better the more you do it.
-Guitar Gear-
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#10
Gackt. The man has a freakish vocal range.
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#11
Chocolate Rain

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#12
i do sing in the shower :P but i wanna practise along with songs as well
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
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#13
Quote by bubblesgogo
Gackt. The man has a freakish vocal range.

Most of the things I have heard from him don't cover a huge range. And you expect ts to learn songs in other languages?

There is a singing thread in Musicans Talk, go ask there, you should get some better answers.

Edit: And for the sake of this post being somewhat helpful besides the above advice, maybe try some HIM songs, Ville Valo has quite a low voice.
Last edited by Regression at Jan 7, 2009,
#14
jim morrison is good, i have a similar vocal range.anything else guys? what about songs that you think would sound good if redone with lower vocals?
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
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#15
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#16
Quote by Regression
Most of the things I have heard from him don't cover a huge range. And you expect ts to learn songs in other languages?

There is a singing thread in Musicans Talk, go ask there, you should get some better answers.

Edit: And for the sake of this post being somewhat helpful besides the above advice, maybe try some HIM songs, Ville Valo has quite a low voice.

this
#17
didn't know about the singing thread, sorry.
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
Fender FM 212
Boss ME-50
#18
Quote by Wiland
jim morrison is good, i have a similar vocal range.anything else guys? what about songs that you think would sound good if redone with lower vocals?

What sort of music do you like? You might want to try improve your upper range because to be honest, there isn't much of a place for low voices in modern music.

And see my above post.

Edit: ^ Tis okay, next time use the search bar though.
Last edited by Regression at Jan 7, 2009,
#19
Quote by Wiland
i do sing in the shower :P but i wanna practise along with songs as well



That's where singing along to the radio/CDs comes in. You sing in the shower because bathroom acoustics are notoriously good, and it gives you a chance to see how your voice sounds with reverb. Sing along to the radio/CDs when you want to try to match a range, but don't just mindlessly sing along with what's already been done. Try it in a lower range, higher range, different vocal vibratos, etc. Be creative. When you noodle on guitar to a song, do you just mindlessly play the song or do you have fun with it and try to jazz it up? Be creative, otherwise what's the point of being anything but a cover musician?
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#21
Well, this is kind of a dumb question. What style of vocals are you doing? Are you a Tenor or a Bass? (assuming you're male, I'm too lazy to look)

If you're a bass, I'd go with some Johnny Cash, (Basses are hard to find)
If You're a tenor, Ben Folds is pretty sweet.
#22
Quote by Wiland
i do sing in the shower :P but i wanna practise along with songs as well

Just going to add this in. I don't recommend singing along with songs, unless you cut the vocals out or something. From memory it often leads you into thinking you're in tune, I'm not sure what it is, but that's why so many people will sing along with songs but sound terrible, because to themselves they think they are in tune, when in reality, they are not.

Record yourself if you do decide to sing along with the vocals aswell, because atleast then you can hear yourself properly and analyse it afterwards.
#24
Coldplay is good to practice with if you have a low voice. A lot of people don't realize Chris Martin has quite a low voice...meaning he very rarely hits anything above bass range in full voice. He just has really good falsetto control. If you want to get good at this kind of thing, it's good to practice with. Don't restrict yourself to typical "low" like Johnny Cash, it's good to work on your low end, but explore out a bit otherwise you won't be pushing yourself enough. Look into other genres as well.

Alex Kapranos from Franz Ferdinand has a fairly low voice if that's your sort of thing...Cool songs.

But yeah the more you sing, the better you get. Ideally you don't want to restrict yourself to certain artists, just sing everything. If a songs to high, transpose it accordingly so the highest note in the song is your highest, giving you good practice.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Jan 7, 2009,
#25
Quote by Regression
Just going to add this in. I don't recommend singing along with songs, unless you cut the vocals out or something. From memory it often leads you into thinking you're in tune, I'm not sure what it is, but that's why so many people will sing along with songs but sound terrible, because to themselves they think they are in tune, when in reality, they are not.

Record yourself if you do decide to sing along with the vocals aswell, because atleast then you can hear yourself properly and analyse it afterwards.

I agree and disagree.

I agree because yeah, you can think you're in tune when you're way out. Also, recording yourself regardless of what type of musicianship you're practicing is an excellent way to gauge yourself.

However, singing along with songs is great vocal practice. Even if you don't hit the actual note, forcing your vocal muscles into places that are otherwise uncomfortable makes them work harder, and generally speaking people are more inclined to sing with more force to a song they know. I woulden't recommend it as the only practice, but as part of a practice routine it works great.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#26
Quote by Garou1911
I agree and disagree.

I agree because yeah, you can think you're in tune when you're way out. Also, recording yourself regardless of what type of musicianship you're practicing is an excellent way to gauge yourself.

However, singing along with songs is great vocal practice. Even if you don't hit the actual note, forcing your vocal muscles into places that are otherwise uncomfortable makes them work harder, and generally speaking people are more inclined to sing with more force to a song they know. I wouldn't recommend it as the only practice, but as part of a practice routine it works great.



Never thought of it that way, atleast my post wasn't completely wrong.
#27
does any one know any exercises i could do to improve my falsetto control?
Gear:
Epiphone Sg-400 standard
Epiphone DR 100 VS
Fender FM 212
Boss ME-50
#29
Quote by Wiland
What are some good songs to practise vocals for?
What exactly do you want to practice?

Sustain: Try some songs with long notes. The kind Celine Dion and Whitney Houson sing. Doesn't matter if it doesn't fit your style. It's just practice, right?

Tonalty: Try songs with inhabitual intervals. A favorite of mine is Yesterday from Paul McCartney.

For timbre (or whatever you guys call it) I like Jimi Hendrix' Little Wing. But I base it on Skid Row's or Sting's versions. Mind you, it sounds simple but it's not.

I have a pretty low voice, keep that in mind.
You can transpose any song within your range. If you want to practice with your band, you might have to rewrite some of their parts too, but since you pulled off that Sweet Child o' Mine, I guess you know how to do it.

Someone suggested to practice in the shower. This is great advice since the echo will help you hear if you sing in tune.