#1
I would like to get a custom built guitar... Im trying to figure out what kind of woods would go well together for a guitar. Including: The body, Laminate top(if i decided to get one), the neck, fretboard, etc...

I am looking to build a guitar that can be used for several different styles of music. But it is all rock or metal based. The Diversity in the sound of the guitar is very important for me.

If anyone can help I would really appreciate it.

-CHris
#3
what is it based off of ? (guitar model)

EDIT: Building and customizing forum dude!take it there
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
Last edited by nowa90 at Jan 8, 2009,
#5
mahogany body with a maple laminate is the most common one used. The maple is said to brighten up the sound of the mahogany. Your diversity is also largely based on pickups and amp as well so you might want to adress those things as well
Quote by Dr. House
Nice vibe you just put out there. Its like daddy just hit mommy at the dinner table and we all still want to eat.
#7
^I'm glad some one else said this. I was coming back to edit my post. Anyway ohspyro is right if your going to do a see through finish then some sort of figuring in the wood does look nice (such as maple or if you have some money figure mahogany) but if you are going with a solid color finish you are just as well going with bass wood or as in Melvin Hiscocks book poplar.
Quote by Dr. House
Nice vibe you just put out there. Its like daddy just hit mommy at the dinner table and we all still want to eat.
#8
I disagree to be honest...
It's not 100% of the tone, but it does affect it.
It's probably not even 50%, but more like 20-25%.

I agree with building a guitar with the best looking wood, but you can't just use anything.
I'm not going to argue, but there was a thread on Project Guitar with both sides of the argument and the people contributing were people with experience.
I don't remember where I was,
When I realized life was a game.
The more seriously I took things,
The harder the rules became.
#9
Quote by WH15P3R
I disagree to be honest...
It's not 100% of the tone, but it does affect it.
It's probably not even 50%, but more like 20-25%.

I agree with building a guitar with the best looking wood, but you can't just use anything.
I'm not going to argue, but there was a thread on Project Guitar with both sides of the argument and the people contributing were people with experience.



As long as the wood is structurally suited for guitar building, it doesn't matter.

There is a study, by the University of Toledo, that proves that the difference between woods is not noticeable through frequency analysis, let alone a human ear.

Wood doesn't make a 20% difference. I am betting the difference is more like.... 2% if that.
#10
I think wood has an effect, just not as dramatic as some people believe. That Toledo study is bad though. They compared ash and alder, which are almost identical woods in terms of structure, and grain. The only difference is weight


http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/options/options_bodywoods.cfm should give you a good idea of wood's effect on tone
R.I.P. Les Paul, 1915-2009

A man chooses, a slave obeys.
Last edited by bv310 at Jan 8, 2009,
#11
Quote by ohspyro89
As long as the wood is structurally suited for guitar building, it doesn't matter.

There is a study, by the University of Toledo, that proves that the difference between woods is not noticeable through frequency analysis, let alone a human ear.

Wood doesn't make a 20% difference. I am betting the difference is more like.... 2% if that.


True True.

As for the tests being bad because of the two woods being similar and that is why, I don't buy it. Get some one to do a blind test on several guitars that have the the same bridge and style pickups, as long as you switch out the pick ups, youll never figure out the difference. Also with this you cant just test A then B because you need a more extensive body to draw conclusions, because you'll have a 50% chance of guesseing correctly.

Body wood is almost irrelevant, Necks are more important, mostly for playability though.
#12
I still think its bologna.

Why would wood effect magnetic induction?

And you can argue that the wood causes the string to vibrate "differently" and resonate different, but that doesn't make too much sense to me. Other than sustain I have a HARD time believing that wood can cause a change in tone.

And if I ever use a different wood than mahogany for a build, you bet I'll switch out hardware and stuffs.
#13
Quote by ohspyro89
I still think its bologna.

Why would wood effect magnetic induction?

And you can argue that the wood causes the string to vibrate "differently" and resonate different, but that doesn't make too much sense to me. Other than sustain I have a HARD time believing that wood can cause a change in tone.

And if I ever use a different wood than mahogany for a build, you bet I'll switch out hardware and stuffs.

Well, I'll try dig up the thread they had and post it here.
If wood doesn't make any difference, why use Mahogany to build them rather than using a veneer if you're after the look?
Bit weird your logic
I don't remember where I was,
When I realized life was a game.
The more seriously I took things,
The harder the rules became.
#14
If this turns into another "wood matters vs. no it doesn't" thread I'm reporting everyone.

Leave it alone, and stop hijacking this thread. If you must have a discussion, do it via the PM system.

Can wood species affect the tone? We'll never know, because no two pieces of wood in the whole world will ever be the same as one another.

Until someone on this site themselves proves it one way or another, fuggov. Thanks.

I would like to get a custom built guitar... Im trying to figure out what kind of woods would go well together for a guitar. Including: The body, Laminate top(if i decided to get one), the neck, fretboard, etc...

I am looking to build a guitar that can be used for several different styles of music. But it is all rock or metal based. The Diversity in the sound of the guitar is very important for me.

If anyone can help I would really appreciate it.

-Chris


Go look at guitars that are already in existance, and figure out what you do and don't like about them. I find that going to www.warmoth.com to look over their bodies and necks often helps me find combos that I like.

For example, I have a lot of favourite guitar wood combos. One is sapele with stripes of bloodwood laminated in. Another is swamp ash with a sunburt on it, and yet another is a quilted maple cap that burst from blue to clear. My favourite necks are usually five peice laminates of maple and thing stripes of ebony, bloodwood, koa, or walnut.

It is all personal preference, and that is something we can't help you with.
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.