#1
Hi .....

Im seriously considering this but am not sure where to start.
The thing is I'm just out of university after finishing a degree
in computer science and I'm really not in the mind set to go back to do
another course.

So I guess what I really wanna know is what the industry looks for in a
recording engineer. Does a degree or certification really matter a lot ?
If so what sort of degree/qualification will I have to get ?.

Or would be better to just get the required work experience by doing
a few internships ?

Any advise on the topic is welcome ...
#2
i have worked with a few and experience is teh greatest qualification you can get.

Plus its usually only the colleges not universities that teach it so it can be rather expensive.

I was looking at an SAE course in Aus for two years and it was gonna cost Aud$30000
#3
Well a lot of the time, the studios are run by one or two guys, even some of the fairly big ones. They'll have assistants but yeah, basically it means you can start yourself, start small, and build up.

First things first though, how much experience do you have?

If you have no experience at all, then you're going to want to do a course, or start putting in the hours yourself. You can learn yourself but obviously it takes a lot of time of experimenting and whatever.

Then you can either keep doing what you're doing, refining yourself, doing demos for friends, recording yourself, slowly start charging, etc.

You can also try for an internship, just contact all the studios in your city and offer your services. All the studios I've recorded in recently have had guys like this, just starting out looking to get experience. And they get paid.

From here you can work towards starting your own studio. It's not something you do overnight. You gain the experience and slowly, over a period of time build up the gear. Start a home studio. A computers a start. Get yourself comfortable recording with a simple interface at home. Then maybe you can upgrade to a larger desk, more software, more mics, etc. Build from there.

Bottom line is, you don't need a course. You just need to know your ****, which can be done working hard at home.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Jan 9, 2009,
#4
Quote by futsalman
i have worked with a few and experience is teh greatest qualification you can get.

Plus its usually only the colleges not universities that teach it so it can be rather expensive.

I was looking at an SAE course in Aus for two years and it was gonna cost Aud$30000


$30k? I went for an interview with them, along with tours of the Sydney and Byron "campuses" and was told it would be around $15k all up.
In the end, it comes down to where you're located. People giving you advice for courses and whatnot in Australia is a bit stupid if you're located in the UK.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."
#5
Ears?
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#6
hi guys ...thanks a lot for the advise so far ....well its not that im not open to courses at all ...
the main thing is that i dont wanna invest a lot into one ...so if its a course for an amount that i can afford like say around 2 to 3 grant (GBP) , i may consider it ....

Couple of things

1) So far I have no experience other than a small knowledge in how stuff works ...like how
mixers work ...the different kind of inputs (but thats hardly anything ...its really basic stuff)

2) Now that I think about it ..working from home and learning on my own is not a viable option cuz I work full time as a software developer and I just won't have the time to do it once im done with work everyday ...

Will doing a course increase changes of employ ability ?...
If so Id rather prefer that rather than experiment in my free time hoping im
on the right path ....

Also are studio engineer posts permanent ? i mean how does it work if someone
hires you to work as an engineer in their studio ? are you usually employed on the basis
of a small term contracts ? or is it a permanent post .
#7
1) So far I have no experience other than a small knowledge in how stuff works ...like how
mixers work ...the different kind of inputs (but thats hardly anything ...its really basic stuff)


This is the first issue you need to address. You need SOME knowledge before you will be accepted as an intern or whatever.

So you work during the day, record at night. You'll need the experience.

It's not about a course. But if you have no experience recording then a course will be able to help you faster. Doing it the home way is great if you have time but since you're working you may want to consider the course, or dedicate your nights to recording.

Will doing a course increase changes of employ ability ?...
If so Id rather prefer that rather than experiment in my free time hoping im
on the right path ....


Not really. The course will give you some skills, sure. But if you're a beginner, even a 1 year course is not going to really make you a master, you're still going to have to sit down and practice every night, or whenever you can.

So course or not, you need to put in hours. Serious hours. If you're serious about becoming a recording engineer you need to, it's not just a do a course and become one kind of thing. Does a musician do a 1 year course and become slash? No. They learn the basics, a few things here and there and then it's bye bye, go and practice.

Same sort of thing here.

Also are studio engineer posts permanent ? i mean how does it work if someone
hires you to work as an engineer in their studio ? are you usually employed on the basis
of a small term contracts ? or is it a permanent post .


Basically it's like, you contact all the studios, tell them you have experience in recording at home, or just finished a course, or whatever, and want to help. A lot of people get jobs this way. Most likely pretty part time, and whatever. But yeah, it's a start.

The problem is, in most cases, studios are busy and they don't want someone lying around who doesn't know what they're doing. You don't have to be a Jedi master but you need to know your stuff.

There's really no way for us to answer if it's permanent or not, that would depend on the studio. But yeah, if they take you as an intern, helper, whatever, you will probably stay as long as you want.

But studios usually have the main guy running the place who does all the serious work. People go to different studios because the engineer is cool at that particular place, has a certain sound, or works in a certain way.

If you want to be that main engineer guy who runs the place, you have to work for a long time, either as an intern, or building your own studio. That's how most guys who run studios I know have done it.

It's literally just work. Hundreds and hundreds of hours. As well as the technical side, there's an art to it that you really have to dedicate yourself to. There are loads of people flapping around their 1 year audio course bits of paper. Same as there are millions of actors, guitarists, but how many of them are really good? much less. And I don't mean just technically good. I mean stylish, clever, fresh, new, interesting.

Bottom line - get yourself a cheap mixer, get yourself a program and get to work. Record all your friends bands for free, in your spare time. Use sequenced drums until you can afford to do a full kit. Do a course if you want. Learn to EQ. Learn your effects. Learn to mix. Spend more hours at home. Hundreds more hours. Get good. Learn about gear. Spend time at audio conventions. Talk to people who do it for a job. Go to the studios. Talk to the engineers. Make friends with them.

You can do this as quickly as you want. Just be good at what you do, and you're done.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Jan 9, 2009,
#8
Thanks a lot chrisbg .....wow ...thats a lot more of stuff than i tht ...
I mean ...i think my perception of what a studio engineer does was wrong to a huge extend ...

I mean ...it looks like an eng does a lot of producing as well....
what i had tht was that ....all an engineer has to do is get the sound that the
producer wants and that the artist is looking for ....
#9
Ah, well, that's true as well, of course if it's a really big band you're doing, they'll have a producer. Some moderately big independent bands will have their own producer. It depends really on who your working with. Even some of the bigger studios work with really small starting out bands, in which case they won't have producers, and most of the time, they will just have their songs, and you'll record them, giving input when required. But they usually don't have the money to sit there and really work on the tracks adding new things, it's more a case of making them sound good for their money.

The best thing to do is master the technical side, because you'll soon see what your producing is like. If you have a good ear for music, know your stuff on songwriting, etc. then it would be a good idea to produce as well.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Jan 9, 2009,
#10
See if you can just get some experience working in a studio before you consider doing anything. I ended up getting a job helping out a local band while they were recording (decked out one of their outdoor rooms with about $20k in recording gear), and it totally wasn't what I expected it to be.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."