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#1
The company I'm working for gave everyone 2 weeks notice a few days ago. Not
surprising since we had both our publishers cancel our development contracts
leaving no money coming in. I've been programming for about 30 years and of
that about 15 doing computer/PS2/PS3/Wii games. While that might be about as fun
as any job could be, if I don't look at another line of C++, or game ever again, I
wouldn't miss it.

So, I'm going to try a shot at teaching guitar. I'm getting content for a web site
prepared and I'll have it up & running in a few weeks. Basically, this will be all free,
mostly guitar tips/lessons/pointers and my playing on display to establish my
cred.

Mostly this is just to give me something to do that's in service to others, as opposed
to making money. I'll have unemployment coming in (which isn't a lot) and just
need a small supplemental stream of revenue. Not even that really, but in this
economy who knows?

Mostly what I'll need initially is: students. What I'm looking for, is good ways to
attract and promote. Things on a more local level. I've thought of a bunch already
(like putting up flyers at schools, libraries, local shops....), but anything anyone
can think of, let me hear them!
#2
Well I teach guitar also.

What I do is I go to local concerts, and if I see enthusiastic guitar players, talk to them and ask if they have a teacher etc.

I also go to local jam sessions and jam with people, and I tell there I teach too, and if they want lessons etc.

It started out with people just asking if I could teach them some, and then it was still like they'd buy me free beers or something, now I do it for money, cause it's fun and I learn new stuff as well occasionaly.

If I was rich I'd probably teach for free, but ye bills and amsterdam is expensive.

I also have quite some musician's friends where we refer people to each other(I refer drummers to drum friend and they refer guitarists to me and I refer pianist/keyboardist to pianistfriends, etc.)

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 9, 2009,
#3
MYSPACE.... i cannot influince that enough, and youtube, everyone loves youtube, and here of course....and if u live in the us, i might come try it out in the summer when i go to california
#4
While I wish you the best, I'm afraid I can't really help with your specific problem. In my circumstances (ie, small savings, high cost of living) I had to get as many students as possible ASAP in order to break even, and the only logical way of doing so was to work for somebody. That'd certainyl be worth looking into actually, see if you can do beginner lessons somewhere, an evening in a small music school can be worth a lot in terms of money and experience.

Have you ever taught before?
#5
Try going to some primary schools and ask if you can have a short assembly? That's what somebody did in my school, and it got me into wanting to play the guitar.
#6
I've never taught before, but I have some very clear initial thoughts about how it
should be done with some adjustments for who I'm teaching. I'll refine it as I go.
While I certainly don't know everything about music, I took piano lessons at a
conservatory for 10 years before I even touched a guitar and I've played guitar
about 30. So, chances are, I'd be out front of most potential students in most areas.
My focus will be on improvisation which I know best.

The money isn't an issue at all really. I could go a long time without working, if ever
again. Mostly something to get me out and about and have me look busy enough
so my wife doesn't bug me about going back to a "real" job.
#7
Quote by michal23
Try going to some primary schools and ask if you can have a short assembly? That's what somebody did in my school, and it got me into wanting to play the guitar.



Whilst in theory that seems ok, I teach in schools and colleges and just to be let in you need a CRB certificate and public liability insurance in the uk.

I am just getting this years CRB done and that is £40 or so, the public liability comes through MU membership. Also there is membership of the RGT to give security to potential students.

After all that I can then see about getting into schools, most of which are closed shops as various agencies run the music system.

So... good luck.
#8
Quote by RichieJovie
Whilst in theory that seems ok, I teach in schools and colleges and just to be let in you need a CRB certificate and public liability insurance in the uk.

I am just getting this years CRB done and that is £40 or so, the public liability comes through MU membership. Also there is membership of the RGT to give security to potential students.

After all that I can then see about getting into schools, most of which are closed shops as various agencies run the music system.

So... good luck.


Which is why I teach "illegal".

Easier for me and cheaper for the students.

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#9
Quote by RichieJovie

I am just getting this years CRB done and that is £40 or so, the public liability comes through MU membership. Also there is membership of the RGT to give security to potential students.


I can see how these "certificates" and dues can give the potential student some
measure of reassurance that a "standard" is being met. But, if you can play, it's
clear. If you can teach, that's clear pretty quick too. I'm not going to get into
any of this certificate, license or training business. As far as I'm concerned, those
are all methods for others to skim off the work/talent of others without actually doing
anything themselves.

All I'm looking for at first is to get to an initial critical mass. If I'm doing well, it will
tend to perpetuate itself virally by word of mouth without a lot more of this sort of
effort. If it doesn't go well, I always have alternatives. I have absolute 0 pressure
or time frame on this initially. Just a bit of setup and footwork at the beginning and
then see how it goes.
#10
^ (to R.Christie) the RGT website seems to have deals with organisations allowing for discounted CRBs and public liabilty insurance. I hope that helps you out, and if you knew already, are there any snags or is it as it says on the tin?

Edg, looking through the grade material can help organise things in your mind and you may even learn something. Give it a go.

Plus, having a recognised qualification is a Good Thing, imo.
#11
Quote by edg
I can see how these "certificates" and dues can give the potential student some
measure of reassurance that a "standard" is being met. But, if you can play, it's
clear. If you can teach, that's clear pretty quick too. I'm not going to get into
any of this certificate, license or training business. As far as I'm concerned, those
are all methods for others to skim off the work/talent of others without actually doing
anything themselves.

All I'm looking for at first is to get to an initial critical mass. If I'm doing well, it will
tend to perpetuate itself virally by word of mouth without a lot more of this sort of
effort. If it doesn't go well, I always have alternatives. I have absolute 0 pressure
or time frame on this initially. Just a bit of setup and footwork at the beginning and
then see how it goes.



Yer, what you can do and what I did is to let the student take the first (or the 2nd also) lesson with you for free, and talk about what music he likes/wants to learn and jam a bit. And to see his ability, and making sure you can teach what he wants to learn.

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#12
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Which is why I teach "illegal".

Easier for me and cheaper for the students.


Well done


Good luck if someone gets injured in a lesson or makes an accusation against you.
#13
Quote by RichieJovie
Well done


Good luck if someone gets injured in a lesson or makes an accusation against you.


Why would someone get injured in a lesson?

And why would I be accused?

That **** maybe happen in America, in the Netherlands we aren't that retarded that we sue people for things as small as sneezing on you.

Ofcourse there's a chance, but there's also a chance I get stabbed, killed, blown away, or eaten by a goose.

If I'd live forever, I'd get as much degrees as I could, but I don't sadly I also need quite some cash for that, which I don't have.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 9, 2009,
#14
I'd just ask a music shop you are familiar with to recommend you to people who are asking about lessons,

As a matter of interest what company were you working for?













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#15
Whew... a few thoughts here....

My background will put this into perspective. I have an honours degree in classical guitar, and am a certified teacher in Ontario, teaching in the public school system for the past 12+ years. I taught guitar off and on (more on than off) from 1987-2007 privately in my home. (or my parents' home when I was a teenager)

Proper qualifications are necessary for a variety of things. Would you want some yahoo off the street teaching your ten year old? They're one way of screening out the wannabes and ensuring that the person teaching is someone who should be there. While no system is perfect, this one is a damned sight better than not requiring qualifications.

Word of mouth and your reputation, ultimately, will be your best advertising. Aside from that, and the other good suggestions, also check free internet sites and what not.

To do an assembly in a school, you need to give them a justification for doing so. If you can connect it to local curriculum expectations, you could be okay. Schools are always wary of blatant attempts at advertising a person's self-interests to their group of students. It has to be a meaningful event/activity. In Ontario, if the school invites you in as a guest presenter, you are covered under their liability insurance... another reason why they need to be judicious in who they ask to come in.

Here is an angle to consider, and as someone more mature, you'll stand a much better chance of being successful than if you were, say, 20....

In our board, we have some music instructors (generally they have a degree, though) who are not certified teachers. No, they are not replacing the work that certified teachers do. They come in and teach privately within the school to students, and this may be done during class time or at recess/lunch. I think the board gets a cut in return. The board endorses the teacher and supports permission forms, etc. The parents pay the fee to the teacher, usually on a per-term basis.

Often, the teacher gets some of his/her students at the school to play at an assembly to show off what they can do, and this generates interest in the program among students and parents. There is one program that has managed to anchor itself into at least a dozen schools around the board, and has students from grades 4-12. They have something like 300 students and they put on a show every year at Hamilton Place, a 2000+ soft-seat theatre-style venue. I can't help thinking they make a killing....

Another board in our area used to offer an 'artist in the classroom' series where a musician/artist/whatever would come in for a few lessons and support the classroom teacher by teaching the first few lessons of a unit using some activities that students would find engaging. It was win-win because the students bought into having a special guest with something special to offer, and the teacher (who almost invariably is not all that comfortable teaching music and doesn't know where to begin) gets some ideas that he/she might be able to run with and use later too. I did that for a few years before getting my teaching degree. There was no expectation that you have a music degree for this... just something engaging and real-world to offer the students.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jan 9, 2009,
#17
I suspect how music works in the US is a lot different than Canada and Europe.
As far as I know, there isn't this "grade"system I see talked about here every now and
then. Most of the people who teach privately don't have any particular qualification or
degree or certification. Either they're good or not. A lesson doesn't cost that much to
find out. In any case, my policy is going to be you can have your money back. No
reason required.

I'm only looking for good ideas to find students to teach privately. That's about it. I
don't really want to get involved with schools or institutions in any kind of official
capacity.

I'm pretty much going to have to rely on setting up a web site with plenty of content and vids of me playing to establish initial credibility. Beyond that, I just need to get people who are looking or thinking about it to check the site out.

There's the usual "free" net spots -- craigslist, here, etc...
Put up fliers in local shops.
Local music store.
Local churches?
Just tacking up fliers on telephone poles outside schools? (No doubt there's probably
a law against that and I'll get arrested ).

I think best bet is local schools (elementary, Jr, High), but I'm not sure the best way
to get ingress. I just want to leave enough info so kids/parents can check out the web
site. There must be a better way than phone poles.
#18
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Why would someone get injured in a lesson?

And why would I be accused?

That **** maybe happen in America, in the Netherlands we aren't that retarded that we sue people for things as small as sneezing on you.

Ofcourse there's a chance, but there's also a chance I get stabbed, killed, blown away, or eaten by a goose.

If I'd live forever, I'd get as much degrees as I could, but I don't sadly I also need quite some cash for that, which I don't have.


I'm not American... call me that again and I'll get annoyed.


How would someone get injured? Dodgy electrics, trip over, allergic reaction.

Risk assessment is the bane of my life but if you take your work seriously and I do, you do it.
#19
Quote by RichieJovie
I'm not American... call me that again and I'll get annoyed.


How would someone get injured? Dodgy electrics, trip over, allergic reaction.

Risk assessment is the bane of my life but if you take your work seriously and I do, you do it.


Sorry I didn't know you were not American; my apologies.


If they get injured, they say they tripped over a wire while playing guitar.

A doctor must be pretty paranoid (or psychic) to think;

Hmm you tripped while playing guitar... Hmmm I bet you were having "illegal" guitar lessons weren't you!!

That's a serious crime!!

Anyone teaching guitar without having it registered should go to jail!!

Technically it's against the law, but If I don't make a million dollar franchise out of it, noone is gonna complain.

Why do you think our country can have/has legal prostitution and marijuana?

We aren't as closeminded/asshole as most of the world in those kind of things.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 10, 2009,
#20
My dad has been teaching music for over 30 years, and no one ever got injured at his lessons or lectures.

He ran a summer camp for two years and the worst thing that happened was a girl broke a window with her hand.

It was pretty funny.
#21
Hahaha, the stuff you guys say. Though Richie is correct in saying "what if they accuse you of something". That is the biggest one to be afraid of. No matter who you are, how your personality is or if you're even capable of doing something, that risk is always there. And no one cares whether you're a good person, "out of the mouths of babes". I think its absolutely crap what kids get away with, but its real nonetheless. If you don't want hassles, don't take kids or female teens with a thirst for attention. Even though that is where your best money and experience lies, rather stay away from it. But then again...

Edg, teach. you do get promising students and those are the ones you pray for. The rest are slot fillets (yes, fillets) whose parents don't care if their kids learn anything, cos at the end of the day their parents' psychologist recommended music therapy.

Luckily you not in South Africa so you may not have the above steaming dump
#22
Quote by evolucian
Hahaha, the stuff you guys say. Though Richie is correct in saying "what if they accuse you of something". That is the biggest one to be afraid of. No matter who you are, how your personality is or if you're even capable of doing something, that risk is always there. And no one cares whether you're a good person, "out of the mouths of babes". I think its absolutely crap what kids get away with, but its real nonetheless. If you don't want hassles, don't take kids or female teens with a thirst for attention. Even though that is where your best money and experience lies, rather stay away from it. But then again...


Exactly. There's always a risk. Why shouldn't I teach.

With the right fantasy/story, I can accuse my neighbour for breathing in my air space when he had the flu, so I got the flu now and I have to pay for medicines.

Or some **** like that. This is completely pointless discussion.

I'm glad I used to get "illegal" guitar lessons. It was cheaper and it was private and it was totally aimed at my goals and not "overall" goals as in music schools.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 10, 2009,
#23
Its perfectly legal here to teach without certificates. The problem in my country is that the qualifieds have this air about themselves but they completely suck at teaching. Its a real trial and error run to find a decent teacher here, a very costly one at that. A lesson is equivalent to a deposit on a loaf of bread here, but at least one lesson here pays off a home loan in Zimbabwe.

I agree with the "overall" statement though. Who wants sheep. It relates to Ronnie James Dio in the 80's... He advertised for a guitarist but stated that "GIT grad's needn't bother". Interesting, wonder why

The Rock School grades are relatively easy to get, especially 8... crummy system, cheap but valid qualification nonetheless. (cheaper than university< like 1% of the cost>

Guess we'll never know in the end. Good luck edg
Last edited by evolucian at Jan 10, 2009,
#24
Quote by xxdarrenxx
We aren't as closeminded/asshole as most of the world in those kind of things.

No offense to Americans but, with regard to baseball, it really isn't acceptable to call it the "World Series" when it's not even played outside of your own fricken' borders!
#25
Everyone except Canadians has their follies... yes, even the Americans. I don't think that part of the discussion is relevant to this thread.

I'm not sure about this whole 'illegal' thing. Here is how it goes in Canada:

-any schmuck can legally run a business out of their home in Canada. (depending on the business, of course, but let's not get silly about it....)
-any schmuck can call him/herself a 'guitar teacher' or whatever, because he/she teaches guitar. "I teach, therefore I am a teacher." Ultimately, it is up to the consumer to decide if that person is a 'good' guitar teacher - regardless of qualifications.
-only a provincially certified teacher can teach in the publicly-funded school system.

Nothing illegal so far...

-if your mail-carrier or paper deliverer or next-door neighbour's kids come over and hurt themselves, you are still legally liable. Whether you're teaching guitar doesn't make a difference.
-if you coach T-ball or having your nephew over or are driving your kid's friend to school, you still face the risk of allegations of impropriety, and all the liabilities that come with it. That has nothing to do with teaching guitar, or running any other kind of business out of your home.

Still nothing illegal...

Now, here are some 'legal' considerations....

-You need to claim that income for tax purposes. (especially when it is your only visible source of income... haha....)
-Get your insurance in order. You will probably have to tell your insurance company that you are running a home business in order for you to be covered under any circumstance that may arise as a result of this home business. Yes, they will adjust your rates accordingly. Grrr....
-You *might* need to register your business. You might not. That will change from taxation area to taxation area. It also, I believe, depends on the amount of money involved. I always declared my private teaching income on my personal tax forms, and wrote stuff off against it - as a business - without any problems.
-A person who is thinking long-term will look into paying into other things like pension plan, health benefits, unemployment insurance, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#26
Ye^^

What I mean with I teach guitar "illegal" is I don't pay tax over the money I get.

Technically speaking you have to pay tax over any income of a service you provide.

If your dad gives you 10 euro's to wash his car, and you don't say this to the tax, technically you can be sued.

That's why it's lame discussion. It's not like I make 20k a year with my guitar teaching, no one is going to knock on my door for "illegal" teaching.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 10, 2009,
#27
So it's not the teaching that is illegal. It is the money management that is illegal.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#28
Quote by axemanchris
So it's not the teaching that is illegal. It is the money management that is illegal.

CT



Exactly.

Disclaimer:

I teach people guitar, and they are so kind that they give me gifts in the form of money every month or so.

Kids these days are so nice


The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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#30
Quote by evolucian
hmmm... what the hell is tax?


The money you pay to the government.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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#32
If you are a teenager making a little bit of money on the side, *chances are* you won't get caught. If you are an adult and it is your only source of income, you can almost bet your @ss you'll get caught when they eventually do an audit.

Ultimately, tax evasion is considered a serious offense. Act accordingly.

But!! Don't despair. It is actually worth it to claim this income, even if it is only a little bit.

Watch this... this is what I used to do when I was in my late teens/early 20's....

I claimed my private teaching income, even though it was significantly less than the income I made from my 'official' part time jobs that provided me with government tax slips. Because I was claiming the income, I was eligible to write stuff off against that income as business expenses. Research (concert tickets), professional resources (CDs, music books), supplies (strings, picks, cables, etc.), transportation (because I travelled to people's houses, I claimed a portion of my gas and insurance), etc. I also claimed depreciation on my equipment (guitars, amps, even my car!). At the end of it all, I wound up operating at a loss. I then applied that loss to my other income, reducing my amount of tax payable on that income.

There are a few things to be careful of with all that, and it is worth paying for an hour or two with a tax professional (which you can also write off) to get proper advice, but you should find that tax evasion is really not a very appealing option.

CT


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#33
Quote by Freepower
^ (to R.Christie) the RGT website seems to have deals with organisations allowing for discounted CRBs and public liabilty insurance. I hope that helps you out, and if you knew already, are there any snags or is it as it says on the tin?

.

Sorry man, but I don't follow your drift you could be confusing me with someone else who is more knowledgable on the organisations in your hemisphere. .

I teach privately and within our educational system without needing any special insurances.

To Edg, I'm tempted to take a bite over your statement: "I'm not going to get into
any of this certificate, license or training business. As far as I'm concerned, those
are all methods for others to skim off the work/talent of others without actually doing
anything themselves."

It is a provocative statement and I suspect, badly thought through.
#34
^ I am indeed confusing you for someone else, for some reason I thought you were teaching in the UK...

I would agree with you regarding that statement as well.

I claimed my private teaching income, even though it was significantly less than the income I made from my 'official' part time jobs that provided me with government tax slips. Because I was claiming the income, I was eligible to write stuff off against that income as business expenses. Research (concert tickets), professional resources (CDs, music books), supplies (strings, picks, cables, etc.), transportation (because I travelled to people's houses, I claimed a portion of my gas and insurance), etc. I also claimed depreciation on my equipment (guitars, amps, even my car!). At the end of it all, I wound up operating at a loss. I then applied that loss to my other income, reducing my amount of tax payable on that income.




I really must get my tax sorted out, actually... I haven't been meaning to evade it, I just haven't got round to it yet. Thanks for the tips.
#35
Quote by R.Christie


To Edg, I'm tempted to take a bite over your statement: "I'm not going to get into
any of this certificate, license or training business. As far as I'm concerned, those
are all methods for others to skim off the work/talent of others without actually doing
anything themselves."


LOL. If you like.

I have thought it out pretty well, and I'm not saying it doesn't make sense to
have accreditation in some areas. However, these days, you almost can't do
anything on your own without having to pay out to the government, license fees,
unions, organization... Someone is always taking a cut from the work you do.

If you really get to the bottom of all that, it's all based on fear. I could on on that,
but I won't.

Anyway... music and teaching privately: Would you disagree that it's pretty clear
if someone can play an instrument well or not? With the internet, there's plenty
of easy of ways to demonstrate this if someone is interested in finding out. With
a bit more work, and in a similar way, you can also demonstrate depth of musical
knowledge. Although, perhaps this isn't as clear cut. Lastly, can the person
teach?

The last question pretty much comes down to, you have to find out. This will either
come down to word of mouth or actually trying it out and even so, a given
teacher may not be right for all types of students. If you have pretty convincing
demonstrations of skill playing an instrument and knowledge, what more does a
"certificate" add? Is that any guarantee of a "better" teacher of music?

I'll just leave that question unanswered. It doesn't matter to me. Here in the US,
I don't need a certificate to teach privately, and that's all I plan on doing. Why
would I want to spend a lot of time and PAY to do that? I'll have sufficient skill
demonstration available for someone to decide. If they want to send little Johnnie
to a teacher with a "certificate", that's their choice.
#36
Quote by edg
LOL. If you like.

I have thought it out pretty well, and I'm not saying it doesn't make sense to
have accreditation in some areas. However, these days, you almost can't do
anything on your own without having to pay out to the government, license fees,
unions, organization... Someone is always taking a cut from the work you do.

If you really get to the bottom of all that, it's all based on fear. I could on on that,
but I won't.

Anyway... music and teaching privately: Would you disagree that it's pretty clear
if someone can play an instrument well or not? With the internet, there's plenty
of easy of ways to demonstrate this if someone is interested in finding out. With
a bit more work, and in a similar way, you can also demonstrate depth of musical
knowledge. Although, perhaps this isn't as clear cut. Lastly, can the person
teach?

The last question pretty much comes down to, you have to find out. This will either
come down to word of mouth or actually trying it out and even so, a given
teacher may not be right for all types of students. If you have pretty convincing
demonstrations of skill playing an instrument and knowledge, what more does a
"certificate" add? Is that any guarantee of a "better" teacher of music?

I'll just leave that question unanswered. It doesn't matter to me. Here in the US,
I don't need a certificate to teach privately, and that's all I plan on doing. Why
would I want to spend a lot of time and PAY to do that? I'll have sufficient skill
demonstration available for someone to decide. If they want to send little Johnnie
to a teacher with a "certificate", that's their choice.


Agreed

Which is why I have 16 students without certificate. I give first lesson free, if I play stuff and they like it/wanna learn it, then they make the decision for the lesson.

If you wanna do it full time, or without any other job, then you have to get a certificate or else tax comes knocking on ur door.

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(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#37
Look, this whole thread had degenerated into chatterring netheads on a forum
pontificating about stuff I don't care to either talk about or argue at this point.

If, I didn't make my situation clear, I'll try to be as clear as I can here (BIG LETTER
time ):

I am NOT looking for a CAREER. I HAVE/HAD a career. Between piano and guitar and
other sources I have had over 40 YEARS involvement with instruments and music.
Over the last several years I've learned quite a bit about the practice of guitar.
40 years doing ANYTHING is a perspective many of you will now find difficult to
imagine -- until you get there yourself. I think it has given me a unique perspective on
BOTH guitar and life that I'd like to share through teaching guitar.

I am ONLY looking for a small supplemental income and something to do in semi-
retirement. I am fortunate enough that my already LONG CAREER can pretty much
allow me to COMPLETELY retire well before "retirement age". In other words: I
DON'T NEED THE MONEY. Money is at the VERY BOTTOM of my motivation list.

If you think that makes me some shmuck setting up a private guitar instruction
at home, I DON'T CARE. My original question was simply, "What are some good
ways to find students?" It hasn't really be answered yet. If you have some
good ideas post here, if not, start another thread if you want to talk about the
finer points of guitar grades. certification and teaching.
Last edited by edg at Jan 12, 2009,
#38
Quote by edg
Look, this whole thread had degenerated into chatterring netheads on a forum
pontificating about stuff I don't care to either talk about or argue at this point.

If, I didn't make my situation clear, I'll try to be as clear as I can here (BIG LETTER
time ):

I am NOT looking for a CAREER. I HAVE/HAD a career. Between piano and guitar and
other sources I have had over 40 YEARS involvement with instruments and music.
Over the last several years I've learned quite a bit about the practice of guitar.
40 years doing ANYTHING is a perspective many of you will now find difficult to
imagine -- until you get there yourself. I think it has given me a unique perspective on
BOTH guitar and life that I'd like to share through teaching guitar.

I am ONLY looking for a small supplemental income and something to do in semi-
retirement. I am fortunate enough that my already LONG CAREER can pretty much
allow me to COMPLETELY retire well before "retirement age". In other words: I
DON'T NEED THE MONEY. Money is at the VERY BOTTOM of my motivation list.

If you think that makes me some shmuck setting up a private guitar instruction
at home, I DON'T CARE. My original question was simply, "What are some good
ways to find students?" It hasn't really be answered yet. If you have some
good ideas post here, if not, start another thread if you want to talk about the
finer points of guitar grades. certification and teaching.



I was at ur side actually.

I told you what I did to get students in my first post, if you DON't have a certificate to go to schools to "recruit" students.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#40
My only advice, not knowing your sense of design, is to look as professional as possible. When I do my daily craigslist perusal and I see a teacher's ad that looks like this:

PROFESSIONAL GUITAR PLAYER LESSONS 100% GOOD CLASSICAL JAZZ YOU NAME IT I TEACH IT ++++EXPERIENCE WORLD TOUR SOUL-SALESMAN GET GOOD QUICK &C. &C. &C.

I fight the urge to track down the unfortunate poster and slap him into some sense.

Get the word out wherever you can. Music departments at schools often have a bulletin board where they'll let you put a flyer if you ask. Ditto for guitar stores.


You definitely want the website, well made, you work with computers so I'm assuming that won't be much trouble. Not at all fancy, very clean is best, simple, easy to use. Make sure the content is easy to navigate, etc. But you know that.


Take advantage of your age: I've spoken with more than a few in their 40s and 50s (and beyond) that were interested in (re-)learning the instrument but hate the idea of taking lessons from someone half their age or less. Also there's a good chance you look a sight more respectable than the average just-beyond-teen, haircut needed, does-he-know-what-he's-doing? or the good old washed-up-rocker, style-stuck-in-1978, does-he-really-still-think-he-might-one-day-make-it-big?See if you can get a good picture (from a gig would be good, if it's quality) and make it prominent.


Also you might consider recording your lessons - it's a decent way to track student's progress (and your own as a teacher). And you've got something, if small, to wield if ever it comes down to your word against their word.
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