#2
Modal music and tonal music are not interchangeable. You're either playing locrian, or you're playing major. The major scale has a m7b5 chord on its seventh interval (so in Db Major, it's a Cm7b5). The locrian mode has a m7b5 on the root note. So if you're in C locrian, it's a Cm7b5, in D locrian it's Dm7b5 etc.
#4
Quote by liam177lewis
well they are, in that C Locrian and Db Major contain the same notes, and (rightly or wrongly), C Locrian is considered to be 'part of' Db Major.

but anyways, you answered my question, so thanks.


C locrian is not even remotely similar to Db major, and they are most certainly not the same thing. He is correct--they are not interchangeable.
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#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
C locrian is not even remotely similar to Db major, and they are most certainly not the same thing. He is correct--they are not interchangeable.


C Locrian: C, Db, Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb
Db Major: Db, Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, C

those are the same notes. you cannot possibly say they are not similar. the 'root' in C locrian is C, but you are always drawn towards the Db, as the C sounds unfinished and fairly stagnent to the musical ear.
#6
Quote by liam177lewis
C Locrian: C, Db, Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb
Db Major: Db, Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, C

those are the same notes. you cannot possibly say they are not similar. the 'root' in C locrian is C, but you are always drawn towards the Db, as the C sounds unfinished and fairly stagnent to the musical ear.


The fact that they have the same notes is irrelevant. They have different intervalic structures, different tonal centers, and are used in entirely different contexts. By your reasoning, all words that are anagrams of each other are the same word, and 12 and 21 are the same number.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
they have different intervalic structures, due largely to the fact that they are the same notes, but, when played in scale form they start and finish on a different note.

of course they sound different, or else modes wouldnt exist. they sound different as there is more focus on a different note, in this instance a C rather than a Db, while the notes inbetween remain the same.

i hardly see why this is necessary, i have the answer to my question. however, with all this arguing i am begining to wonder if my original question was understood at all.
#8
they have different intervalic structures, due largely to the fact that they are the same notes, but, when played in scale form they start and finish on a different note.


The note you start or end on is irrelevant.

Your question suggests that you have an insufficient understanding of basic music theory, and aren't ready to be worrying about modes. If you are in Db major, you would use the Db major scale. Locrian, and modes of any kind, have absolutely nothing to do with it. Modes are not something you throw in to spice up a solo whenever you want, they are used in works specifically constructed for them. Modes in general require special considerations when composing, and locrian in particular is extremely difficult to use and is something that, frankly, aren't ready to be worrying about. Read the mode sticky and focus on learning the basics.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by michal23
Modal music and tonal music are not interchangeable. You're either playing locrian, or you're playing major. The major scale has a m7b5 chord on its seventh interval (so in Db Major, it's a Cm7b5). The locrian mode has a m7b5 on the root note. So if you're in C locrian, it's a Cm7b5, in D locrian it's Dm7b5 etc.

well put
this guy is right


EDIT:

Modes are not something you throw in to spice up a solo whenever you want, they are used in works specifically constructed for them.


i think you can use modes to spice up a solo.
like if your doing improv over a progression in D minor, you can go back and forth from D minor, D harmonic minor, or D dorian.

the only thing is, im not sure if thats considered using modes, or just throwing in chromatic notes to spice it up.
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Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Jan 10, 2009,
#12

i think you can use modes to spice up a solo.
like if your doing improv over a progression in D minor, you can go back and forth from D minor, D harmonic minor, or D dorian.

the only thing is, im not sure if thats considered using modes, or just throwing in chromatic notes to spice it up.


It should most certainly be thought of as chromatic notes, if the progression is in D minor, there's no D Dorian going on.
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#13
^It's a matter of context and interpretation. Exactly when you start calling it Dorian instead of an accidental is a blurry line. There are no hard and fast rules. You can mix the scales as said and interpret the changes in the melody as moving from natural minor to harmonic minor to Dorian and it would be perfectly acceptable.
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#14
if you play a cm7b5 chord and try to resolve to a Db note, that won't work. you will need to resolve to a C, which would make the scale you are in C Locrian (assuming you have been playing the notes of the C locrian scale as well).
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Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
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along with fire escape routes...