#1
So I played these scales all the time but I never put them together.. if you know either the major or minor scale you can play any mode and major/minor scale just by finding where to start it... I know might be old stuff but it blew my mind how I never knew by using the F minor scale positions I could play C phrygian. Or I could play G major using E minor.

#2
and that's why you should learn the notes scales contains rather than just the patterns. The notes and intervals are absolute, they ARE the scale - however as you've discovered a pattern can be any number of things.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jan 9, 2009,
#5
Lol, these kinds of threads make me smile. :]
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#7
They share the same notes, but they're not the same. Please don't think you're ever soloing in D dorian over a C - Am - F - G progression, 'cause it's impossible. The scales and modes are determined by the harmony.