#1
ok i was on youtube and i came across a blues scale map and backting track and i was told all i have do is play any note in that key over that backing track and it will sound good so was just thinking to give a advice to a beginner like me what is the easist key a scale to solo in and can i have a backing track plz am pretty sure its a the E minor pentatonic
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#2
Any note in the scale of they key you're playing in will fit, but not necessarily sound good. Your phrasing is what really matters. There isn't a certain key or scale that's easier than another; that's all up to personal preference. If you have a backing track in E minor then play notes from the E minor scale. From there you really have to just follow your ear. It takes practice.
#3
basically that is how easy it is.. It is offcourse as difficult as you are willing to make it. But as longe as you stay in key(within the scale of whatever key the song is in) it wont sound horrible. So for example if your playing along a few chords in A minor then you want to use the intervalls 1 2 3b 4 5 6b 7b or the notes A B C D E F G. Also something i find very usefull is that you can make a chord/triad or dubbel stop out of any of these notes/intervals and it will be within that key(preferably with the root note fifth or third in it).

P.S the root(A) third(C) and fifht(E) are always good notes to sit on when improvising.

This post may be allover the place but its late, im tierd and i dont care ;P

//edit: of yeah and check out melodic control by Marty Friedman. Id post a link but it might be against the rules just google.
Last edited by tomten51 at Jan 9, 2009,
#4
Quote by Dhmking
ok i was on youtube and i came across a blues scale map and backting track and i was told all i have do is play any note in that key over that backing track and it will sound good


No, that's not true. It's not true at all really.

However, it's arguably true that using the blues scale over some progressions might be
the easiest in terms of getting your feet wet with improvisation. That is to say, with
the least understanding of music (theory), it may be the quickest to start sounding
decent. You still have to earn some skill at it. Just "playing any note" isn't going to
sound good under any circumstance (other than some occasional luck).
#5
That's a great start and it is that easy to get started. Mastering soloing is a dedication.

Remember, being musical is very very important. Without that, it will sound like your just blowing scales and arps over the chord progression.
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#6
Quote by Dhmking
ok i was on youtube and i came across a blues scale map and backting track and i was told all i have do is play any note in that key over that backing track and it will sound good so was just thinking to give a advice to a beginner like me what is the easist key a scale to solo in and can i have a backing track plz am pretty sure its a the E minor pentatonic


Not really - that's like saying "I came across this thing called the alphabet and I was told that I can use any of those letters in the English language so can i just use any of those letters and write a book?"
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#7
Improvising isn't hard or simple, cause it isn't a law of rules.

The only thing where you can say it's hard is Jazz, cause there are rules of following chords there. Even though these aren't strict rules, but if you don't keep to them (or show a true lack of understanding of chord tones) you won't "sound jazz".

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#8
Quote by xxdarrenxx
The only thing where you can say it's hard is Jazz, cause there are rules of following chords there. Even though these aren't strict rules, but if you don't keep to them (or show a true lack of understanding of chord tones) you won't "sound jazz".


Thats very true, but you can also just stick in the right pentatonic scale, wherein Blue Bossa you can play a C Minor/minor pentatonic scale, and in the second part you should play over the modes of Eb Dorian, or Eb minor pentatonic
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#9
It's not entirely true, however it's a great place to start. As you get better, you will start using full diatonic scales, develop your phrasing, use themes to give your solos structure etc.
#10
using any note in that key is not always going to sound good.
you need the right combinations of them, like licks.
im still learning improvising with looking at wich note i could use well after the other.
im pretty sure you would master improvising when you got that down.
#11
Quote by Dhmking
play any note in that key over that backing track and it will sound good so was just thinking to give a advice to a beginner like me what is the easist key a scale to solo in

To help you get an idea of what to do when improvising here's a little starter tab for you.

The E Minor Pentatonic Blues Scale.

--------------------------------12-15
---------------------------12-15
-------------------12-14-15
--------------12-14
------12-13-14
-12-15


The phrase.

---------------
---------------
-15-14-12-12-14
---------14------14
---------------
---------------


You know what the flat (b) 5 is right?
Last edited by mdc at Jan 10, 2009,