#1
I know the notes and scales etc and know that the chords above can change into themselves. But i don't know why or how. I just know that the pattern says they do? What am i missing??
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#3
well I'm not sure what you mean, but both groups of notes that you listed are basic I-VI-V chord progressions. The first one would be a chord progression for key of G and the second one would be for key of A. A, D, and E would be a whole step higher than G, C, and D. hope that helps
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#4
They're just transposed. A, D and E are one step above G, C and D. In other words, you just take whatever chords you're starting with, and move them up one step.
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#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
I'm not quite sure I understand your question. I'd like to help, though.


Sorry if that was unclear....i meant i know that the progression says these notes should be next (a step up) but i don't understand how i'm meant to know this? Is there some kind of formula or something that tells you what notes turn into what?

I think i may still be rambling.....basically i know something happens but don't know what, how or why??
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Last edited by The Daver at Jan 9, 2009,
#6
Are you wanting to know how to get to the I, IV, V positions from any given scale? If so, it's easy(I think). Just write out the scale in question, then count off those positions. Let's use A, G and D as examples.
The notes of this would be in this order:

A BC D E FGA = KEY OF A
I, IV, V

G AB C D EFG = KEY OF G
I, IV, V

D EF G A BCD = KEY OF D
I, IV, V

They start and end on the same note. You just count over from the begining note the number of positions needed for whichever run you want to perform. If it were a I, III, V run, then count 1,3,5 instead of 1,4,5. Somebody please correct me if this is wrong. I'm certainly no master when it comes to this stuff, and writing it out like this helps me as much as the TS. The part of this that screws me up is when adding half notes to make the full chromatic scale. The same scale, key of A, then looks like this:

A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A
I, IV, V

But to me that's wrong because then it's a chord run of A, C, C#. Not much flavor there for a song. What am I missing here? Am I not supposed to factor in half notes and only use whole notes for these?
Last edited by LeftyDave at Jan 10, 2009,
#7
^ you're actually pretty confused.
When you write out a scale to figure out the I, IV, V of a song, the I, III, V of a chord, or anything like that, you use the major scale. A major scale is not just starting on one note and going through the alphabet till you get back to where you started, you have to use the major scale formula which is (steps) Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole Half. So you do have it right in that you start on the note of the scale you're trying to figure out, but then you have to use the major scale formula. So the A, G, and D scales you wrote out should look like this:

W W H W W W H
A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A = A major scale
G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G= G major scale
D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D= D major scale
(and I put the steps above the first one so you can see how that works)

Then you can take the I, IV, V or the I, III, V, or whatever you need to build a chord, different scale, transpose a song, or whatever.
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#8
Oh this is getting really confusing now!

If i want to change from one key to another how do i know if the progression is a 1, 3, 5 or 1, 4, 5 etc?

I understand now that i take all the notes from the scale and count the ones i need based on the progression i just don't know how to figure out what the progression is??
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#9
Quote by ninjafingers
^ you're actually pretty confused.
When you write out a scale to figure out the I, IV, V of a song, the I, III, V of a chord, or anything like that, you use the major scale. A major scale is not just starting on one note and going through the alphabet till you get back to where you started, you have to use the major scale formula which is (steps) Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole Half. So you do have it right in that you start on the note of the scale you're trying to figure out, but then you have to use the major scale formula. So the A, G, and D scales you wrote out should look like this:

W W H W W W H
A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A = A major scale
G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G= G major scale
D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D= D major scale
(and I put the steps above the first one so you can see how that works)

Then you can take the I, IV, V or the I, III, V, or whatever you need to build a chord, different scale, transpose a song, or whatever.


Thank you. That's the part I was missing, the WWH formula. And yet, I still arrive at the same notes that you did, but only for the I, IV, V, not the other. And shouldn't your F# in the A maj scale be a whole note, F? According to the formula, it is.
This part of theory is why I rarely get involved in these discussions. Good stuff to know.
#10
Quote by LeftyDave
And shouldn't your F# in the A maj scale be a whole note, F? According to the formula, it is.


The F# is a whole step from the E, so he/she is right.
#11
Quote by The Daver
Oh this is getting really confusing now!

If i want to change from one key to another how do i know if the progression is a 1, 3, 5 or 1, 4, 5 etc.?

Just count it out. You should know what key the song is in, and what key you want it to be in, so count it out just like with the other thing. Write out your scale, then count till you get to the chord you're trying to transpose, and then you'll know what degree it is. Or an easier way you can transpose is to just go up or down however many steps you're transposing. For instance, if you're going from A to C, that's a step and a half, so you can know that all the other chords are gonna be a step and a half higher. Hope this helps, it's kinda hard to explain all this over the internet.
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