#1
i'm pretty much a n00b when it comes to electric

i've been wondering,
how does higher gauge strings effect a guitars playability and intonation?

at the moment i have .010-.052 Ernie Balls on my Les Paul Copy, and it doesn't quite sound right. plus the string tension on my A and D strings is giving my fingers a real workout

should i get lower gauge strings?

or

are theri enough pros to stik with thicker strings?
#2
I personally prefer thinner.

But I've tried thicker, generally, they have a better tone because there is more tension due to the larger guage.

But higher tension makes it harder to bend... sometimes even to fret... so I prefer thinner strings, I feel that it's easier to 'shred' on them.
#3
I like 10-52s personally. You will adjust to them eventually if you stick with them. The gauge affects the tone, but it's neither good or bad, just personal preference so go with whatever is comfortable/sounds better in your opinion...

Playability.. obviously it's going to be harder to bend with thicker strings.. harder to push them down... etc. Depends on what you are used to. I push down to hard and put everything out of tune when I first pick up a guitar with 9s.

Intonation... will probably need some adjusting if you switch gauges.
Last edited by Post?Organic at Jan 10, 2009,
#5
one quick question...

my strings kinda still have that "new strings" sound; all metallicy and tinny

i there any way to kinda "break" the strings and make them sound more (for lack of better word) organic?
#6
high gauge - higher sound and ideal for standard tuning and d I think
Low guage - deep sound and good for c and b tuning..

thats what i think
#7
^The more you play, the quicker the "new string sound" goes away.
Quote by Schecter_6661
high gauge - higher sound and ideal for standard tuning and d I think
Low guage - deep sound and good for c and b tuning..

thats what i think

You've got them mixed up. High gauge means thicker strings, which is better for low tunings and vice versa.
Last edited by leephan at Jan 10, 2009,
#8
Quote by tremonti_4ever
one quick question...

my strings kinda still have that "new strings" sound; all metallicy and tinny

i there any way to kinda "break" the strings and make them sound more (for lack of better word) organic?

I just got new strings...just play some riffs on it for a while and they should lessen down
#9
Quote by leephan
^The more you play, the quicker the "new string sound" goes away.

You've got them mixed up. High gauge means thicker strings, which is better for low tunings and vice versa.

No im pretty sure im right...I just switched from mid guage to low..my strings are thicker
#10
Quote by Schecter_6661
No im pretty sure im right...I just switched from mid guage to low..my strings are thicker

Woops! My bad. I was the one who had it mixed up.
#11
also another question

ive noticed with thicker strings that when i play chords and even single notes higher up the fretboard, they are always slightly off tune

is this just a situation where i have to press harder in order to get perfectly in pitch notes or does this have anything to do with my guitar's setup (truss rod, frets, etc??)\

thanx
#12
Could be you intonation needs a little tweak, I notice you say you're using 10-52 which is kinda a hybrid gauge and you specificly mention your A and D strings are hard on your fingers, maybe try 10-46, that way you won't notice much of a difference on your high strings but you lower strings will be easier to deal with.