#1
Iyyerrr !

i was wondering, how can i get a really nice sounding blues tone from my Vox AD30 VT, see, i would mess around with it, but i though it would be more easier to ask the UG community as ima no good with bass treble and mids etc..


Thanks!

Jamie.


Gear:
-Tokai Les Paul Custom w/ Seymour Duncan Custom Custom & Pearly Gates
-Westfield B200
-Ibanez GRG170DXL

-VOX AD30VT
-Fender MD-20
-Marshall MG15DFX

Dunlop Cry Baby
-Digitech RP70
#2
thick strings
loads of bass and the neck pickup
Gear
Ibanez RG2EX2
Epiphone Les Paul
Fender Strat
Homemade EVH
Marshall JCM 800 Combo

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#3
^^^ Myth created by SRV. Many people including myself can get SRV tone out of 9s or 10s, and the difference from 10s to 11s (I have 11s on my strat) is not noticeable to me in tone. Thus I just go with thinner strings that effectively make my playing better rather than a small difference in tone.

TS, Mess with your amp.

EQ is personal, mess with it. But you must *have* mids for blues. Scooping is not allowed in this genre.

I don't know the presets on your amp but look for a Tweed setting, turn up your bass and middle and play on your neck pickup.

/blues
"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
Last edited by SlinkyBlue at Jan 10, 2009,
#4
Mids, neck pup, and reverb baby!
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#5
unless you want a biting blues tone, then use the same eq but neck pickup
Call me Dom
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{Pedalboard Thread Native: The Muffin Man}
#6
Use the Tweed 4x10 setting, low bass, half treble, and set mids to taste. That's pretty much it.
#7
Quote by imgooley
Use the Tweed 4x10 setting, low bass, half treble, and set mids to taste. That's pretty much it.


This.

+ gain anywhere from 11 o'clock to 2 o'clock, volume around 3 o'clock. The low bass would probably be good with your gear, with my strat copy I pump it up a bit.
My Stuff:
Austin Strat Copy - Lefty
(New and Improved with Bill Lawrence 290/280 Pickups)
MIM Telecaster - Lefty
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
TS-9 with a few mods
Dunlop GCB-95 Wah
#8
For me a bluesy tone is the combination of of the right guitar and amp setup. I like the amp to be clean with a light touch but to break up when I play harder. I don't like a really low action. I want to be able to dig in really hard without fret buzz.
#9
Quote by gregs1020
Mids, neck pup, and reverb baby!


that and a tube screamer for leads and your all set...
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(='.'=)
(")_(") This is bunny. Copy him into your signature to help him acheive world dominance.
#10
Tweed setting. Settings to taste, whatever pickup selector or guitar strikes your taste. Real blues isn't about sounding like another SRV clone.
#11
I think blues players generally each have a pretty unique tone, so it's kinda hard to give advice... What player's tones do you like?
Gear...
Peavey 5150, Squier, Ibanez RG2EX2, Yamaha F150, Ibanez RT150, MXR noisegate
#12
neck or middle pickup (or middle position on an H-H guitar). singlecoils are usually preferable but its more taste than anything else. vingate styled amp with a loose, fat response. heaps of mids, just enough treble and bass. gain should be from the point of breakup to medium gain.

thats what i do and i like my tone.
#13
I like to use lots of bass and mids and use the neck/middle single coil pickups on my guitar.
#15
On a Les Paul guitar I def, prefer the middle position for leads, try it out.

Quote by SlinkyBlue
^^^ Myth created by SRV. Many people including myself can get SRV tone out of 9s or 10s, and the difference from 10s to 11s (I have 11s on my strat) is not noticeable to me in tone. Thus I just go with thinner strings that effectively make my playing better rather than a small difference in tone.

TS, Mess with your amp.

EQ is personal, mess with it. But you must *have* mids for blues. Scooping is not allowed in this genre.

I don't know the presets on your amp but look for a Tweed setting, turn up your bass and middle and play on your neck pickup.

/blues


On my reverend the 11s make a difference compared to tens.

Might just be a placebo, but I honestly feel that they sound better and allow me that heavier vibrato easier.

Makes your fingers strong as hell too.
#16
Quote by SlinkyBlue
^^^ Myth created by SRV. Many people including myself can get SRV tone out of 9s or 10s, and the difference from 10s to 11s (I have 11s on my strat) is not noticeable to me in tone. Thus I just go with thinner strings that effectively make my playing better rather than a small difference in tone.

TS, Mess with your amp.

EQ is personal, mess with it. But you must *have* mids for blues. Scooping is not allowed in this genre.

I don't know the presets on your amp but look for a Tweed setting, turn up your bass and middle and play on your neck pickup.

/blues

Yeah I use 9's with an SG and can get a very thick tone.


I think thicker strings help slightly but I actually like the tone of the 9's with my guitar better. And the playability of course too.