#2
No, not really. There will be a slight difference, but the difference you will hear initially will be just from having new strings.
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#3
not really as lbj273 said.

11's are the sh!t!!!
Guitars:
'13 MIM Fender Strat - '05 Epi G-400
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#5
From my experience, you do get a slightly better tone from using heavier strings, but the difference is minimal. I've found I have a lot more difficulty bending on 11's than 10's though. I've stuck with 10's because of that.
#6
Try them and see. What guitar do you want to fit 11s on. 11s will feal stiffer than 10s, 10s feel stiffer than 9s. You need to find a the right strings for you. No point to fit 11s if you can't play them well. You may well get used to them but then again you may not. Try them once if after an month you still find them too stiff then go back to 10s.
Last edited by stujomo at Jan 10, 2009,
#7
I heard a huge difference when I changed from .09's to .10's, I would expect the same with changing to 11's, but I like the way 10's feel.
Schecter Gryphon; Ibanez AEG20E
Peavey Rage 158 ; TRAYNOR YCS50
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#8
I'll just add that if you do move up, it will take a bit of time for your hand/finger strength to improve - especially if you do a lot bends and such. So it may be hard to tell on 'better or worse' for a week or so or whatever.
#9
I noticed a big difference in my tone switching from 9 - 46s to straight 10s. 11s may get you a bit of a warmer/fatter sound, but d on't go much higher than that unless you're tuning down super low. I've got 12 - 56s on one of my guitars tuned to double drop B (B F# B E G# B) and the tone on the higher strings is nice, but pretty warm (with stock pickups it's a tad muddy depending on what you're doing).
#10
theres a diffrence dependng on teh guitar... im a strat guy and 11's sound alot diffrent from 10's on a guitar with buckers it will sound about the same...
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#11
Quote by cratskomodo
Will there be a considerable tone difference?


I do believe so. I switched back from 11-48 to 10-52's, and my leads sounded a but less full. It wasnt worth the but of tone i got out of them. I like being able to bend very easily, but still have a good chunk. Gotta love skinny top heavy bottoms!
Gibson Les Paul Custom
Fender American Tele

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Orange PPC412
#12
dude seriously that is to big of a string for me but to each his own.

I did not notice a difference in tone when I experimented with 11's but that doesn't mean that someone else can't hear the difference. Im sure 11's affects the tone but I don't think it is going to make a big difference. Move the humbuckers closer the strings too if your really trying to get a beefy tone.
Last edited by mostly I hate u at Jan 11, 2009,
#13
i dont think there would be a considerable tone difference.. and i really think heavier gauge gives a bit nice tone... no offence meant.
#14
It's not a huge difference, but there is a difference for sure.
Gear...
Peavey 5150, Squier, Ibanez RG2EX2, Yamaha F150, Ibanez RT150, MXR noisegate
#15
I think having thicker strings improves sustain, more than tone. the tonal change you get from having thicker strings is basically just a bit tighter bass response and a slightly more balanced sound, which isn't too noticable unless you listen out for it.
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