#1
im trying to find out something but im not sure how to ask..iv seen it talked about but everyone knew what it was so it didnt tell me anything...

your playing and mode or a scale and theres some center note? tonal center maybe..but i thought it was called something else? im not seeing it on the theory lessons can anyone help me with this? maybe the proper name even
Last edited by metalmetalhead at Jan 10, 2009,
#3
yet again..i see nothing about the tonal center of any scales or chords..i have all kinds of theory stuff wrote down right in front of me and im even looking in the "great beginning lesson" which i thought has everything in it...

im not saying i know alot of theory..i know chord contruction, extentions, altering, the chormatic theory to understand all the other scales..intervals not to sure about progression but thats not my question...

like i said even the correct name for what im looking for would help me. tonal center? is that just another name for root note? maybe its only called that in modes? maybe its not called that at all but i know the word center is in it.
#6
i read from wikipedia.
"The tonic is often confused with the root, which is the reference note of a chord, rather than that of the scale."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonal_center

would this mean that the root note is really only involed in chords? and the tonic is the acutally name for scales based in the diatonic method?
#10
To TS, The tonic is the first degree of a scale.

In the key of E, the tonic is E.

E B C D are all major chords?
E Major: E G# B
B Major: B D# F#
C Major: C E G
D Major: D F# A
The first note is the root, the next note is the "third", the next one is the "fifth", because they are all built from their respective scales, taking the first, third, and fifth notes.

E Major scale: E F# G# A B C# D# E
Take the first, third, and fifth. You get E, G#, B. That's what makes up an E major chord.

I hope I didn't explain something you already knew.
Last edited by one vision at Jan 10, 2009,
#11
well thats great!!! thanks for the help. its difficult to see how it will benifit right now but im sure later on as i progress it will help alot.

really gives me more understanding of the root notes and the tonic..i guess i thought the tonic was the root....lol anyway thanks alot
#12
yea i know the intervals and i guess u could say inntermidate chord contruction..

but now im a bit confused. the way i was looking at it "tonic"= key of song. "root"=key of chords/scales in the song.

if u wanted to play a solo to my rhythem. i tell you that the key or tonic is E. i guess u could also call it the "main root".

but from what your saying is..tonic is the same as root. if thats the case then tonic and diatonic scales are just another form of understanding music..u can read them as numbers, words, and worded numbers aka m2nd M2nd etc.

am i missing something? lol
#13
Quote by metalmetalhead
i read from wikipedia.
"The tonic is often confused with the root, which is the reference note of a chord, rather than that of the scale."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonal_center

would this mean that the root note is really only involed in chords? and the tonic is the acutally name for scales based in the diatonic method?
What they're saying is that the tonic is scale/key based. So a piece in C major would have a tonic of C. C would always be the tonic.

The root however is the root of the chord. When the chord changes you can have root movement which creates harmonic progression (or regression), but the tonic will still always be C.

So a movement from the dominant to tonic in C would be a G major chord to a C major chord. The root changes from G to C but the tonic is always C.

This does help when you start looking at Cadences harmonic progressions chord substitutions and anything else involved with analysing root movements.

Best of Luck
Si
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
What they're saying is that the tonic is scale/key based. So a piece in C major would have a tonic of C. C would always be the tonic.

The root however is the root of the chord. When the chord changes you can have root movement which creates harmonic progression (or regression), but the tonic will still always be C.

So a movement from the dominant to tonic in C would be a G major chord to a C major chord. The root changes from G to C but the tonic is always C.

This does help when you start looking at Cadences harmonic progressions chord substitutions and anything else involved with analysing root movements.

Best of Luck



thank you professer...lol thats a great way of putting it. i try to find lessons more detailed on some of this stuff but its all filled with stuff i already know. but its another day and imma try again..