#1
I am the leader of a 4 piece band. My brother and I sing and play guitar in this band but the bassist and drummer do not sing. I would really like them to learn to sing because having the extra voices can help greatly for harmony and such. Now I can sing fairly well, and I receive compliments for my voice but I'm not entirely sure about how to teach these two guys to sing. I am going to teach them intervals and have them practice with me on a piano and then after they are proficient enough in just attaining each pitch I'll have them harmonize with various easy pitches such as Major 3rds, Perfect 5ths, etc. I also hope this will build there music theory because they lack heavily there. Does anyone else have any suggestions for training vocals that may help my band mates or even myself with vocals?
The cowbell paradox...
#2
Seriously, 2 singers is enough, leave the rhythm section alone.
But if you're going to anyway, teach them how to sing with their diaphragm first and have them ascend Major scales singing 'DO RE MI FA SO LA TI DO'.
But if they can't sing it's not worth pushing them into it.
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#3
Teach them to be wicked screamers.
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#4
hahah nah were not a scream band X) We get by with the two of us on vocals but the more the merrier. And yes i was going to have them go through major scales which helped me a lot. I feel that they may become better singers if i just teach them theory in general because at times they don't even know they sound off while singing... so I'm sure if they learn some theory to hear what sounds on key then they can learn faster. So I'll run them through basic theory.
The cowbell paradox...
#5
well unless you have a pretty good idea of what your doing, then i would say dont. send them to a teacher. if you teach them the wrong thing, then you could do more harm than good. also, remember that they have opinions too. if they dont want to sing, then dont force them. unless they agree without any argument what so ever, and they seem to be into it, then imo it would be better to just leave it.
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
Last edited by Dunjma at Jan 11, 2009,
#6
Quote by Dunjma
well unless you have a pretty good idea of what your doing, then i would say dont. send them to a teacher. if you teach them the wrong thing, then you could do more harm than good. also, remember that they have opinions too. if they dont want to sing, then dont force them. unless they agree with any argument what so ever, and they seem to be into it, them imo, i think it would be better to just leave it.


^This.

It's also worth remembering that many people find suddenly playing and singing at the same time practicaly impossible. Those that are best at it are those that learned to sing at the same time as learning to play, those that developed doing both at the same time from the beginning.
Add vocal duties to a musician who's not used to doing vocals and you will probably find that their playing suffers beause they are trying to concentrate on two different things.
#7
I would agree with Dunjma too.

However, I think what you are trying to achieve is awesome. It shows commitment and dedication on your part, and on the part of the other musicians who are willing to continue their own development. The end result can really only be a good thing if it is implemented properly.

The number of singers can really define your sound. Sure, the beach boys are an extreme example, but even the '80's hair metal bands relied on huge backing vocals for their 'sound.' It can make a great difference, and many bands have signed their 'non-lead singers' up for vocal lessons for the reasons you are suggesting.

See if you can find a good teacher and get a group rate happening. Good singing isn't as much about learning good pitch, it is about learning good technique. Good pitch will come about as a result of learning good technique.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
On a day-to-day basis, encouraging them to sing along to music as they listen to it, and actively think about how close to the right pitch they are. I found that helps. But yeah, as above, proper lessons are the important bit.
#9
wow. both Slacker and Chris agreed with something i said. that's going on my resume haha.
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#10
Quote by axemanchris
I would agree with Dunjma too.

However, I think what you are trying to achieve is awesome. It shows commitment and dedication on your part, and on the part of the other musicians who are willing to continue their own development. The end result can really only be a good thing if it is implemented properly.

The number of singers can really define your sound. Sure, the beach boys are an extreme example, but even the '80's hair metal bands relied on huge backing vocals for their 'sound.' It can make a great difference, and many bands have signed their 'non-lead singers' up for vocal lessons for the reasons you are suggesting.

See if you can find a good teacher and get a group rate happening. Good singing isn't as much about learning good pitch, it is about learning good technique. Good pitch will come about as a result of learning good technique.


CT

Agreed, rather than teaching them or trying to make them learn to sing, simply encourage them to widen their general musical ability, including singing, and get them to seek out the best way for them to learn and expand on thet learning themselves.
Quote by Dunjma

wow. both Slacker and Chris agreed with something i said. that's going on my resume haha.


Heh, I can just picture it now.

'So Mr Dunjma, what reasons can you give for why you think we should employ you in our company?'

'Well, Slacker and Chris both agreed with me once'

'Next!'


or possibly...

'Slacker and Chris?'
'Yep!'
'From UG?'
'Uh huh.'
'Welcome to the company m'boy! By the way, this is the secret handshake, guard it with your life!'
#11
haha, yea that'll be the day..
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?