#1
I've been taking lessons for about 12 weeks now and honestly can say I haven't learned a thing. Everything I have learned, which is not much at all, came from a book or YouTube. I'm not interested in reading music or complicated theory or impossible scales. I'd be happy with learning songs as we went along. I've been strumming about 10+ years so know all the usual chords, have no issues changing chords but do struggle with naming chords that are not in the open position and naming power chords, again because they are not in the open position.

Am I not a good customer/consumer and going in and saying specifically what I want? I'm thinking of printing off the tab to a song, 2 copies and bring it to my nest lesson and saying "help me play this" (Pink Floyd's Coming Back to Life). I'm also considering bringing my laptop and putting in the concert DVD Pulse and goto the specific track and watch as we read off the tab.

Any suggestions? I'm not about to give up but maybe look for a different teacher???? I feel like i wasted $300.

--JK
#3
To answer your title, you should feel as though you are progressing after lessons, whether it be technically or theoretically.

If all you want to do is learn songs and you feel as though you wasted $300, stop taking lessons. You don't need a teacher to learn songs. It helps sometimes but is completely unnecessary.
#4
the whole point of getting better at guitar is knowing wat note is wat..u need to learn theory and scales are very important, all these little things improve ur playing as a whole, whether it be picking accuracy/speed or finger speed or wateva


Quote by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course
#5
Firstly I'm totally self taught, so wht I say may be of no use. I found I really progressed when I just learnt what each note is at each fret and string. It helped me to remember what I was actually playing, but that about as far as my "conventional" theory knowledge goes.

I can't read music, and I know hardly any scales, but I like tothink I understand music. y that I have reasonably good idea of what can go together.

As I said I'd recommend a first step of just learning the notes up and down the neck fro each string using something like this: http://www.steve-nelson.co.uk/Neck%20Chart.jpg

For ages, and even know to a point, I have to count up from the nut to work out what it is, but it has helped me a lot.
#6
I agree as I do need to take a bit of responsibility here. "Playing" for over 10 years now and not even knowing the names of the strings and corresponding notes is pathetic. I do know the notes and the progression but only if I am helped with a starting point. I know, lame but I do want to progress and actually play.

The one thing I remember vividly was in 4th grade. I convinced my parents to let me take guitar lessons and after 3 weeks since i wasn't playing like Jimmy Page I stopped taking lessons. My parents said.....we should make you continue because you will thank us later and you will regret quitting.....DAMN they were right. Starting at 35 is better late than never.

--JK
#7
Quote by DoubleyouW
Either tell him what you want to learn, or switch teachers.

+1

Theory and scales are important in the long run but you can learn those from books. I took lessons when I started out but the best learning experience I've ever had was playing with others.
#8
I feel your pain,as ex president Clinton used to say to us.I have been playing along time ,still I struggle with new things.Hume,did he say new things?
Yes,I did.You must learn something new all the time.I have had at least 10 guitar player/teachers and,like you I learned nothing.
How can a person tell a teacher what he needs to learn,when he is there to learn?The teacher should be showing you what you need to know.Well having said that here is what
I recommened:
1st Learn the names of the bar chords/power chords what ever you use.
2nd, start learning your notes,I know I know.Theory uug!
3rd,Don't try playing others music.
4th Record a rythym like this, G Em C Am and learn your Gmajor pentatonic scale.
That will fit in there really nice.

To some up stop paying to watch guitar players play.Just because they can play what they can play,don't mean they should be teaching.I know I have been playing for over 25 years and a good guitar is har to find.Hang in there. Grain
#9
Quote by SeaNile
I've been taking lessons for about 12 weeks now and honestly can say I haven't learned a thing. Everything I have learned, which is not much at all, came from a book or YouTube. I'm not interested in reading music or complicated theory or impossible scales. I'd be happy with learning songs as we went along. I've been strumming about 10+ years so know all the usual chords, have no issues changing chords but do struggle with naming chords that are not in the open position and naming power chords, again because they are not in the open position.

Am I not a good customer/consumer and going in and saying specifically what I want? I'm thinking of printing off the tab to a song, 2 copies and bring it to my nest lesson and saying "help me play this" (Pink Floyd's Coming Back to Life). I'm also considering bringing my laptop and putting in the concert DVD Pulse and goto the specific track and watch as we read off the tab.

Any suggestions? I'm not about to give up but maybe look for a different teacher???? I feel like i wasted $300.

--JK

Stop taking lessons then - you've kind of got the wrong idea about them.

Guitar teachers are supposed to do just that....teach you how to play the guitar, they should be helping you develop the skills and knowledge you need to get better. They're NOT there to help you learn songs, you're supposed to do that yourself, indeed any teacher who does resort to teaching songs to someone isn't much of a teacher at all.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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...it's a seagull

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#10
Put more effort into understanding the stuff he has given you for that week then you might get more out of it.
Today is yesterday's tomorrow.
#11
Quote by TheBabySnatcher
Put more effort into understanding the stuff he has given you for that week then you might get more out of it.

+1

further to what I already said, the whole point of learning stuff like theory, and fundamental techniques/concepts is that they will help you learn the stuff you want to play. There's a whole world of difference between blindly following a tab or chord sheet and actually having a degree of understanding of what it is you're looking at...the more you understand about the instrument in general the easier you'll find it to learn the pieces you're perhaps struggling with. Stuff like naming powerchords/barre chords is pretty basic stuff, I'm not surprised you're struggling in that respect because it means anything past the 3rd fret is pretty much unknown territory for you.

It's like Karate Kid - it might not be what you think you want to be learning but it all fits in somewhere, and it's a lot more important than you realise.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Last edited by steven seagull at Jan 13, 2009,
#12
You don't really need a teacher if all you want to do is noodle around on the guitar. Stick with books and videos.
#13
I do want to learn theory and more to the guitar. My point is after 12 weeks I don't think I have learned much.

--JK
#14
I'd suggest getting a new teacher. Just after 8 weeks of lessons I was incredibly better. Your teacher may not even know what he's doing or is just lazy.
Famous last words are for men who never said enough. - Anonymous
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