#1
My band are doing an acoustic gig in two weeks and I want to use the mandolin in some way. The difficulty is in the translation, I'm a new to the instrument and the differences in intervals in the strings is difficult.

At the moment this theory is doing my head in, and all I can do is play the actual chords of the same name, namely C major, F Major and E minor.

I find this a wee bit boring, despite the different inversions.

Could some one suggest some other chords or a riff to help?

Potentially any of these songs are going to be included www.myspace.com/incrediboymusic

All Help gratefully appreciated. Thanks

Incrediboy xo
#2
You ought to learn some chord shapes on mandolin.


Minor shape, root note on the G and E strings.

E|---5---|
A|---3---|
D|---2---|
G|---2---|

Same but major.

E|---5---|
A|---4---|
D|---2---|
G|---2---|


Minor, root note on the D string. You can skip the G string for a "cleaner" sound/easier grip.

E|---3---|
A|---2---|
D|---2---|
G|---4---|

... and the major version.

E|---4---|
A|---2---|
D|---2---|
G|---4---|




Just find out where the root notes of the chords you need to play are and mess around with those shapes and you should be able to get it to sound decent.
#3
so for c major I would play ...?

e --5--
a --3--
d --3--
g --5--

And F major would be ...?

E|---4---|
A|---3---|
D|---1---|
G|---1---|


???

Thanks for the help...
#4
The first one would be a F major (remember, root note for that shape is on the d-string), the second one would be a G# major.

Here's the shapes/positions I'd use:

C major

e --8--
a --7--
d --5--
g --5--

F major

e --5--
a --3--
d --3--
g --5--


and E minor (since you mentioned that)

e --3--
a --2--
d --2--
g --4--

Bolded the root notes.