#1
I'm trying to understand music theory....I've been playing guitar for a while but just copying songs note for note, I want to try improvising using chord phrasing little Jimi does in little wing and i understand this can be achieved by using riffs and double stops based around the CAGED system but what happens with minor chords??

If i had a chord sequence C G Am i could......

Play C major blues scale over the C chord using the "E" form on the 8th fret and then with G I could play a riff in the same scale using an open G posisition....that all make sense to me but what happens when you hit the Am do you just riff over A blues scale "E" Form at the 5th fret for example or would you switch to a minor blues scale???
#2
I don't understand the CAGED system, so i ignored it. But i am learning circle of fifths, and have got a lot of it down, maybe if you don't understand caged learn the circle instead?
#4
is that where the whole relative major/minor thing comes into play?

what happens if i want to play over a different minor chord fm/g#m etc etc? how does the CAGED system work then if i want to play a little wing type rythem ??

thanks for your answers btw
Last edited by M_townsend at Jan 11, 2009,
#5
Quote by M_townsend
is that where the whole relative major/minor thing comes into play?

what happens if i want to play over a different minor chord fm/g#m etc etc? how does the CAGED system work then if i want to play a little wing type rythem ??

thanks for your answers btw


yes. the second part of your question i didnt understand, I'll come back and read it later and see if I can explain.
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#6
If you're over a modal progression (like in Little Wing), you can also use the pentatonic of whatever chord you are over (major pentatonic for major chords, minor pentatonic for minor chords). This is useful when you're fretting the bass notes with your thumb, as you're always in first position. You'll notice most of the licks in Little Wing are made up this way.
#7
CAGED system is not a style or method. Its an acronym for scale patterns in a given key. For instance, play a C chord. Bar or capo at third fret and play an A chord. The shape is A, but at that particular location, it is a C chord. Bar or capo at the fifth fret and play a G. Once again, shape has changed, but the chord has not.

As far as how it deals with the minors, it works like this:

In key of C, A is the relative minor. In the Key of A, F# is the minor. In G, its Em. E, C#.

Say your song is in the key of C. You have built a solo around the E shape/power chord at the eighth fret. You come to an A minor in the song. You can either slide back a bit to the fifth fret and play an E minor, or you can slide up the neck to the twelfth fret and play an A minor. Help you out any?
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#8
The CAGED system can be used with chords and scales respectively, but i wouldn't get bogged down with it if i were you. Yes, it teaches you to view the neck in 5 different positions but it can also confuse the hell out of others who are starting it. Your question however does not relate to the system in question, more along the lines of note and scale choice. That is your call entirely.

You can stay in one position and shift a few notes around to accomodate your progression if you wish or you could just find the strong notes in one shape and make a meal out of it. CAGED system is good to know, but not necessary to solo. If you know your key up and down the fretboard, you'll already have used the system but also have surpassed it greatly and progressed to the next level... ie: using the neck and being able to play whats needed and not relying on a shape to get you somewhere.

I probably didn't help but hopefully did in some way