#1
How many watts do I need, if I want to start gigging with my band? I think the goal should be to leave the drums acoustic with no mics and be able to play loud enough with them. 30 isn't enough, right?
Thanks!
#3
30 watts tube is probably enough
30 watts Solid state wont be, but it'd be close
maybe go 40/50 watts tube to stay clean easily and just in case
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#5
Quote by Amarant
How many watts do I need, if I want to start gigging with my band? I think the goal should be to leave the drums acoustic with no mics and be able to play loud enough with them. 30 isn't enough, right?
Thanks!

30 watts tube is, 50 might be nicer to your cleans though. And yes, read the stickies.
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#6
What genre?
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#7
30w of valve amp should certainly cut it but 30w of solid state may struggle. Having said that, the money you'd be spending on a 30w valve amp would put you in the territory of a solid state amp with twice the power of a 30w.
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#9
Quote by Doadman
30w of valve amp should certainly cut it but 30w of solid state may struggle. Having said that, the money you'd be spending on a 30w valve amp would put you in the territory of a solid state amp with twice the power of a 30w.


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#10
Here's the answer:

it all depends on how loud your drummer plays. With a soft hitting drummer, 30 watts is enough to get over them, hard hitting means cranking it and it doesn't sound good and still is a little too quiet. This is of course for a solid state amp. For a solid state, you need at least 50 watts to get comfortably over a drummer.

For tube it is much different. It depends on the circuitry of the amp. I have a 15 watt Class A amp and it EASILY gets over a drummer but not clean, it is crunchy. For getting over a drummer without the signal getting crunchy or overdriven, you need to get more watts. It all depends if you need clean headroom or not.

hope this helped, i just went through the same situation with upgrading from my MG30DFX to my TT
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#11
Depends on the genre, if there's some brutal double bass drumming or a thrashy beat then you might need a little more than 30 in a tube amp. If you're looking at classic rock or hard rock then the 30 should be ok. If that fails tell the drummer to get some brushes or something else softer than sticks.
#12
Quote by Ghold125
the "read the stickies" watts

instead of being a backseat moderator, why not just answer the question, or just not post at all?

Wattage depends on a lot of things, like how loud your drummer plays, and indeed what particular amp it is, but here's a rough guideline to the kind of wattage you should be looking at for gigs:

If you get a tube amp, 30 watts should be plenty for small/medium gigs, if not, mic it up. Try not to go overboard with the wattage with tube amps as they tend to sound better when the volume is just at the point where it just starts to distort naturally.

If you're getting a solid state, 75 watts should cover it, but since they sound the same at any volume, and shouldn't be pushed past their maximum amplitude, there's nothing wrong with getting more watts than you need to prevent power amp clipping.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#13
Depends.

You need more watts if you need a loud clean tone.

You need less watts if you want your amp to crunch at a lower volume

You need more watts if you use alot of preamp gain.

You need less watts if you don't use alot of gain.

You need more watts if you want to scoop your mids.

You need less watts if you run your mids flat or boosted.

You need more watts if your amp needs to carry the room.

You need less watts if you can mic your amp.
#14
At the moment my main amp is a 12 watt Princeton and it is more than enough to get great clean tone over the top of a drummer. I also have a Marshall style 18 watt which can't get clean tone at all. My 45 watt low power tweed twin has about the same output as my 12 watt Princeton. The moral of the story is that output can be extremely misleading! Output is supposed to be measured in amount of volume before the signal starts to distort but some amps distort at their lowest volume, does that mean they have no output?

If you are looking for clean tone then a black face style amp at around 12 watts is enough to play over a drummer. A tweed style amp will need about 35 watts to get enough cleans tone to get over your drummer. If you are looking at Marshall amps you need at least 40 watts but really the Marshall cleans are a bit lacking. If cleans are not what you are after then that changes everything. You can get great dirty tone from any ol' tube at that is more that 15 watts. As long as you stick to small venues there are no worries.

Of course all that is under the assumption that you are looking for valve amps. If you want a solid state amp then double the numbers.
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#15
We play hard rock music, but most of us listen to metal, so we have a metal feel to it, I guess. I play with clean too, but mostly distorted. The drummer does double bass sometimes and claims to be with a hard hit. He doesn't hold himself back, that's for sure.
So to take all your posts together: a 30 watt tube amp would do it?
Thanks! And sorry for not looking at the sticky.
#16
30 watts is going to be right on the line. With some amps it'll be more than enough but for metal, or a metal feel, you will want 50 watts. The reason is that metal needs preamp distortion and clean power amp. To get that you need to be able to turn your master down without loosing too much volume.
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#17
I have 250 euros. What do you suggest me? Tube amps aren't good for metal right?
#18
Quote by Amarant
We play hard rock music, but most of us listen to metal, so we have a metal feel to it, I guess. I play with clean too, but mostly distorted. The drummer does double bass sometimes and claims to be with a hard hit. He doesn't hold himself back, that's for sure.
So to take all your posts together: a 30 watt tube amp would do it?
Thanks! And sorry for not looking at the sticky.

Some will argue that a 30 watt tube amp will work there but I would get at least a 50, just to be on the safe side.
Quote by Amarant
Tube amps aren't good for metal right?

On the contrary, they can get a much thicker sound and can always be boosted if they need it.
#19
Boosted with an overdrive pedal... What if I want to switch to clean fast? Can I do it without stomping on too many pedals?