#1
Okay I'm a newcomer to the forums, when in reality i've been using this site for about 4 years. I've been having a few issues with my fairly new amp, recently, and I would really appreciate any help.

-When I first bought the amp, it was the most beautiful thing I had ever heard. It was absolutely flawless (Line 6 30-watt Spider III). Then I decided to start a band. When it came time for our first session, I was barely able to hear my guitar over the drummer, and yes, even the bass. So I decided to turn up the volume (by the way, I use the Insane channel). Bad idea. Instantly, the feedback came roaring out of the amp like needles being driven into my, and my band members' ears. I'm not sure if that's the amp or the guitar, but either way, I can't really play with my band unless we want bleeding ears. Can someone help me on how to fix this problem?

PS: I've tried standing very far from the amp itself, and it doesn't help at all.

-Yesterday was my most recent jam session involving pain and agony and it was also the last time I played the amp before about ten minutes ago. Now it's giving off a crackling sound everytime I strum a string. Please help
#2
turn the gain down. <--would be the nice answer, if you want the recommended response, read on.

the line 6 spider 3, is an ok solid state practice amp and is not meant to play at loud volumes. so your best bet would be to get rid of it and get a new amp
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#3
Thank you for your response, the only problem is the only guitar store nearby has really crappy amps, and the one I have is the best there at my budget.
#5
Hey man, i have the same amp and had the same problem!
First time that happened to me, it was the CABLE that was the main Problem.
2nd time it happened, it was the LENGTH of the cable... I was told by a Studio artist in my days that anything over 15 feet causes u to lose tone! Try these man! Hope i helped
Tough men wear pink, Gay men say tough men wear pink
#6
Thank you, but I actually did hear from other people that Spider III wasn't good for bands, more of a practice amp. But what amps would you recommend around $200?
Last edited by grybo101 at Jan 11, 2009,
#7
no, it's not your cables, it's that you have a solid state amp at a high volume with high gain=massive feedback.

How much would you spend on a new amp, and what kinds of music do you play?
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#8
A scratchy noise coming from the speaker when you play is most likely a bad driver (speaker). Not trying to be mean, but a lot of these cheap amps were never meant to be taken out of the bedroom or family room. I'd recommend buying a decent cab for it, or saving up and getting a better amp, or combo unit.
#9
Quote by Ghold125
no, it's not your cables, it's that you have a solid state amp at a high volume with high gain=massive feedback.

How much would you spend on a new amp, and what kinds of music do you play?



Being that I'm a teen with no job, my budget would be 2 or 300 dollars, 400 at max, if I can save that much up. I was planning on buying a new guitar though. And I play anything, from alternative to pop-alt to metal to thrasher.
#10
Quote by grybo101
Thank you, but I actually did hear from other people that Spider III wasn't good for bands, more of a practice amp. But what amps would you recommend around $200?



If you're playing in a band, you need something more reliable than a $200 amp. Would you race a Yugo at the Indy 500? Of course not. You'd show up with a decent entry. If you're serious about playing in a band and competing with the drummer and bassist, you need to be serious about your amp. Plan on spending several hundred. Might I recommend looking at used gear if your budget doesn't allow new?
#14
Quote by MattAnderson111
Would a noise gate help?



A lot of people tend to misunderstand the purpose of a noise gate. A noise gate is only effective when you're not playing. For example, let's say I have a noisy ol' Strat with single coils pups and you hear the buzz from my amp when I'm not playing. A noise gate can be set to mute the hum. Anything above that preset level, such as me plucking a string, comes through and gets amplified. While I'm plucking that string, the hum is still there and can be heard in the background. The noise gate is only effective when you're not playing.