#1
What are your opinions of adult neurogenesis in the dendate gyrus and subventricular zone?
#4
Quote by Jitensha
What are your opinions of adult neurogenesis in the dendate gyrus and subventricular zone?


What are YOUR opinions?

*runs*
I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes
Jimi Hendrix

"In paradise there are no walls"
#7
Quote by danny275
What are YOUR opinions?

*runs*


I think that it serves a long term function rather than a short term function, due to the lack of observable change caused by it in a short period of time.
#8
...what?

"Walks away slowly"
Eternity isn't long
If all you so is sleep
And forever is just a little while
If all you do is dream.




All Alone is All we Are
#9
Quote by boreamor
I think it's morally and socially wrong.

Oh, get over yourself and get past your ignorance, it has plenty of importance beyond that.
#10
Quote by Jitensha
What are your opinions of adult neurogenesis in the dendate gyrus and subventricular zone?


Although it might seem that psychology and philosophy are different, they actually have a lot in common. This similarity is due to the fact that psychology has evolved from philosophy and philosophy came to this world from the infinite human curiosity that usually results in questions like: Who am I? What’s the point of living? In this essay, I will explain psychology having as a main tool my knowledge of philosophy. I will demonstrate how Mead’s sociological theory of the self is inadequately understood if his notion of the “I” is not cast in existential terms. To make it clear for your understanding, I will first introduce the central existential concepts supported with quotes from McAdams, Ortega and Van Deurzen-Smith. Then, we’ll see the sociological theory explained with Mead’s and Shusterman’s central concepts. Finally, we’ll examine the key topic of this essay which consists of showing how Mead’s notion of the “I” can be explained in existential terms.

should I continue?
#12
Umm, what do you meen what is my oppinion on it? Isn't that just how certain brain cells used for learning and memory stop regenerating as you get older? (linked to alzheimers and similar things)

I could be wrong though. its been a while.

EDIT: wait.......was it the actual loss of cell regeneration, or was it the procedure to try and reverse it? Bahh, i can't remember now
Last edited by Tubyboulin at Jan 11, 2009,
#13
Quote by nalyd
Oh, get over yourself and get past your ignorance, it has plenty of importance beyond that.


Look at the statistics! Ever since it was introduced 30 years ago, many people have died! Are you telling me that todays society has a place for adult neurogenesis?!
#14
From an ethical side of things, it can be rather effective and efficient if used correctly, but morally... I have my doubts.


So anyone know what this guy is talking about yet?
#16
Quote by Jitensha
What are your opinions of adult neurogenesis in the dendate gyrus and subventricular zone?

Well, Adult born neurons appear to have a role in the regulation of stress. Malberg et al. (2000)[10] and Manev et al. (2001)[11] have linked neurogenesis to the beneficial actions of certain antidepressants, suggesting a connection between decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and depression. In a subsequent paper, Santarelli et al. (2003)[12] demonstrated that the behavioural effects of antidepressants in mice did not occur when neurogenesis was prevented with x-irradiation techniques. In fact, adult-born neurons are more excitable than older neurons due to a differential expression of GABA receptors. A plausible model therefore is that these neurons augment the role of the hippocampus in the negative feedback mechanism of the HPA-axis (physiological stress) and perhaps in inhibiting the amygdala (the region of brain responsible for fearful responses to stimuli). This is consistent with numerous findings linking stress-relieving activities (learning, exposure to a new yet benign environment, and exercise) to increased levels of neurogenesis, as well as the observation that animals exposed to physiological stress (cortisol) or psychological stress (e.g. isolation) show markedly decreased levels of adult-born neurons.

Papers have hypothesized that learning and memory are linked with depression, and have suggested that neurogenesis may promote neuroplasticity. Castren (2005)[13], for instance, has proposed that our mood may be regulated, at a base level, by plasticity, and thus not chemistry. The effects of antidepressant treatment are only secondary to this.

*hopes nobody ventures to wikipedia*
#19
Quote by Tubyboulin
Umm, what do you meen what is my oppinion on it? Isn't that just how certain brain cells used for learning and memory stop regenerating as you get older? (linked to alzheimers and similar things)

I could be wrong though. its been a while.


I'd guess no because the word 'neurogenesis' doesn't imply anything stopping, but rather something forming or being created, most likely neurons? no idea.
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#20
Quote by russian_shreder
Although it might seem that psychology and philosophy are different, they actually have a lot in common. This similarity is due to the fact that psychology has evolved from philosophy and philosophy came to this world from the infinite human curiosity that usually results in questions like: Who am I? What’s the point of living? In this essay, I will explain psychology having as a main tool my knowledge of philosophy. I will demonstrate how Mead’s sociological theory of the self is inadequately understood if his notion of the “I” is not cast in existential terms. To make it clear for your understanding, I will first introduce the central existential concepts supported with quotes from McAdams, Ortega and Van Deurzen-Smith. Then, we’ll see the sociological theory explained with Mead’s and Shusterman’s central concepts. Finally, we’ll examine the key topic of this essay which consists of showing how Mead’s notion of the “I” can be explained in existential terms.

should I continue?


Psychology is based on the scientific method. Philosophy is thinking about **** essentially.
#21
Quote by boreamor
Look at the statistics! Ever since it was introduced 30 years ago, many people have died! Are you telling me that todays society has a place for adult neurogenesis?!

Pft, but the potential it has in the future far exceeds that. Even what it has done so far is worth it. You take it for granted, but so much in your life depends on having that place for adult neurogenesis.
#23
I feel cheese tastes better when expressed in laments terms.
there is no quote in this box
#27
it would be pretty much perfect. In a perfect world.
Cette nuit j'ai rêvé que je mâchais ses yeux
Après avoir crevé par accès de furie
Ta replète panse d'helminthes blancs nourrie,
Trop prompte à déféquer le fruit d'un vit sanieux.
#28
Yes.
In diesem Herz hab ich die Macht.

Gear:
Fender MIM HSS Strat (Wine Red)
VOX Valvetronix VT20+
Kay K390 Acoustic
#30
Quote by Jitensha
Who would have ever thought that there are so many geniuses like me here?

And so much modesty in The Pit too
#31
Quote by Jitensha
Who would have ever thought that there are so many geniuses like me here?

I just think you're a twat.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#32
Neural cells do not regenerate, once brain cells are damaged, they stay that way forever. I don't see how all this "research" on the areas where neurogenesis is apparent is legit. Apparently they're also discovering the processes that can promote or inhibit neurogenesis, which would pretty much be a medical f-cking phenomenon o_o
#33
Using the basic structural formula of the cerebral cortex (outlined mainly in the 4th Edition of Neurological sciences University release), I am most intrigued by the corelation between the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the lateral ventricles, where the new cells migrate to the olfactory bulb via the rostral migratory stream and the subgranular zone (SGZ), part of the dentate gyrus of hippocampus.

Although many of these newborn cells die shortly after their birth, I believe that a permanent genetic reconstruction plan helps regenerate while a number of them become functionally integrated into the surrounding brain tissue.
#34
Quote by MandoDrew
Neural cells do not regenerate, once brain cells are damaged, they stay that way forever. I don't see how all this "research" on the areas where neurogenesis is apparent is legit. Apparently they're also discovering the processes that can promote or inhibit neurogenesis, which would pretty much be a medical f-cking phenomenon o_o


You need to read a few recent research papers. I'll give you a link to what pretty much proved the first existence of neurogenesis in humans.

Here's the full text version. I really suggest that you read it. http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v4/n11/full/nm1198_1313.html
#36
Quote by Jitensha
What are your opinions of adult neurogenesis in the dendate gyrus and subventricular zone?


I couldv told u that
#37
I think it's awful, the worst thing to happen to this country since the meksikans.
#38
Is this about benjamin button?
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
With boys it's like "here's an incredibly complex sport to learn with sophisticated rules and various interdependent roles to play in a social unit."

For girls it's like "here's Barbie...you're fat!"