#1
Can a D-tuna be used on a original Floyd rose tremolo system, or will it just send everything out of tune?
#2
Yes it will fit... and well, it's designed to change the tuning.
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#3
it has to be blocked first
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#5
The D-tuna is made for the floyd rose and systems similar to it. Go ahead and put it on. It will work.
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#6
Its designed for an OFR like stated before but if your bridge is set up to float, it'll have the same effect as if you drop the E to D yourself meaning all the other strings will go sharp cause the bridge will drop. Block the bridge first, or use a Tremel-no or install it on a guitar that has a flush mounted Floyd and it'll be fine.
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#7
Quote by DSOTM80
Its designed for an OFR like stated before but if your bridge is set up to float, it'll have the same effect as if you drop the E to D yourself meaning all the other strings will go sharp cause the bridge will drop. Block the bridge first, or use a Tremel-no or install it on a guitar that has a flush mounted Floyd and it'll be fine.


uhm, isnt that the entire point of the d-tuna

to drop your low E string to D without rebalancing the bridge
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#8
Quote by angl2k
uhm, isnt that the entire point of the d-tuna

to drop your low E string to D without rebalancing the bridge

no, the point is to go instantly between E and D.

if your trem floats you'll need to rebalance it. it's good but but it still can't ignore physics.
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#9
Don't waste your time on a d-Tuna. Get a tremol-no, that way you don't actually have to block your trem and you can set it to hardtail/dive only and still drop tune it.
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#10
Quote by Sleazeball
Don't waste your time on a d-Tuna. Get a tremol-no, that way you don't actually have to block your trem and you can set it to hardtail/dive only and still drop tune it.


A Tremel-no blocks your trem for hardtail and dive only All a D-Tuna does is drop your low E to D, thats it. I don't get why some people think its this magic product. If you got a floating trem you'll need something like a Tremel-no to be able to use a D-Tuna!
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#11
Quote by DSOTM80
Its designed for an OFR like stated before but if your bridge is set up to float, it'll have the same effect as if you drop the E to D yourself meaning all the other strings will go sharp cause the bridge will drop. Block the bridge first, or use a Tremel-no or install it on a guitar that has a flush mounted Floyd and it'll be fine.

would the other strings go so sharp that you wouldn't be able to correct it with the fine tuning knobs?
#12
I'll also point out that the D-tuna would block your trem from very much pull-up, if any, if it's floating. If you have a stable/dive-only trem (top-mounted/non-flushed or have a tremol-no installed), then it will work properly. Otherwise the bridge will pull back and make the other strings go sharp which defeats the whole purpose of the product, really.
#13
Quote by SlappyMcLardfat
would the other strings go so sharp that you wouldn't be able to correct it with the fine tuning knobs?


Ok its simple. The D-Tuna is designed to quickly changed your low E to D and back again. If you had to use your fine tuners afterwards it defeats its purpose, this is why you can't use it when your Floyd is floating because the loss of tension on your low E will cause the bridge to dip and like you said make the other strings go sharp.

Now, if your Floyd is set up like this...


then you don't have to worry about anything and the D-Tuna works without any worries. However, if your Floyd floats you'll first need to somehow 'block' the Floyd and turn it into either dive only or hard tail before engaging the D-Tuna, which is where you'd also need to get something like a Tremel-no. Clears it all up?
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
Last edited by DSOTM80 at Jan 20, 2009,