#1
Alright so, I love playing guitar, but I figure since my band switches around a lot and our bassist is really iffy, I'm wondering if it'd be easier for me to instead be the rhythm guitarist to become the bassist. Would that be a good idea to try?I've been playing guitar for about a little over a year, (I'm not bad for a rhythm guitarist).

And if I started playing bass, where should I start?(I already have a bass from way back when by the way) What songs should I learn, should I worry about writing my own bass...things (need help with the name)? I played my bass about 5 weeks and then I quit because it almost knocked me out so I quit.

Any help is appreciated :]
#2
Quote by SGlover69
Alright so, I love playing guitar, but I figure since my band switches around a lot and our bassist is really iffy, I'm wondering if it'd be easier for me to instead be the rhythm guitarist to become the bassist. Would that be a good idea to try?I've been playing guitar for about a little over a year, (I'm not bad for a rhythm guitarist).

And if I started playing bass, where should I start?(I already have a bass from way back when by the way) What songs should I learn, should I worry about writing my own bass...things (need help with the name)? I played my bass about 5 weeks and then I quit because it almost knocked me out so I quit.

Any help is appreciated :]


Well regarding as to what music you want to start at, it depends on what music you enjoy or more importantly what music your band plays. I suggest looking at the the "bass songs to learn" sticky and the other FAQs on the top for that matter as well. They should help you a bit.
#3
Quote by cjlane
Well regarding as to what music you want to start at, it depends on what music you enjoy or more importantly what music your band plays. I suggest looking at the the "bass songs to learn" sticky and the other FAQs on the top for that matter as well. They should help you a bit.


Ah crud your right. My mistake sorry about that. My band generally plays led zeppelin, Aerosmith, Pink Floyd, basically classic/modern rock
#4
Every now and then I have to play sit-in bass with other bands. I love it. It's a nice change from guitar, partly because all the bass songs I play are so easy. But I wouldn't become a bassist full-time, though.
When life gives you lemons, squirt juice in your enemies' eyes.
#5
well, bass is a different instrument.

you get to play much more interesting things than rhythm guitarists, but at a price. you will never get away with bad timing. you need to groove, interact with the drummer.
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#6
Well see, it'd also help me me keep the timing going. Usually I have good timing but there's the off times where I'm VERY off. and the times I never get off (on guitar that is)

I think what i'll do is self teach myself bass. If i just went through song after song it'd help me out?
#7
Quote by SGlover69
Ah crud your right. My mistake sorry about that. My band generally plays led zeppelin, Aerosmith, Pink Floyd, basically classic/modern rock


Ah, I don't have playing experience with Aerosmith or Pink Floyd. But some good Zeppelin tunes to learn are Dazed and Confused, Good Times Bad Times and Communication Breakdown, good beginner songs. Also, since you mention classic rock, not too sure if you're a Beatles fan, but if you are, Come Together, Daytripper, Oh Darling and Taxman are some good tunes to learn too.

Edit: About your timing concern, play some of those tunes or ones that you choose to play and just take a close listen to the drum and bass, you'll notice that there's a pattern going on between them and that they're both locked in.
Last edited by cjlane at Jan 11, 2009,
#8
Quote by SGlover69
Well see, it'd also help me me keep the timing going. Usually I have good timing but there's the off times where I'm VERY off. and the times I never get off (on guitar that is)

I think what i'll do is self teach myself bass. If i just went through song after song it'd help me out?

yes.

theory is also very good to learn- you will want to know how to play scales in order to be as groovy as possible.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#9
Yeah if the bass is off, the next 5-10 (or even more) seconds will be spent for the band to lock back in. The bass supports the drummer just as much as the other way around. And if they fall out of sync, the bottom falls out (no pun intended) from under the song. And if the drummer falls out of sync because of you, the rest of the song will be a mess.

So if you do decide to play bass, make sure that you can play the songs. Led Z can be difficult for a newer bassist (and quite a few of the more experienced ones), so your band may need to cut some of those out. But nothing feels better than the groove you get into in PF's Money.

So try the bass, but only if you want to, not because the bassist has inconsistant attendance. It can be amazingly rewarding.

Edit: And triads are going to be your best friend too.
Last edited by blue_dragonzero at Jan 11, 2009,
#10
Thank you guys =D

Think it'd be easier to go from guitar to bass instead of just starting out on bass?(i mean besides the obvious coordination between hands)

EDIT: To be quite honest, I've always wanted to play bass, but like everyone who has never touched an instrument before, i thought bass was just so easy that there was no real point in trying.

Stupid me lol, now that i realize how hard it is to play it, It makes me wanna try it

and should I do the plucking or use a pick?cause i get crap usally when i do
Last edited by SGlover69 at Jan 11, 2009,
#11
Quote by blue_dragonzero
Yeah if the bass is off, the next 5-10 (or even more) seconds will be spent for the band to lock back in. The bass supports the drummer just as much as the other way around. And if they fall out of sync, the bottom falls out (no pun intended) from under the song. And if the drummer falls out of sync because of you, the rest of the song will be a mess.

So if you do decide to play bass, make sure that you can play the songs. Led Z can be difficult for a newer bassist (and quite a few of the more experienced ones), so your band may need to cut some of those out. But nothing feels better than the groove you get into in PF's Money.

So try the bass, but only if you want to, not because the bassist has inconsistant attendance. It can be amazingly rewarding.

How Many More Times is pretty simple, great for passing out band fliers mid song and guitar improvising as well.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#12
Bass is a very under-rated instrument. Most people tend to shy away from it because they say it "isn't much fun" or is "too easy". Bass is the same thing as playing drums in my opinion. Bass is the backbone of a song, whether it be through a bass guitar, or the drums. The bassist is the person the rest of the band follows, whether they want to admit it or not. Bass is only as difficult or as fun as you make it. You can play simply, or go into extreme intricacy. You have to decide what kind of challenge you're willing to give yourself. Guitar to bass transfer is rather easy because you already have the basics. So really, take into consideration what you think could work for you.
#13
Well, if you haven't played a piano or string instrument, bass could be difficult. Insufficient strength to pluck could be an issue, unless you work out (or fap) a lot due to the muscle not being the most used in the arm. Hand cramps and other problems as well could cause probs. Also fingers would be in PAIN due to the large finger spread, espicially if spider walking.

Playing guitar probably does help with those (debatably Guitar Hero too, because that's where my plucking muscles came from).

And by difficult I meant Black Dog, Immigrant Song etc.
Last edited by blue_dragonzero at Jan 11, 2009,
#14
Quote by SGlover69
Thank you guys =D

Think it'd be easier to go from guitar to bass instead of just starting out on bass?(i mean besides the obvious coordination between hands)

EDIT: To be quite honest, I've always wanted to play bass, but like everyone who has never touched an instrument before, i thought bass was just so easy that there was no real point in trying.

Stupid me lol, now that i realize how hard it is to play it, It makes me wanna try it

and should I do the plucking or use a pick?cause i get crap usally when i do


Well, going from guitar to bass will probably be easier than going bass to guitar like me (damn I suck at playing chords, lol) you may have a little trouble fretting and may have to learn to play in positions on the bottom of the fretboard if 1 finger per fret is too much of a stretch for you, but it shouldn't be too difficult. I'm like you, except I've always played bass and just recently bought a guitar, pretty fun . But as to whether you're going to finger play or use a pick it depends on the tone you're looking for, but you do worry me by saying "pluck" as bass player's don't pluck the strings, they roll their fingers over the top of the string, plucking is part of the slap and pop technique. Hope I've been of help
#15
Well back when I played it was plucking which was just light plucks, but when I use my fingers NOW i get the rolling your fingers over it thing

Edit: Thank you guys, all of you I really appreciate it :]
#16
just throwing this out there

dont use the guitar amp with your bass
GEAR
Fender American Jazz Standard Bass
EHX Russian Big Muff
Boss SYB-5 synth
Peavy Max 700 Bass Amp w/ Peavy Pro 410 Bass Cab
Ampeg BA-115T

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#17
Sometimes I play in a style in which I will occaisionally switch between rolling and plucking. Plucking can place accents in a piece and add a sort of staccato to a piece. Plucking accentuates a piece heavily, however, so if you want to blend in, rolling is most likely the best alternative. If you want to pluck certain things then go for it. But I am obliged to mention the damage to frets/board using this or slap and pop, but it is slow enough that you will either quit bass or buy a new one far beyond it becomes heavily detrimental. I would say it takes 7+ years probably, unless you pluck or pop all of the time.
#18
As Humanity has stated--timing is everything. I went from being a rhythm guitarist to bassist and its still the one thing that tend tend to get me at times. Make sure everytime you practice alone, its with a drum track, a click track or a metronome. You need to build that internal click. Also take some time to just jam with your drummer alone to build that lock as a rhythm section.

Focus on your hand positions as well. Make sure when you are playing fingerstyle your plucking hand is perpendicular to the strings and slightly cupped. Your fretting hand should have the thumb behind the neck as a pivot.

Music suggestions? God Floyd is a gold mind for a new bass player. Zeppelin--not so much, since JPJ was a real monster on bass (Just listen to something like Lemon Song or What Is and What Should Never Be). "How Many more times" is good for locking a groove though.
#19
Quote by SGlover69

Think it'd be easier to go from guitar to bass instead of just starting out on bass?(i mean besides the obvious coordination between hands)


I think what you need to do is stop comparing the two instruments. While yes they both look similar, it is important to get out of the mind set of a bass as a guitar with bigger strings, otherwise you'll end up playing the bass like a guitar, and that, is not a good thing.
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#20
If you already play guitar it is very easy t switch to bass, i played guitar for a year and then our band never could find a bass player and i always wanted to try bass, so i pretty much switch and I enjoy bass as much as guitar, i'd say go for it, and bass is kinda a mix b/t rhythm and lead guitar u could say, just with a bigger neck, thicker strings, usually one string at a time and different strumming techniques
#21
Keep in mind that the bass is not a super sized geetar. They are totally different. Totally. Timing is everything, and theory is your musical friend in bass. You need to also learn that internal click of a metronome, that is one of the most important things.

Good luck on your musical career, and remember to fret like a bassist, not a guitarist. 1 Finger per fret!!! Not 2 or 3 like my stupid guitarist.
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