#1
So.
I know music theory. I know how to build scales, how to harmonize.
I've played the keyboards.
The thing is.. I don't know how to apply this theory to the guitar.
For example building a major scale on the guitar... like the C Major scale.. I know the notes of the scale but I don't know how to build it on the guitar ..
There are a lot of C's and G's and D's on the guitar, I just don't know where to start, where to continue and where to end...
Does anyone know of a website that could have like all this theory mapped out on a fretboard??

Thanks in advance!
#2
you tune your guitar to whatever and everyfret from there is a halfstep.
Example 1st string E then 1st fret is F 2nd fret is F#.
#3
There are a lot of C's and G's and D's on the guitar, I just don't know where to start, where to continue and where to end...


Wherever you want. Scales are collections of notes, not patterns on a fretboard. Use the notes in the scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
I'd have a look at the lessons section here on UG, there is some really gfreat stuff there.

First thing you need to remember is that a fret on a guitar represents one semitone, so if you follow one string you reach the octave on the 12th fret.

Secondly most guitarists play scales vertically, i.e. low E to high E, althouhg you can opbvisouly play them horizontally along the one string as well, or even diagonally, really a 3d instrument!

Typicaly guitar scales are played with between two and three notes per string, with five differnt "positions" along the neck, which repeat at the 12th fret.

For a c maj scale for eg, if you wanted to start on the Low E (technicaly that actually makes it an E Phrygian mode), you would play E F an G on the low E string, A B and C on the A string etc.

Hope that helps.
#6
Quote by Slavemaster1120
I see...
So I just memorize where each note is on the fretboard?


I strongly suggest doing so, yes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/lessons/lesson4.htm

heres a nice little site i googled up for you.

a little advice would be to memorize the notes on the frets from open to 12th, everything past that just repeats on the string.

so if you wanted to do a simple C major

e
B
G 2(A) 4)B) 5(C)
D 2(E) 3(F) 5(G)
A 3(C) 5(D)
E

it would be something like that, and you can also do it starting on the 15th fret.
Also memorize the notes of simple chords and build upon that.

a C power chord would contain a Root, Fifth and Octave.

e
B
G C [octave]
D G [Fifth]
A C [Octave]
E

It's good that you're taking music theory, I'm taking a class as well in my high school and it's helped me greatly as a guitar player.

I hope this has helped you, good luck with your playing!
#10
Quote by HendrixClaptonP
I'd have a look at the lessons section here on UG, there is some really gfreat stuff there.

First thing you need to remember is that a fret on a guitar represents one semitone, so if you follow one string you reach the octave on the 12th fret.

Secondly most guitarists play scales vertically, i.e. low E to high E, althouhg you can opbvisouly play them horizontally along the one string as well, or even diagonally, really a 3d instrument!

Typicaly guitar scales are played with between two and three notes per string, with five differnt "positions" along the neck, which repeat at the 12th fret.

For a c maj scale for eg, if you wanted to start on the Low E (technicaly that actually makes it an E Phrygian mode), you would play E F an G on the low E string, A B and C on the A string etc.

Hope that helps.


Does it makes any difference if I like play ...
On the low e .. 3rd(G), 5th(A) 7th(B) fret then on the A .. 3(C),5(D),7(E) .. then on the B .. 3,(F) 5,(G) 7(A) .... and so on till the 6 strings are covered??
does the order on which the notes are played matters at all?
or as long as I cover the notes that are on the scale??
so ..
if I would like to solo over a progression in C Major..
Id use all of this frets (and any other note on the C major scale on the guitar, no matter the fret)
right ?
#11
yup, thats about it.

There are 'official' positions too, starting the scale in different places on the fretboard.

And if you haven't already, learn the pentatonic minor scale - its basically a minor scale with the 3rd and 6th notes missed out, but its great for soloing
#12
Sooo...
Its exactly the same as on keyboards..
except that I just dont really have the notes " infront of me " ....
guess I should start to try and memorize them hehehe
thanks !!
#13
easier than on a keyboard - once you can play C major in one position, all you have to do to play C# major is move it up a fret

So you only have to learn one of each type of scale, then you just move it around the keyboard. You hardly even need to know the key sig
#14
How about .. for example...
I know the pentatonic minor... one position ..
But I mean... how can I just be "stuck" soloing in that position ... how do I know how to move around the whole neck on that same key and scale?
#15
1. Learn chords C, A, G, E, and D
2. Learn the scale patterns for each of those
3. Take a look at the pattern and how it repeats on the neck.

For instance, say you are playing your favorite song, and the key is C. You can play it with the C chord and the C scale. Or, you can move it down a bit to the third fret and play it in the A pattern. Even though you are using an A pattern, it's still C. Move on down to the fifth fret and play it in G. Again, G "shape", but the notes are still C. Down further still, E scale, then D, then you reach the twelfth fret and the pattern starts over, as there are only twelve semitones.

That's the "CAGED system". Its not a name of a technique, its an acronym for the scale patterns for a guitar in standard tuning. You can start and end your scales wherever you wish, just like in piano, but memorizing the chord shapes and the scales for those five will rapidly improve your pace at learning.

You can pick up a cardboard slide at a music store for a few dollars that has those patterns drawn out for you.
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#16
Quote by Slavemaster1120
How about .. for example...
I know the pentatonic minor... one position ..
But I mean... how can I just be "stuck" soloing in that position ... how do I know how to move around the whole neck on that same key and scale?



You learn it in its five forms or shapes, then memorize the shape above it and one below it. That way you have somewhere to go once you get bored. You can stay in one shape and solo for as long as you desire, be sure though to use different techniques so as to make it interesting for yourself and perhaps a would be listener. Like your pitch wheel, where u simulate vibrato and bends... now you can experience it for real.

hope this helps