#1
I read some stuff about tuning ratio's and I began to think.

I like 1 key more then the other. Do you think this is because Subconciously I heard alot of songs in a particular key, or maybe something else?

I like to play F#m and Bm and C#m a lot. It's not muscle memory, cause on a piano I tend to play in F# minor as well.

I also noticed how closely related they are. It's weird.

Maybe it's because I like the timbre of those keys played on a guitar?

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 12, 2009,
#2
Strangely, I like those keys as well. And for major, I actually like the relative majors. I believe it's the tone of the sound - notice how if you end a riff on a B note, feedback comes much quicker than on, say, and Eb. Perhaps it's this strong sound that we like?
#3
I focus on purposly writing songs in different keys, alot of the bands who write stuff in just a few keys start sounding simular on every song.

I don't know why you like certain keys more, maybe you're just more used to playing in those keys.. or you might actually like the way they sound more than others, i think you're the only one who can answer that

I think everyone has atleast a small level of key preferance
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Jan 12, 2009,
#5
Meh, i don't really believe thats the case. It's propably just a case of you being more comfortable playing in those keys
#7
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
Meh, i don't really believe thats the case. It's propably just a case of you being more comfortable playing in those keys


I can play any stuff in any key everywhere on the neck, It's certainly not that.

I liked what michal said; Some keys produce harmonic richer notes on a guitar then others.

Peacefull rocker. I think that's not true of writing in different keys. I mean, what if you write 24 songs using each key twice, and ur 2 best songs are in the same key.

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#8
There are a multitude of theories about pitches having different inate "colours", but I'm not convinced by any of them, given that there are other more realistic reasons for keys sounding different.

On a piano, you naturally hit white and black notes slightly differently. This gives a key like C major (root, third and fifth all white) a slightly different feel to Ab major (root and fifth black, third white) for instance. I've noticed a mild preference in piano music towards keys such as the latter example, with the root and fifth on a black note while the third is on a white note. Perhaps this gives a mild boost towards the third, making Ab major "more" major than C major, and C# minor (another common piano key) slightly "more" minor than say D minor. I might just have picked out an irregular bunch of songs to learn, but those two keys in particular, that is Ab major and C# minor, are the most common by quite a way among my repetoire. It could be a coincidence though.

On the guitar, you get subtle differences in notes that resonate with an open string. There was a famous spanish (?) guitarist that made a big deal out of this, and designed a new guitar with like 4 (?) extra bass strings to make it "more balanced". In the above examples, you'd have the third in a C#m chord resonating with the open E string, so you never know, there might be something to it.

I'd most believe it was simply a preference for what the player is used to (and hence most comfortable playing), but failing that, I'd go for mechanical differences for the instrument in question before I'd believe in innate psychological differences relating to pitch.
#9
Quote by one vision
^On a physical level? Or a mental level?

Because I think everone can get acquainted with a key, ie learn it well.

Ofcourse, im only suggesting maybe hes played in these keys and feels more comfortable with them

either way, he says he can play everywhere on the fretboard, i can aswell. Theres still keys I seem to use more often or prefer, i don't really think different keys have different moods or flavours, just different pitch.
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Jan 12, 2009,
#10
If our hearing was as developed as our sight, we'd be able to distinguish between different pitches as easily as we would between colours. And since we find some colours more aesthetically pleasing than others, perhaps we feel something similar about pitch but on a minuscule scale?
#11
i suppose.. but look at the songs you like to listen to then, not just your own work.

if this was true, your favourite tracks by other artists would all seem to be in the same keys you prefer to write your own music in
#12
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
i suppose.. but look at the songs you like to listen to then, not just your own work.

if this was true, your favourite tracks by other artists would all seem to be in the same keys you prefer to write your own music in


I like alot of tracks that are Eb.

I noticed this cause when I started out playing guitar, almost every song I Wanted to play was half step down. (van halen songs, Jimi hendrix songs, Gn'r) and I was annoyed by it, cause I was also learning theory, and I didn't wanna tune my guitar up and down 10 times a day.

I also liked Eb better then E. Maybe The guitar's timbre is better when the tension is more loose, I don't know. E is "too bright" imo.

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#13
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
I focus on purposly writing songs in different keys, alot of the bands who write stuff in just a few keys start sounding simular on every song.

I don't know why you like certain keys more, maybe you're just more used to playing in those keys.. or you might actually like the way they sound more than others, i think you're the only one who can answer that

I think everyone has atleast a small level of key preferance


In my band we would definitely use different keys, but you have to suit your singer as well. So we like using between low G - C so we can get a decent low vocal note. Yes, we are pretty bad singers. Instrumentals, anything goes. Jam sessions vary but tend to be in E, A or D for any reason or another.
#15
I'd rather listen to 3 stylistically different songs in D minor than 3 similar songs in different key signatures. I think you are over stressing the importance of playing in different keys.
#16
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
Yeah, and thats what makes alot of bands sound the same all the time


A Great portion of The Beatles studio works are either in E Major or G Major,but I dare you to tell any significant similarities in their songs because of recurring key signatures.
#17
Yea, if you have a guitar player playing more than one or two songs in like E or A, or any key where you have a lot of open strings ringing, after a while you start to just hear those strings droning. It can sound very beautiful, a lot of beautiful chords utilize the open strings. After a while it starts to sound boring, to me at least.

So if I play a piece in A I might try to play the next piece in Ab or Eb, or something.
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#19
The beatles mix up their keys, they hardly stick to E and G major.

im not saying playing in a different key will make a riff sound completly different, because it won't. Theres other things that come into play when making original music. I was more aiming at bands like Creed, or Sound Garden, or even Tool who stick to the same key all the time.. i think their lack of key change is a big part of that