#1
Okay, so this saturday, my band is going into the studio for the first time to record/mix 4 songs. We're well practiced, and we (our band is a power trio BTW, bass, drums, guitar+singer) can play our songs straight through with no problems 95% of the time. Anyways, is there any tips for working in the studio?

Just like, general ones, I'd just like to hear some stuff from studio-vets because I'm slightly nervous.
#2
Definitely don't be nervous. When recording vocals, try to also use your stage presence since it usually makes you sound more into the music.
#3
people crack under the pressure of recording sometimes, when my band recorded our whole EP i went in there with this mentality:

We Wrote the goddamned songs, of course they are gonan be easy to play.
#4
Bring something to do. You're going to be there for a while, so unless its a big studio with a T.V or pool table, you are going to need something to do. Bring a book or gameboy or something.

Don't watch your band members record, unless they want you to. I usually feel under more pressure when someone is watching me and I tend to mess up more.

Don't be there when the engineer is mixing. The last thing he needs is teenagers telling him how to properly mix a bass drum. Let him do it all, listen to the mixings, and tell him if he needs to change any area's after.

Change your strings two days in advanced to let them streach out but still stay in tune. Make sure the drummer has new skins and they are in tune.

Tune inbetween every song. And don't just say, "Awe, close enough". Make sure it is bang on. And tune every string, even the ones you know you arn't going to be using.

Singer, make sure you drink lots of water the night before and the morning you are recording, and always have water bottles on you. Do drink any caffinated drinks like coffee or coke, and stay as far away from milk as you can. Try not to wear out your voice by talking less the days before recording.

Make sure you sit when you are playing. You can reach the strings easier.

It's cliche, but have fun. That's what being in a band is all about, right?


I took some of those from Chris, but that should help a bit.
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#5
Oh, and don't settle for a mediocre performance. If there is one part with a messed up rhythm or dynamic or whatever, redo it or else you will regret it 3 weeks down the road.
#6
Quote by MadAudioMan
can play our songs straight through with no problems 95% of the time.



be able to play through no problems 100% of the time.
#7
the drummer in my old band couldn't play as tight to a metronome as he thought, we found this out IN the studio, called a session drummer to lay down the tracks

hopefully that wont be an issue, good luck
#8
Each of you need to practice seperately with a metronome, even if you aren't using a click track. There is no reason not to play in perfect time.
#9
Make sure you can play to a metronome (especially the drummer), bring money for food so you can take a break for lunch or something, and bring something to keep yourself occupied while not recording.
#10
Yeah, we're planning for the drummer and guitarist to leave for lunch while I lay down some rhythm guitar and a few layers on a classical piece I wrote, so they'll be able to get out of the studio for alittle.

Also, good call on bringing a book, its a small studio without a TV or anything, so that'll help. Also, we can play along with a metronome very good, we typically play with one in our practices.

So... Looks like I'm more prepared then it would seem. Also, I'll make sure I don't argue with the mixer, as someone said.
#11
Record the vox live. A lotta people don't like to do this, but it really helps with the energy in the song. It's a little risky, if you care about things bleeding over, but I love doing it.

And have fun.
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#12
-Play sitting down

-Rest your vocals before during and after tracking them (no talking unless necessary, trust me)

-Never ever settle for sub par performance. When you track something perfectly, track it again perfectly. If you have 2 or 3 perfect tracks then you can move on, but never settle.

-Drink lots of water and get lots of sleep. Studio work can be long, and tiring.

-Its already been said, but tune tune tune tune tune tune. I cant stress that enough. Tune in between every take, every pause, every track every time. You may not think anyone can hear it, but they can.

-Don't get too attached to your parts. The producers job is to spur you to creativity so leave no creative stone unturned. Parts change, you add things, you take away things, its just how it is. That said, knowing the songs inside and out will save you money.
#13
Quote by Roxor_Mc0wnage
-Play sitting down

-Rest your vocals before during and after tracking them (no talking unless necessary, trust me)

-Never ever settle for sub par performance. When you track something perfectly, track it again perfectly. If you have 2 or 3 perfect tracks then you can move on, but never settle.

-Drink lots of water and get lots of sleep. Studio work can be long, and tiring.

-Its already been said, but tune tune tune tune tune tune. I cant stress that enough. Tune in between every take, every pause, every track every time. You may not think anyone can hear it, but they can.

-Don't get too attached to your parts. The producers job is to spur you to creativity so leave no creative stone unturned. Parts change, you add things, you take away things, its just how it is. That said, knowing the songs inside and out will save you money.

Not necesserily(sp?). A song you can play well sitting down, might suffer when you stand up and play it live, like Satch's "crushing day". He has to sit down onstage to play that live because of this. IMO, play in a position that is not sitting down (unless you know you can play it standing) but play in a comfortable position.
#14
Quote by Roxor_Mc0wnage
-Play sitting down


Not always, when playing bass I usually sit to play a solo or something that requires a lot of accuracy in the left hand, I stand with the strap real loose if I want to play something crazy fast without wearing out my right hand.

But I do sit most of the time.
#15
Lots of great advice in this thread. Here is a page I did up for my home studio to address this very topic.

http://greenroomrecording.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=19&Itemid=35
...note the three sub-tabs too.

Also worth considering:
http://greenroomrecording.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=32&Itemid=48

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Dude's I wasn't saying FORCE yourself to sit down. Simply that it is easier to reach and play smoother most of the time when you do. The main thing is to be comfortable like MoleMania said. Our bass player tracks standing up and he dances around while doing it because he is comfortable doing that and it helps his playing intensity. So do what you want to do; sitting down was just a suggestion to help improve ease of playing and lessen strain on your neck, back, lowerback, shoulders, and arms from several long days of tracking.