#2
What's the context?
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#5
Quote by pepsi1187
E minor most likely

an Em is an E Minor not major chord


An upper case M is frequently used to represent a major chord.

TS: Without knowing the overall context, it's hard to be too specific. I would likely approach it by emphasizing chord tones.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
what scale would you use over a EM6/9-FM11b9 chord progression? E major and Fmajor


Emphasize the chord tones. Not everything is as simple as "pick a scale".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
they are Emajor6/9-Fmajor11b9 sorry


I know that.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
im still new to music theory. what do you mean?
[Edit]
or what would you play over that chord progression, giving the first chord used in that rock like progression is EMajor
Last edited by AndrewSchaeffer at Jan 13, 2009,
#11
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
im still new to music theory. what do you mean?
[Edit]
or what would you play over that chord progression, giving the first chord used in that rock like progression is EMajor


I already told you: Emphasize the chord tones. Running through a scale over a progression like this is going to sound terrible unless you know exactly what you're doing.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by BeerChurch
E Lydian


What in that progression suggests E lydian.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Archeo means with following the chord, play the (extension) notes in the chord

The more chord tones (and the more obscure ones) you use in a chord, the less note choice you have. The chords are already outlined by those extensions, thus any scale will have more "Wrong" notes then "right" notes.

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#17
Quote by BeerChurch
Bb


That doesn't suggest lydian. There are also a large number of notes incompatible with E lydian.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by BeerChurch
Only two - F & C


The (alleged) tonic chord contains nothing to suggest lydian, and the other contains a single note that sort of might possibly suggest lydian were the context completely different, as well as a number of notes foreign to the mode.

There is nothing lydian about those chords.
By the way, E lydian contains an A#, not a Bb. No, they are not the same thing.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jan 13, 2009,
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
An upper case M is frequently used to represent a major chord.

TS: Without knowing the overall context, it's hard to be too specific. I would likely approach it by emphasizing chord tones.



We agree at last
#21
If you want to think of it in terms of scales - just play the Emajor scale over the E chord and the F major scale over the Fmajor chord (but leave out the G)
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#22
EDIT;

Omg; you probably mean E6/9 and FM11b9?

not E6/9- and FM11b9

It's a weird progression, sometimes I wonder what goes on in people's heads..

Can't you tab the chords out how you play em?


TS why do you have an F in ur first chord and not an F# or a G?

It's to dissonant, and if you want to imply F over E so badly, then it's only logical to play An F note over that chord,

It's a b2, which is almost never used in relation to E Major, because over an E chord it will sound if ur in the wrong key, cause ur a half step apart, and the tension to the E is sooooo big.

b2 is used in totally different contexts (mostly in relation to minor and dominant chords (or) as a passing tone)

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 13, 2009,
#23
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
what scale?

Are you sure its a maj11 type chord? It's just that major 11's are not very common cuz of the semitone between the 3rd and 4th (11th).

Anyway, the progression isn't diatonic, so it's best to pick the chord tones when soloing/improvising.
#25
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
what scale?

If you want to use just one scale over both chords, I suggest making the E chord a minor tonality, and the F chord a major tonality. You can then use E Phrygian over both.

Other scales to use are E, A and D Minor Pentatonic.

Be careful with the higher chord extensions though, making sure they lie within the scale.
Last edited by mdc at Jan 13, 2009,
#26
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
what scale?



What is this chord progression from? something you made up or an actual song?

How would you play these chords?

FMaj11b9 is not a typical chord. In fact it's the opposite of typical. Major chords generally don't have 11's or b9's. (anything is possible of course)

11's are a common color in minor type chords
b9's are a common color in dominant chords
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#27
Quote by AndrewSchaeffer
im still new to music theory. what do you mean? or what would you play over that chord progression, giving the first chord used in that rock like progression is EMajor
Andrew - I get the impression after reading all of your posts in this thread that you may not be entirely sure exactly how to name the chords you're playing. If you are sure, please accept my apologies for my misjudgment. If you're not, there's certainly no shame in admitting it, because we're all here to learn from all the rest of us.

In any case, would you mind please posting either the tab or chord diagrams of what you're playing? I think doing this would go a long way toward answering your question.
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